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Scientists use big data to sway elections and predict riots -- welcome to the 1960s

Nature

Ignorance of history is a badge of honour in Silicon Valley. "The only thing that matters is the future," self-driving-car engineer Anthony Levandowski told The New Yorker in 20181. Levandowski, formerly of Google, Uber and Google's autonomous-vehicle subsidiary Waymo (and recently sentenced to 18 months in prison for stealing trade secrets), is no outlier. The gospel of'disruptive innovation' depends on the abnegation of history2. 'Move fast and break things' was Facebook's motto. Another word for this is heedlessness. And here are a few more: negligence, foolishness and blindness.


Justice Dept. scrambles to jam prison cellphones, stop drone deliveries to inmates

General News Tweet Watch

The Justice Department will soon start trying to jam cellphones smuggled into federal prisons and used for criminal activity, part of a broader safety initiative that is also focused on preventing drones from airdropping contraband to inmates. Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein told the American Correctional Association's conference in Orlando on Monday that, while the law prohibits cellphone use by federal inmates, the Bureau of Prisons confiscated 5,116 such phones in 2016, and preliminary numbers for 2017 indicate a 28 percent increase. "That is a major safety issue," he said in his speech. "Cellphones are used to run criminal enterprises, facilitate the commission of violent crimes and thwart law enforcement." When he was the U.S. attorney in Maryland, Rosenstein prosecuted an inmate who used a smuggled cellphone to order the murder of a witness.


How will AI change the future of banking and financial services?

@machinelearnbot

Humanity has been on the road for a very long time--from the beginning, when each individual had to collect sufficient food to survive every single day--to the point where we invented agriculture. At that point, we moved from 99% survival and 1% reproduction to a brand new model. Growing food marked the introduction of leisure. Since then, every step in our evolution has proceeded along the lines of doing more and more with less and less. You might recall the 1899 story of Charles H. Duell, Commissioner of the U.S. Patent Office, lobbying President McKinley for its closure, claiming that "everything had already been invented."


Are We Ready for Robot Judges? - The Crux

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is already helping determine your future – whether it's your Netflix viewing preferences, your suitability for a mortgage or your compatibility with a prospective employer. But can we agree, at least for now, that having an AI determine your guilt or innocence in a court of law is a step too far? Worryingly, it seems this may already be happening. When American Chief Justice John Roberts recently attended an event, he was asked whether he could forsee a day "when smart machines, driven with artificial intelligences, will assist with courtroom fact finding or, more controversially even, judicial decision making". He responded: "It's a day that's here and it's putting a significant strain on how the judiciary goes about doing things".


Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper - Technology - Dunya News

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON (AFP) - Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy "smart" cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior. The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and "give an extra set of eyes" to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment. "We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs," said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a "dashcam on steroids." The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret "profiling" and misuse of data. US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.


Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper

#artificialintelligence

Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy "smart" cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior. The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and "give an extra set of eyes" to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment. "We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs," said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a "dashcam on steroids." The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret "profiling" and misuse of data. US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.


The Morning After: Weekend Edition

Engadget

If you're already holiday shopping, you're a smarter person than I. Engadget can help, as we kicked off our gift guide this week. We've also showcased some of the experiences that will be premiering at the Engadget Experience, which kicks off next Tuesday. The FBI was struggling to unlock criminals' phones again, and we all learn that aluminum foil could actually help your WiFi signal. There's science to back it up and everything. The FBI apparently didn't ask for its assistance.


The dead can unlock iPhones, offering possible clues to a killer's plan after memories go

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

See how Apple's new facial recognition system works in real life. A conductive model of a finger, used to spoof a fingerprint ID system. Created by Prof. Anil Jain, a professor of computer science at Michigan State University and expert on biometric technology. SAN FRANCISCO -- Your shiny new smartphone may unlock with only your thumbprint, eye or face. The FBI is struggling to gain access to the iPhone of Texas church gunman Devin Kelley, who killed 25 people in a shooting rampage.


Top Data Sources for Journalists in 2018 (350 Sources)

@machinelearnbot

There are many different types of sites that provide a wealth of free, freemium and paid data that can help audience developers and journalists with their reporting and storytelling efforts, The team at State of Digital Publishing would like to acknowledge these, as derived from manual searches and recognition from our existing audience. Kaggle's a site that allows users to discover machine learning while writing and sharing cloud-based code. Relying primarily on the enthusiasm of its sizable community, the site hosts dataset competitions for cash prizes and as a result it has massive amounts of data compiled into it. Whether you're looking for historical data from the New York Stock Exchange, an overview of candy production trends in the US, or cutting edge code, this site is chockful of information. It's impossible to be on the Internet for long without running into a Wikipedia article.


Resources – on automated systems and bias

#artificialintelligence

If you are a data scientist, a software developer, or in the social and human sciences with interest in digital humanities, then you're no stranger to the ongoing discussions on how algorithms embed biases, and discrimination and the call for critical and ethical engagement. This list is by no means exhaustive and as more and more awareness is being raised, there are more pieces/articles/journal papers being written on a daily basis. I plan to update these lists regularly. Also, if you think there are relevant material that I have not included, please leave them as a comment and I will add them. Weapons of math destruction: how big data increases inequality and threatens democracy by Cathy O'Neil.