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No One Knows How Safe New Driver-Assistance Systems Really Are

WIRED

This week, a US Department of Transportation report detailed the crashes that advanced driver-assistance systems have been involved in over the past year or so. Tesla's advanced features, including Autopilot and Full Self-Driving, accounted for 70 percent of the nearly 400 incidents--many more than previously known. But the report may raise more questions about this safety tech than it answers, researchers say, because of blind spots in the data. The report examined systems that promise to take some of the tedious or dangerous bits out of driving by automatically changing lanes, staying within lane lines, braking before collisions, slowing down before big curves in the road, and, in some cases, operating on highways without driver intervention. The systems include Autopilot, Ford's BlueCruise, General Motors' Super Cruise, and Nissan's ProPilot Assist. While it does show that these systems aren't perfect, there's still plenty to learn about how a new breed of safety features actually work on the road.


Automakers Report Nearly 400 Crashes of Cars That Used Driver-Assist Tech

TIME - Tech

Automakers reported nearly 400 crashes over a 10-month period involving vehicles with partially automated driver-assist systems, including 273 with Teslas, according to statistics released Wednesday by U.S. safety regulators. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration cautioned against using the numbers to compare automakers, saying it didn't weight them by the number of vehicles from each manufacturer that use the systems, or how many miles those vehicles traveled. Automakers reported crashes from July of last year through May 15 under an order from the agency, which is examining such crashes broadly for the first time. "As we gather more data, NHTSA will be able to better identify any emerging risks or trends and learn more about how these technologies are performing in the real world," said Steven Cliff, the agency's administrator. Tesla's crashes happened while vehicles were using Autopilot, "Full Self-Driving," Traffic Aware Cruise Control, or other driver-assist systems that have some control over speed and steering.


Nearly 400 car crashes in 11 months involved automated tech, companies tell regulators

NPR Technology

A Tesla owner charges his vehicle in April 2021 at a charging station in Topeka, Kan.. Tesla reported 273 crashes involving partially automated driving systems, according to statistics released by U.S. safety regulators on Wednesday. A Tesla owner charges his vehicle in April 2021 at a charging station in Topeka, Kan.. Tesla reported 273 crashes involving partially automated driving systems, according to statistics released by U.S. safety regulators on Wednesday. Automakers reported nearly 400 crashes of vehicles with partially automated driver-assist systems, including 273 involving Teslas, according to statistics released Wednesday by U.S. safety regulators. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration cautioned against using the numbers to compare automakers, saying it didn't weight them by the number of vehicles from each manufacturer that use the systems, or how many miles those vehicles traveled. Automakers reported crashes from July of last year through May 15 under an order from the agency, which is examining such crashes broadly for the first time.


Tesla and Honda report over 350 crashes involving advanced driving assistance systems

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Tesla Inc reported 273 vehicle crashes involving advanced driving assistance systems like Autopilot since July, while Honda Motor identified 90, data from U.S. auto safety regulators released on Wednesday showed. The companies made the disclosures to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) after the regulator issued an order in June 2021 requiring automakers and tech companies to immediately report all crashes involving advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and vehicles equipped with automated driving systems being tested on public roads. Of the 392 total crashes involving ADAS reported by a dozen automakers, six deaths were reported and five had serious injuries.


Tesla Tops U.S. Agency List of Crashes Suspected to Involve Driver-Assistance Technology

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Electric-vehicle maker Tesla reported the most vehicle crashes suspected of involving advanced driver-assistance technology in the U.S. government's first-ever survey of such incidents. The auto industry's top safety regulator said Wednesday that it had received reports of nearly 400 recent crashes in which advanced driver-assistance features were engaged during or immediately before the incident. More than two-thirds of those crashes happened in a Tesla vehicle, it said.


AI in Warfare: Fiction or Impending Reality

#artificialintelligence

What is Artificial Intelligence (AI)? There are many definitions of Artificial Intelligence (AI) but none of them effectively captures what AI is capable of. As such, I will not be defining AI, rather, I will be reporting the goal of AI as encapsulated at the 1956 Dartmouth Summer Project on Artificial Intelligence, where the science and technology of AI was properly born. 'To proceed on the basis of the conjecture that every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can be so precisely described that a machine can be made to simulate it'[i] Although it has hardly been restated, this goal has the been the underlying drive behind every manifestation of AI since then. If it takes human intelligence and learning to get a thing done, then it can be replicated by a machine, once we break down the components of the particular intelligence and learning approach at play.


Tesla FSD Beta users show how the system works -- and doesn't

#artificialintelligence

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been promising customers a driverless vehicle since at least 2016. While the company hasn't delivered on that promise, Tesla lets thousands of employees and customers try new and unfinished driver assistance features on public roads in the U.S. through a program called Full Self Driving Beta, or FSD Beta. Only Tesla owners who have the company's premium FSD driver assistance system installed in their cars can join the FSD Beta program. Owners must then obtain a high driver-safety score, as determined by Tesla software that monitors their driving habits, and maintain it to keep FSD Beta access. No safety certification or professional training is required.


What's going on with self-driving cars right now?

#artificialintelligence

Pony.ai is the latest autonomous car company to make headlines for the wrong reasons. It has just lost its permit to test its fleet of autonomous vehicles in California over concerns about the driving record of the safety drivers it employs. It's a big blow for the company, and highlights the interesting spot the autonomous car industry is in right now. After a few years of very bad publicity, a number of companies have made real progress in getting self-driving cars on the road. If you're curious about what Pony.ai and some of the other major outfits are up to, here's a handy alphabetized guide to some of the key firms working on autonomous vehicles.


Bizarre concept car 'The Huntress' has wheels that can twist to cope with uneven terrains

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you've been off-roading before, it's likely you remember bouncing around the back of a 4x4. But the days of clinging on for dear life could soon be a thing of the past, if a new concept car is anything to go by. The concept vehicle, called The Huntress, features wheels that can twist autonomously to cope with uneven terrains. If you've been off-roading before, it's likely you remember bouncing around the back of a 4x4. The Huntress is an electric off-road concept car designed by Connery Xu, that wouldn't be out of place in the Transformers franchise.


#selfdrivingcars_2022-06-01_05-29-21.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 1,612 Twitter users whose tweets in the requested range contained "#selfdrivingcars", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets. The network was obtained from the NodeXL Graph Server on Wednesday, 01 June 2022 at 12:38 UTC. The requested start date was Wednesday, 01 June 2022 at 00:01 UTC and the maximum number of tweets (going backward in time) was 7,500. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 19-day, 11-hour, 44-minute period from Thursday, 12 May 2022 at 09:04 UTC to Tuesday, 31 May 2022 at 20:48 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this data set were also collected from prior time periods.