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How low-code development could boost AI adoption

#artificialintelligence

Every company may want to put artificial intelligence to work, but most companies aren't blessed with the ability to hire battalions of data scientists–nor is that necessarily the right approach. As Gartner analyst Svetlana Sicular once argued, often the best possible data scientist is the person you already employ who knows your data and simply needs help figuring out how to unlock it. For many business line owners, it's this kind of approach that may make the most sense, as they seek to be smarter with the data they already have. One company working to enable this vision is Cambridge, Massachusetts-based machine learning startup Akkio, which pairs AI with low code in an attempt to democratize AI. I caught up with company co-founder and COO Jon Reilly to learn more.


A deeper look into the impact of new technologies on our work

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But before delving into'behind-the-scenes' of US banking industry meeting ATM, let's turn back time for a second -- on March 27th, 1998, in the New Tech 1998 conference in Denver, Colorado. Here, Neil Postman, a prominent American cultural critic and professor at New York University, gave a keynote lecture. Professor Postman has been a long-time scholar of how new technologies relate to human society, and the book'Amusing Ourselves to Death', a 1985 book that rose to stardom, shows how television technology is destroying public discourse and turning everything into entertainment. I think it has something to do with how we feel about the impact of today's media and how our lives exposed to it are deteriorating. Since this book, Professor Postman has strongly criticized the tendency to respond to all social problems through technical solutions.


New technology propels efforts to fight Western wildfires

Boston Herald

As drought- and wind-driven wildfires have become more dangerous across the American West in recent years, firefighters have tried to become smarter in how they prepare. They're using new technology and better positioning of resources in a bid to keep small blazes from erupting into mega-fires like the ones that torched a record 4% of California last year, or the nation's biggest wildfire this year that has charred a section of Oregon half the size of Rhode Island. There have been 730 more wildfires in California so far this year than last, an increase of about 16%. But nearly triple the area has burned -- 470 square miles. Catching fires more quickly gives firefighters a better chance of keeping them small.


Bumble dating app led FBI to Capitol riot suspect: DOJ

FOX News

Fox News congressional correspondent Jacqui Heinrich has the latest from Capitol Hill on'America Reports' The FBI was tipped off to a Texas man arrested Friday for allegedly assaulting police officers during the Capitol riot after messaging with a woman he met on the dating app Bumble in January, the Justice Department announced. Andrew Quentin Taake, 32, was charged with assaulting an officer, obstructing an official proceeding, and other offenses for his actions during the riot, which allegedly included pepper-spraying several officers and assaulting others with a whip-like weapon. The FBI received a tip from a woman he met on the online dating app, Bumble, on Jan. 9. Screenshots of their messages show that Taake sent the woman a selfie that was taken "about 30 minutes after being sprayed," allegedly telling the potential suitor that he was at the riot "from the very beginning." A woman who Andrew Quentin Taake matched with on Bumble tipped off the FBI about his alleged Capitol riot involvement. Taake allegedly flew to Washington, D.C., from Houston the day before the riot and returned home a few days later.


What AI Experts Fear From AI - AI Summary

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Titled "Investing in trustworthy AI," the 82-page report from Deloitte and the Chamber Technology Engagement Center sought to identify the concerns that technology experts have when it comes to the adoption of AI, as well as highlight the impact that government investment in AI can have on the emerging technology. For instance, the survey found that 66% of respondents indicated that "the government could mitigate unwanted biases" and found 69% suggested that "the government could encourage accountability for AI decisions." Two-thirds of survey-takers want the government to reduce the impact of job loss due to AI, while 72% said the government could "mitigate acceleration of social divides between workers with and without AI skills." "Broadly, respondents overwhelmingly supported the notion that government intervention could enhance the benefits of AI and thus contribute to increased AI trustworthiness," the report states. One-quarter of patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office use AI technologies in some shape or form, reports Deloitte, which claims that the economic impact of AI will be somewhere between $447 billion and $1.43 trillion over the next five years.


Listed Funds Trust - TrueShares Technology, AI & Deep Learning ETF (LRNZ) gains 0.84% for July 23

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Listed Funds Trust - TrueShares Technology, AI & Deep Learning ETF (NYSE: LRNZ) shares gained 0.84%, or $0.3862 per share, to close Friday at $46.42. After opening the day at $46.33, shares of Listed Funds - TrueSharesnology, AI & Deep Learning ETF fluctuated between $46.50 and $46.01. Friday's activity brought Listed Funds - TrueSharesnology, AI & Deep Learning ETF's market cap to $30,170,400. The New York Stock Exchange is the world's largest stock exchange by market value at over $26 trillion. It is also the leader for initial public offerings, with $82 billion raised in 2020, including six of the seven largest technology deals.


Army tests HPC climate model in Azure cloud -- GCN

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The Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is working with Microsoft to improve climate modeling and natural disaster resilience planning through the use of predictive analytics-powered, cloud-based tools and artificial intelligence services. Under a new agreement, ERDC will test the scalability of its coastal storm modeling system, CSTORM-MS -- which was previously run on high-performance computers -- inside Microsoft's Azure Government cloud. The CSTORM-MS models provide can give coastal communities a robust, standardized approach for determining the risk of future storm events and for evaluating flood risk reduction measures caused by tropical and extra-tropical storms, as well as wind, wave and water levels. Currently, CSTORM-MS models are run at ERDC's Department of Defense Supercomputing Resource Center. In 2020, ERDC worked with DOD's High Performance Modernization Program's (HPCMP) on a feasibility study testing whether CSTORM-MS could be run in a commercial cloud.


I SEE U, Episode 10: Black A I = Artificial Inclusion

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A young computer scientist who grew up in Mississippi is focusing her efforts on fairness and identifying biases in technology. Though she's working in Atlanta as an artificial intelligence researcher for Amazon, she's reinvesting much of her earnings towards the development of a multi-million dollar innovation center that's set to transform her native downtown Jackson. Dr. Nashlie Sephus is also CEO of The Bean Path -- a non-profit that works to bridge the "tech gap" in communities where access to technical expertise, computer coding and other resources are limited. She speaks candidly with host Eddie Robinson about her experiences in closing commercial real estate deals in the Deep South and how she's worked in a field of study where there's not many Black women with PhDs. Fill out the form below to subscribe our new daily editorial newsletter from the HPM Newsroom.


Using satellites and AI, space-based technology is shaping the future of firefighting

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Using satellites, drones and artificial intelligence, emerging technology is changing the way firefighting agencies and governments battle the ever-increasing threat of wildfires as hundreds of thousands of acres burn across the western United States. New programs are being developed by startups and research institutions to predict fire behavior, monitor drought and even detect fires when they first start. As climate change continues to increase the intensity and frequency of wildfires, these breakthroughs offer at least one tool in the growing arsenal of prevention and suppression strategies. "This is not to replace firefighting on the ground," said Ilkay Altintas, a computer scientist with the University of California, San Diego, who developed a fire map for the region. "The more science and data we can give firefighters and the public, the quicker we'll have solutions to combat and mitigate wildfires."


Global Big Data Conference

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In the United States, an estimated 114,000 people were waiting for organ transplants, and only 30% of those got their organs on time in 2019. According to Kaiser Health News and Reveal from the Center of Investigative Reporting, nearly 170 organs could not be transplanted. Almost 370 endured near misses with delays of two hours or more because of transportation problems. According to the American Transplant Foundation, 20 people die each day because they do not receive their lifesaving organs in time, making the number of annual deaths greater than 40,000. Patti Niles is CEO of Southwest Transplant Alliance, a non-profit organ procurement organization.