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Baltimore May Soon Ban Face Recognition for Everyone but Cops

WIRED

After years of failed attempts to curb surveillance technologies, Baltimore is close to enacting one of the nation's most stringent bans on facial recognition. But Baltimore's proposed ban would be very different from laws in San Francisco or Portland, Oregon: It would last for only one year, police would be exempt, and certain private uses of the tech would become illegal. City councilmember Kristerfer Burnett, who introduced the proposed ban, says it was shaped by the nuances of Baltimore, though critics complain it could unfairly penalize, or even jail, private citizens who use the tech. Last year, Burnett introduced a version of the bill that would have banned city use of facial recognition permanently. When that failed, he instead introduced this version, with a built-in one year "sunset" clause requiring council approval to be extended.


Best Reliable Deep-Tech For Security Agencies To Track Criminals

#artificialintelligence

Content monitoring through AI technologies, smart cameras for facial identification, DNA profiling algorithms are some of the techniques witnessing a surge throughout the world. Technologies provide us with reliable and trustable data to bank upon, but the questions arising on its accuracy can be a debatable issue. Let's have a look at a recent case to understand the apprehension. Recently, in two separate judgements -- a judge from the Appellate Division of the Superior Court of New Jersey and a federal judge in Pennsylvania in the United States have ordered the prosecutor to hand over the source code of TrueAllele by Cybergenetics. The software program ran different DNA data available on a gun through complex statistical algorithms to compare the probability of a specific person's DNA being present.


NSW Police Introduce New Video Analysis Tools With Ethics At Their Core - Which-50

#artificialintelligence

This week, the New South Wales Police announced the introduction of upgrades to their Insights policing platform. This new technology is designed to provide further services to frontline officers through faster access to critical information in the course of their roles in identifying persons and criminal activity across the state. Powered by Microsoft Azure cognitive technologies, the machine learning and deep learning capabilities were fully deployed in February 2021, with the goal of reducing police labour hours on manual data processing tasks, such as reviewing video feeds. Examples of how the AI systems will be used include one case were NSW Police collected 14,000 pieces of CCTV footage as part of a murder and assault investigation which would previously have taken detectives months to analyse. Microsoft claims the AI/ML infused Insights platform ingested this huge volume of information in five hours and prepared it for analysis by NSW Police Force investigators, a process which would otherwise have taken many weeks to months.


Expect an Orwellian future if AI isn't kept in check, Microsoft exec says

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence could lead to an Orwellian future if laws to protect the public aren't enacted soon, according to Microsoft President Brad Smith. Smith made the comments to the BBC news program "Panorama" on May 26, during an episode focused on the potential dangers of artificial intelligence (AI) and the race between the United States and China to develop the technology. The warning comes about a month after the European Union released draft regulations attempting to set limits on how AI can be used. There are few similar efforts in the United States, where legislation has largely focused on limiting regulation and promoting AI for national security purposes. "I'm constantly reminded of George Orwell's lessons in his book '1984,'" Smith said.


King County ban on police use of facial recognition software spotlights local movements across US

ZDNet

Facial recognition opponents rejoiced this week after the local government of King County, Washington voted to ban local police from using the technology. The move was notable for a number of reasons. The ACLU of Washington said in a statement that the new King County ban on police use of facial recognition software was the first in the country to be county-wide and cover multiple cities. Electronic Frontier Foundation senior staff attorney Adam Schwartz added that it was the most populous government body to institute a ban, with more than two million residents within its borders. The ban was also hailed among privacy advocates as a direct shot at Microsoft and Amazon, both of which have headquarters in King County's biggest city: Seattle.


