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Bruisable artificial skin could help prosthetics, robots sense injuries

#artificialintelligence

IMAGE: An artificial skin attached to a person's knee develops a purple "bruise " when hit forcefully against a metal cabinet. Credit: Adapted from ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.1c04911 When someone bumps their elbow against a wall, they not only feel pain but also might experience bruising. Robots and prosthetic limbs don't have these warning signs, which could lead to further injury. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an artificial skin that senses force through ionic signals and also changes color from yellow to a bruise-like purple, providing a visual cue that damage has occurred.


AI in Employee Training Can Help with Predicted Post-Pandemic Turnover - AI Trends

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Dramatic employee turnover is being predicted in the post-pandemic era, at the same time that AI is being incorporated into more learning and development solutions, giving employers an opportunity to establish a competitive differentiation. An employee turnover "tsunami" is predicted by results from a survey of 2,000 adults in February conducted by The Work Institute, a research and consulting firm in Franklin, Tenn., according to an account from SHRM, the Society of Human Resource Management. The survey found that half of employees in North America plan to look for a new job in 2021. "We see absolutely pent-up turnover demand in the U.S. workforce," stated Danny Nelms, president of The Work Institute, which is focused on employee engagement and retention. Prior to the pandemic, the firm would see about 3.5 million people leaving their jobs monthly.


Novavax And Lowe's Among Today's Trending Stocks

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The stock market shook Wednesday after the Federal Reserve raised its inflation expectations for the year and moved up its next hike on interest rates. The policymaking Federal Open Market Committee noted that rate hikes may occur in 2023, a reversal from its March statements that it foresaw no increases until beyond then. However, a date for the Fed's expected reversal of its $120 billion per month bond buying program didn't come up, the Fed Chief has noted that the central bank will provide "advanced notice" before tapering asset purchases. This thrust investors' worries about fiscal policy decisions into the spotlight after weeks of nail-biting angst, while many individual stocks did indeed trend down for the day. But many of these stocks were already trending this week anyway on their own merits. Let's explore a few of them, and take a peek behind the curtain into what, exactly, is going on in some of America's biggest industries.


Driving The Next Generation of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is disrupting a multitude of industries. This article is a response to an article arguing that an AI Winter maybe inevitable. However, I believe that there are fundamental differences between what happened in the 1970s (the fist AI winter) and late 1980s (the second AI winter with the fall of Expert Systems) with the arrival and growth of the internet, smart mobiles and social media resulting in the volume and velocity of data being generated constantly increasing and requiring Machine Learning and Deep Learning to make sense of the Big Data that we generate. For those wishing to see a details about what AI is then I suggest reading an Intro to AI, and for the purposes of this article I will assume Machine Learning and Deep Learning to be a subset of Artificial Intelligence (AI). AI deals with the area of developing computing systems that are capable of performing tasks that humans are very good at, for example recognising objects, recognising and making sense of speech, and decision making in a constrained environment.


AI Could Spot Wildfires Faster Than Humans

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During his eight years as community alert and warning manager in Sonoma County, California, Sam Wallis has repeatedly watched wildfires roar through the cities and small towns he protects. Often with little warning, fires have razed homes and charred the area's picturesque hillsides, valleys and vineyards just north of San Francisco. Wallis had to evacuate his own home last year. And in 2017 his property was strewn with wind-blown debris from the deadly, 37,000-acre Tubbs Fire, one of the most destructive in California's history. "The Tubbs Fire was the seminal event, an absolutely massive and fast-moving fire that we had no way of tracking," Wallis says.


5 insider tech travel hacks you'll use every single trip

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Every summer, I get the travel itch. Before you head out, make sure your home is locked down. The bad news is security cameras, from video doorbells to a full-fledged security system, aren't always hack-proof out of the box. Tap or click here for the steps to make sure only you can access your security and video doorbell camera's feed. Speaking of cameras, best check your rental for any hidden cameras.


Global Big Data Conference

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AI budgets are up significantly over the past year as companies compete to survive and grow market share during the global pandemic, according to Appen, which published its State of AI and Machine Learning report this week. The study also detected a correlation between AI budget size and the likelihood that AI projects will actually be deployed on the one hand, and budgets and the use of external data providers on the other. Now in its seventh year, Appen's State of AI seeks to generate a broad snapshot of AI investments across the United States. The company contracted with Harris Poll to investigate various aspects of AI investments and project management at 500 companies, all of which had at least 100 employees. The growth in AI budgets was perhaps the most compelling result to come out of the study, which had a margin of error of 5%.


AI Could Spot Wildfires Faster Than Humans

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence software has been sifting through the images of 21 tower-mounted cameras in Sonoma County, Calif., comparing them with historical photographs. If anything looks out of place, the system alerts the fire emergency center. The goal is to investigate potential fire starts earlier and get firefighters to them more quickly. In the weeks since the technology was fully activated, AI has bested 911 calls by as much as 10 minutes--a small time window but one that can mean the difference between a scorched smudge and a runaway wildfire. Similar early-detection technology is being tested in New Mexico, and scientists in Brazil have deployed an AI system that processes images from tower-mounted 360-degree cameras, alerting local officials about any apparent fires.


Facebook can now detect 'the most dangerous crime of the future' and the AI used to make them

The Independent - Tech

Facebook has developed a model to tell when a video is using a deepfake – and can even tell which algorithm was used to create it. The term "deepfake" refers to a video where artificial intelligence and deep learning – an algorithmic learning method used to train computers – has been used to make a person appear to say something they have not. Notable examples of deepfakes include a manipulated video of Richard Nixon's Apollo 11 presidential address and Barack Obama insulting Donald Trump – and although they are relatively benign now, experts suggest that they could be the most dangerous crime of the future. Detecting a deepfake relies on telling whether an image is real or not, but the amount of information available to researchers to do so can be limited – relying on potential input-output pairs or rely on hardware information that might not be available in the real world. Facebook's new process relies in detecting the unique patterns behind an artificially-intelligent model that could generate a deepfake.


'Madden NFL 22': Tom Brady, Patrick Mahomes on video game cover, but inside are new realistic tweaks

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The quarterbacks who competed in Super Bowl 2021 are facing off again – on the cover of the upcoming "Madden NFL 22" video game. Tampa Bay Buccaneers' Tom Brady and the Kansas City Chiefs' Patrick Mahomes both appear on the cover of the game, due out Aug. 20 ($69.99, for PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/SX; $59.99, for PS4, Xbox One, PCs and Google Stadia). They are the most-recent two Super Bowl MVPs, though Brady won the big game in February. It's a rarity for Madden NFL to have two players on the cover, though in 2010, the video game series featured Super Bowl XLIII participants Larry Fitzgerald of the Arizona Cardinals and Troy Polamalu of the Pittsburgh Steelers as co-cover athletes. Brady and Mahomes have each appeared previously on the Madden NFL cover; Brady in 2018, Mahomes in 2020.