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Most Shocking Deepfake Videos Of 2021

#artificialintelligence

Only, it was a deepfake. So was the video of Donald Trump taunting Belgium for remaining in the Paris climate agreement and Barack Obama's public service announcement as posted by Buzzfeed. These great examples of deepfakes are the 21st Century's answer to Photoshopped images and videos. Synthetic media, deepfakes, use artificial intelligence (AI) -- deep learning technology, to replace an existing person in an image or video with someone else. One reason for the widespread use of deepfake technology in popular celebrities is that these personalities have a large number of pictures available on the internet, allowing AI to train and learn from.


Deep diving into deepfakes

#artificialintelligence

The weaponisation of deepfakes against politicians or nation states has become something we're simply going to have to live with,


Nixon's grim moon-disaster speech is a now a warning about the deepfake future

ZDNet

The entertainment industry has yet to regulate the use of deepfakes and voice cloning. On September 29, the Emmy for interactive documentary went to'In Event of Moon Disaster', a film that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to create a fake video featuring former US President Richard Nixon. The film shows him delivering a speech that was prepared in case the Apollo 11 mission failed, leaving astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to die on the moon. The multimedia project was created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Center for Advanced Virtuality, with a bit of help from a Ukrainian voice-cloning startup, Respeecher, which worked on Nixon's voice. The increasing scale of AI is raising the stakes for major ethical questions.


Watch Nixon's 'Apollo 11 Disaster' Deepfake Video

#artificialintelligence

A recent article outlines the growing danger of deepfakes and their increased realism, due to machine learning and artificial intelligence. MIT's Center for Advanced Virtuality has created a technologically advanced storytelling project that has manipulated archived footage of President Richard Nixon's 1969 speech during the Apollo 11 lunar landing. The goal of the video is to demonstrate the convincing deepfake technology and warn the public of the burgeoning threat of media misinformation. While the manipulation of photography has existed since the 19th century, becoming affluent during the era of motion pictures, the current state of deepfakes has become alarmingly realistic. Beginning in the late 90's, computer scientists began experimenting with facial reanimation.


Deepfake video: It takes AI to beat AI

#artificialintelligence

By now, most of us have shared a few chuckles over AI-generated deepfake videos, like those in which the face of comedian and impressionist Bill Hader gradually takes on the likenesses of Tom Cruise, Seth Rogen, and Arnold Schwarzenegger as he imitates the celebrities. We've seen actor Ryan Reynolds' mug superimposed over Gene Wilder's in the 1971 classic film "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory." We've even marveled over businessman Elon Musk being turned into a baby. It all can be quite humorous, but not everyone is laughing. Tech companies, researchers, and politicians alike are growing concerned that the increasing sophistication of the artificial intelligence and machine learning technology powering deepfakes will outpace our ability to discern between genuine and doctored imagery.


Deepfake video: It takes AI to beat AI

#artificialintelligence

By now, most of us have shared a few chuckles over AI-generated deepfake videos, like those in which the face of comedian and impressionist Bill Hader gradually takes on the likenesses of Tom Cruise, Seth Rogen, and Arnold Schwarzenegger as he imitates the celebrities. We've seen actor Ryan Reynolds' mug superimposed over Gene Wilder's in the 1971 classic film "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory." We've even marveled over businessman Elon Musk being turned into a baby. It all can be quite humorous, but not everyone is laughing. Tech companies, researchers, and politicians alike are growing concerned that the increasing sophistication of the artificial intelligence and machine learning technology powering deepfakes will outpace our ability to discern between genuine and doctored imagery.


New California bill makes it illegal to create deepfake porn of someone without their consent

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new California law will ban the creation and distribution of deepfake pornography produced without the consent of the person it depicts. Statutory damages range between $1,500 and $30,000, while cases in which malice can be demonstrated, damages rise to $150,000. The bill is part of a larger deepfake package that will also make it illegal to create and distribute deepfake videos of political figures within 60 days of an election. Katy Perry's face (pictured above) was swapped onto an adult film actress' body for a short video, something that the new California law will make illegal. Almost all deepfake videos are circulated online are pornographic, with one study suggesting the figure is 96 percent.


'Deepfakes' are becoming more realistic, and could signal the next wave of attacks on politicians

#artificialintelligence

When Peter Cushing turned to face the camera in Rogue One, Star Wars fans were as excited as they were confused. After all, the actor had died more than 20 years earlier, and yet, there was no mistaking him. For a major Hollywood movie, this is a clever trick. But not everyone is trying to entertain us, and you don't need a million-dollar budget to deceive. "You take the face of one person and put it on the body of another," said Jeff Smith, associate director at the National Center for Media Forensics at the University of Colorado Denver.


AI in the media and creative industries

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Thanks to the Big Data revolution and increasing computing capacities, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has made an impressive revival over the past few years and is now omnipresent in both research and industry. The creative sectors have always been early adopters of AI technologies and this continues to be the case. As a matter of fact, recent technological developments keep pushing the boundaries of intelligent systems in creative applications: the critically acclaimed movie "Sunspring", released in 2016, was entirely written by AI technology, and the first-ever Music Album, called "Hello World", produced using AI has been released this year. Simultaneously, the exploratory nature of the creative process is raising important technical challenges for AI such as the ability for AI-powered techniques to be accurate under limited data resources, as opposed to the conventional "Big Data" approach, or the ability to process, analyse and match data from multiple modalities (text, sound, images, etc.) at the same time. The purpose of this white paper is to understand future technological advances in AI and their growing impact on creative industries. This paper addresses the following questions: Where does AI operate in creative Industries? What is its operative role? How will AI transform creative industries in the next ten years? This white paper aims to provide a realistic perspective of the scope of AI actions in creative industries, proposes a vision of how this technology could contribute to research and development works in such context, and identifies research and development challenges.


Misinformation woes could multiply with 'deepfake' videos

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you see a video of a politician speaking words he never would utter, or a Hollywood star improbably appearing in a cheap adult movie, don't adjust your television set -- you may just be witnessing the future of'fake news.' 'Deepfake' videos that manipulate reality are becoming more sophisticated due to advances in artificial intelligence, creating the potential for new kinds of misinformation with devastating consequences. As the technology advances, worries are growing about how deepfakes can be used for nefarious purposes by hackers or state actors. Paul Scharre of the Center for a New American Security looks at a'deepfake' video of former US President Barack Obama manipulated to show him speaking words from actor Jordan Peele on January 24, 2019, in Washington'We're not quite to the stage where we are seeing deepfakes weaponized, but that moment is coming,' Robert Chesney, a University of Texas law professor who has researched the topic, told AFP. Chesney argues that deepfakes could add to the current turmoil over disinformation and influence operations. 'A well-timed and thoughtfully scripted deepfake or series of deepfakes could tip an election, spark violence in a city primed for civil unrest, bolster insurgent narratives about an enemy's supposed atrocities, or exacerbate political divisions in a society,' Chesney and University of Maryland professor Danielle Citron said in a blog post for the Council on Foreign Relations.