Orwellian AI (BBC News) - Humanities Watch

#artificialintelligence

Life as depicted in George Orwell's 1984 "could come to pass in 2024" if lawmakers don't protect the public against artificial intelligence, Microsoft's president has warned…. "If we don't enact the laws that will protect the public in the future, we are going to find the technology racing ahead, and it's going to be very difficult to catch up," Mr Smith said. "I'm constantly reminded of George Orwell's lessons in his book 1984. You know the fundamental story…was about a government who could see everything that everyone did and hear everything that everyone said all the time. "Well, that didn't come to pass in 1984, but if we're not careful that could come to pass in 2024." In certain parts of the world, reality is increasingly catching up with that view of science fiction, he added…. Eric Schmidt, former Google chief executive who is now chair of the US National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, has warned that beating China in AI is imperative. "We're in a geo-political strategic conflict with China," he said. "The way to win is to marshal our resources together to have national and global strategies for the democracies to win in AI. "If we don't, we'll be looking at a future where other values will be imposed on us."


If Police Have Devices That Can Read Your Mind, How Does the Fifth Amendment Fit In?

Slate

This article is part of the Policing and Technology Project, a collaboration between Future Tense and the Tech, Law, & Security Program at American University Washington College of Law that examines the relationship between law enforcement, police reform, and technology. It's the middle of the night, you are disoriented, and they want to know where you were earlier in the day. You have no idea at that moment that your ex-girlfriend was found dead, and some of your fingerprints were found at her house--but you do know you have the right to remain silent. Until the cops bring out the headset. One of the hallmarks of the U.S. Constitution is the enumerated right of citizens to not be coerced into self-incrimination or be allowed to "take the Fifth."


Is REAL ID A Real Security Solution? 3 Ways It's Designed To Protect You

#artificialintelligence

Soon, your driver's license may not be enough to get you through airport security in the United States. Oct. 1, 2020 is the deadline for U.S. citizens to have REAL ID-compliant state driver's licenses, a requirement passed by Congress in 2005 in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Without a compliant driver's license, those who are 18 and over won't be able to board a domestic flight, unless possessing other specific forms of acceptable identification. The thought behind this was that with standardization, it will become a lot harder to forge documents and gain access to aircraft. While the main idea of REAL ID is to better protect U.S. citizens and their identity, there is controversy over the law.


AI warning: Life will be like Orwell's 1984 'without curbs on AI'

#artificialintelligence

Life could become like George Orwell's 1984 within three years if laws aren't introduced to protect the public from artificial intelligence, Microsoft president Brad Smith has warned. Smith predicts that the kind of controlled, mass surveillance society portrayed by Orwell in his 1949 dystopian novel'could come to pass in 2024' if more isn't done to curb the spread of AI. It is going to be difficult for lawmakers to catch up with rapidly advancing artificial intelligence and surveillance technology, he told BBC Panorama during a special exploring China's increasing use of AI to monitor its citizens. The Microsoft president said: 'If we don't enact the laws that will protect the public in the future, we are going to find the technology racing ahead.' Life for humans will'become like Orwell's 1984' by 2024 if laws aren't introduced to protect the public from artificial intelligence, warns Microsoft president Brad Smith Facial recognition software works by matching real time images to a previous photograph of a person.


Microsoft president Brad Smith warns 'life will be like Orwell's 1984' by 2024

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Life could become like George Orwell's 1984 within three years if laws aren't introduced to protect the public from artificial intelligence, Microsoft president Brad Smith has warned. Smith predicts that the kind of controlled, mass surveillance society portrayed by Orwell in his 1949 dystopian novel'could come to pass in 2024' if more isn't done to curb the spread of AI. It is going to be difficult for lawmakers to catch up with rapidly advancing artificial intelligence and surveillance technology, he told BBC Panorama during a special exploring China's increasing use of AI to monitor its citizens. The Microsoft president said: 'If we don't enact the laws that will protect the public in the future, we are going to find the technology racing ahead.' Life for humans will'become like Orwell's 1984' by 2024 if laws aren't introduced to protect the public from artificial intelligence, warns Microsoft president Brad Smith Facial recognition software works by matching real time images to a previous photograph of a person.