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AOTH-NexOptic Technology Corp. joins Arm AI Partner Program

#artificialintelligence

From the primitive scratchings of ancient cave dwellers, to the super-high-resolution images of far-off galaxies captured by modern telescopes, human beings have always been obsessed with pictures. The history of photography is the progression of society's ability to freeze an image in time, using technology to gradually improve its quality. The word photography is based on the Greek "photos" and "graphe" which together means "drawing with light". While decent-quality photos today are instantly available with the touch of a button on any smart phone, early photography was a laborious process that often delivered poor results. Picture-making dates back to antiquity with the discovery of two principles – camera obscura image projection, and the observation that certain substances can be altered by exposure to light. Camera obscura, the phenomenon that occurs when an image is projected through a small hole onto an opposite surface, was found in the writings of Aristotle and Chinese scholars, dating back to the 4th century BC.


Artificial intelligence is learning to see in the dark

#artificialintelligence

Written on 18 May 2018. The tiny image sensors in most modern cameras can only absorb a small amount of light, which often results in dark, grainy images. To try to solve this problem without inventing a new image sensor, researchers at Intel and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champlain taught an artificial intelligence algorithm how to take the data from darker images and reconstruct them so that they're brighter and clearer, according to research published this month and to be presented in June at an industry conference. To train the algorithm, the researchers showed it two version of more than 5,000 images taken in low-light scenarios: One set that was taken to be purposefully too dark, and one set that was taken with a longer exposure time, meaning the sensor is given more time to collect light and better expose the image. The Intel and UIUC team claims the algorithm can now amplify low-light images the equivalent of up to 300 times the exposure, without the same noise and discoloration that programs like Photoshop might introduce or having to take two separate images.


Artificial intelligence is learning to see in the dark

#artificialintelligence

Cameras--especially phone cameras--are terrible at taking pictures in the dark. The tiny image sensors in most modern cameras can only absorb a small amount of light, which often results in dark, grainy images. To try to solve this problem without inventing a new image sensor, researchers at Intel and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champlain taught an artificial intelligence algorithm how to take the data from darker images and reconstruct them so that they're brighter and clearer, according to research published this month and to be presented in June at an industry conference. To train the algorithm, the researchers showed it two version of more than 5,000 images taken in low-light scenarios: One set that was taken to be purposefully too dark, and one set that was taken with a longer exposure time, meaning the sensor is given more time to collect light and better expose the image. The Intel and UIUC team claims the algorithm can now amplify low-light images the equivalent of up to 300 times the exposure, without the same noise and discoloration that programs like Photoshop might introduce or having to take two separate images.


CES 2018 Proves Artificial Intelligence Will Take Over Our Lives

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is suddenly everywhere. From phones and TVs to air conditioners and even a toilet, the flashy new products at the year's CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas - the world's largest tech show - are showing the 180,000 attendees that if a device doesn't have AI inside, it's not worth having.


Sony unveils its latest products ahead of CES in Las Vegas

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Sony has revealed several new products designed to take your entertainment experience to the next level.


fulltext

Communications of the ACM

Cambit pieces can be assembled to create a dozen different imaging systems. The cameras in our phones and tablets have turned us all into avid photographers, regularly using them to capture special moments and document our lives. One notable feature of camera phones is they are compact and fully automatic, enabling us to point and shoot without having to adjust any settings. However, when we need to capture photos of high aesthetic quality, we resort to more sophisticated DSLR cameras in which a variety of lenses and flashes can be used interchangeably. This flexibility is important for spanning the entire range of real-world imaging scenarios, while enabling us to be more creative. Many developers have sought to make these cameras even more flexible through both hardware and software.