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Opinion/Middendorf: Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare

#artificialintelligence

By J. William Middendorf J. William Middendorf, who lives in Little Compton, served as Secretary of the Navy during the Ford administration. His recent book is "The Great Nightfall: How We Win the New Cold War."Thirteen days passed in October 1962 while President John F. Kennedy and his advisers perched at the edge of the nuclear abyss, pondering their response to the discovery of Russian missiles in Cuba. Today, a president may not have 13 minutes. Indeed, a president may not be involved at all. "Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia, but for all humankind. It comes with colossal opportunities but also threats that are difficult to predict. Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world."


Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

There is nothing ordinary about the year 2020, and in this highly charged political year, everything gets more attention than might have been deserved in previous years. A few weeks ago, Emily Murphy, Administrator of the General Services Administration (GSA) started making waves in the news. For many who may not have known her before, she has been leading the GSA for a few years helping bring innovative programs and initiatives to the agency. Among many things that Emily Murphy is responsible for, one of the most consequential every four years is the ascertainment of a Presidential election winner so that a transition of power can proceed. That particular aspect of the GSA got a lot more news and publicity over the past few weeks than perhaps it ever has in recent history.


Opinion/Middendorf: Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare

#artificialintelligence

J. William Middendorf, who lives in Little Compton, served as Secretary of the Navy during the Ford administration. His recent book is "The Great Nightfall: How We Win the New Cold War." Thirteen days passed in October 1962 while President John F. Kennedy and his advisers perched at the edge of the nuclear abyss, pondering their response to the discovery of Russian missiles in Cuba. Today, a president may not have 13 minutes. Indeed, a president may not be involved at all. "Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia, but for all humankind. It comes with colossal opportunities but also threats that are difficult to predict. Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world."


2021 Healthcare Cybersecurity Priorities: Experts Weigh In

#artificialintelligence

Healthcare cybersecurity is in triage mode. As systems are stretched to the limits by COVID-19 and technology becomes an essential part of everyday patient interactions, hospital and healthcare IT departments have been left to figure out how to make it all work together, safely and securely. Most notably, the connectivity of everything from thermometers to defibrillators is exponentially increasing the attack surface, presenting vulnerabilities IT professionals might not even know are on their networks. Get the whole story and DOWNLOAD the eBook now – on us!] The result has been a newfound attention from ransomware and other malicious actors circling and waiting for the right time to strike. Rather than feeling overwhelmed in the current cybersecurity environment, it's important for healthcare and hospital IT teams to look at security their networks as a constant work in progress, rather than a single project with a start and end point, according to experts Jeff Horne from Ordr and G. Anthony Reina who participated in Threatpost's November webinar on Heathcare Cybersecurity. "This is a proactive space," Reina said. "This is something where you can't just be reactive. You actually have to be going out there, searching for those sorts of things, and so even on the technologies that we have, you know, we're, we're proactive about saying that security is an evolving, you know, kind of technology, It's not something where we're going to be finished." Healthcare IT pros, and security professionals more generally, also need to get a firm handle on what lives their networks and its potential level of exposure. The fine-tuned expertise of healthcare connected machines, along with the enormous cost to upgrade hardware in many instances, leave holes on a network that simply cannot be patched. "Because, from an IT perspective, you cannot manage what you can't see, and from a security perspective, you can't control and protect what you don't know," Horne said. Threatpost's experts explained how healthcare organizations can get out of triage mode and ahead of the next attack. The webinar covers everything from bread and butter patching to a brand-new secure data model which applies federated learning to functions as critical as diagnosing a brain tumor. Alternatively, a lightly edited transcript of the event follows below. Thank you so much for joining. We have an excellent conversation planned on a critically important topic, Healthcare cybersecurity. My name is Becky Bracken, I'll be your host for today's discussion. Before we get started, I want to remind you there's a widget on the upper right-hand corner of your screen where you can submit questions to our panelists at any time. We encourage you to do that. You'll have to answer questions and we want to make sure we're covering topics most interesting to you, OK, sure. Let's just introduce our panelists today. First we have Jeff Horne. Jeff is currently the CSO at Ordr and his priors include SpaceX.


Gunmen Assassinate Iran's Top Nuclear Scientist in Ambush, Provoking New Crisis

NYT > Middle East

Iranian officials, who have always maintained that their nuclear ambitions are for peaceful purposes, not weapons, expressed fury and vowed revenge over the assassination, calling it an act of terrorism and warmongering that they quickly blamed on Israeli assassins and the United States. The White House, C.I.A. and Israeli officials declined to comment. But Mr. Fakhrizadeh's assassination -- only 10 months after the United States killed the powerful spymaster at the head of Iran's security machinery in a drone attack in Iraq -- could greatly complicate President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.'s plans to reactivate the 2015 nuclear agreement between Tehran and six other nations, which curtailed Iran's nuclear activities. Mr. Biden's transition team had no immediate comment on the assassination. President Trump withdrew the United States from the nuclear accord in 2018, unraveling the signature foreign policy achievement of his predecessor, Barack Obama, and isolating the United States from Western allies who tried to keep the agreement intact.



The New Weapons Of War Are Coming As The US Military Develops Weaponized Laser Beams - Walid Shoebat

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In the original "Austin Powers" film, the character Dr. Evil asked for "sharks with frickin' laser beams attached to their heads" in order to kill Austin Powers. While this scene is ridiculous and funny, the concept of using "laser beams" as a weapon is not new. However, with the rise in technology of robotics and AI, The Drive reports that the US government has been working on the'weapons of the future', which seem to be energy-directed weapons such as laser beams. All the microelectronics and iPhones and so forth, were starting to be drilled and the touch screens were being scribed, and all this whole industrial space opened up, and the reason was that these fiber lasers were very efficient at converting electrical power to optical power. The beam quality that came out of the fiber-laser, meaning the ability for that beam to be focusable, to provide a high-intensity spot to do things, like melt metal and drill holes, the beam quality was very high.


Spent Rockets Are Dangerous Space Trash, but They Could Be the Future of Living and Working in Orbit

Mother Jones

This piece was originally published in Wired and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. In early October, a dead Soviet satellite and the abandoned upper stage of a Chinese rocket narrowly avoided a collision in low Earth orbit. If the objects had crashed, the impact would have blown them to bits and created thousands of new pieces of dangerous space debris. Only a few days prior, the European Space Agency had published its annual space environment report, which highlighted abandoned rocket bodies as one of the biggest threats to spacecraft. The best way to mitigate this risk is for launch providers to deorbit their rockets after they've delivered their payload. But if you ask Jeffrey Manber, that's a waste of a perfectly good giant metal tube.


Artificial Intelligence for the Indo-Pacific: A Blueprint for 2030

#artificialintelligence

As even the most inattentive observer of contemporary international politics will attest, technological competition – mostly, but not always, between the U.S. and its allies on one hand, and China and Russia on the other – has once again risen to the fore. Analysts, so far, have approached this issue from various angles: what it means in terms of military balances, the possibility of international cooperation, what a technological edge implies for domestic policies, and so on. The outgoing Trump administration has made technological contestation with China a cornerstone of its strategic policy, emphasizing the need for the United States to maintain its edge when it comes to artificial intelligence (AI), quantum information science, and aerospace and other critical technologies, among others. Other Indo-Pacific powers, such as Australia, India, and Japan, have also joined the fray in pushing both new and emerging tech at home as well as promoting collaboration around it between "like-minded countries." In June this year, a Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence of 14 states along with the European Union was launched, to facilitate collective AI research as well as implementation.


Robots on the rise as Americans experience record job losses amid pandemic

The Guardian

They can check you in and deliver orange juice to your hotel room, answer your questions about a missing package, whip up sushi and pack up thousands of subscription boxes. And, perhaps most importantly, they are completely immune to Covid-19. While people have had a hard time in the coronavirus pandemic, robots are having a moment. The Covid-19 pandemic has left millions of Americans unemployed – disproportionately those in the service industries where women and people of color make up the largest share of the labor force. In October, 11 million people were unemployed in the US, compared with about 6 million people who were without a job during the same time last year.