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The Future of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Federal agencies aim to advance their use of artificial intelligence and accompanying emerging technologies, like machine learning, in the coming years. While there are some examples of nascent uses of AI across government already, agencies are aware they must set goals and prioritize policies that intelligently usher in the technology before its maximum potential can be fulfilled. The U.S. Postal Service, for example, will focus on AI and its potential over the coming decade to better serve its hundreds of millions of customers. Similarly, the Department of Homeland Security's science and tech arm spent almost a year drafting an artificial intelligence and machine learning framework that will guide the agency's enterprisewide pursuits of those technologies for the coming years. The government's standard-setting body, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, is engaging external stakeholders as it works to develop an AI risk management framework that could later inform and benefit agencies seeking to make use of the emerging technology.


U.S. offers payments and relocation to family of Afghans killed in botched drone attack

The Japan Times

The Pentagon has offered unspecified condolence payments to the family of 10 civilians who were killed in a botched U.S. drone attack in Afghanistan in August during the final days before American troops withdrew from the country. The U.S. Defense Department said it made a commitment that included offering "ex-gratia condolence payments," in addition to working with the U.S. State Department in support of the family members who were interested in relocation to the United States. Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, held a virtual meeting on Thursday with Steven Kwon, the founder and president of Nutrition & Education International, the aid organization that employed Zemari Ahmadi, who was killed in the Aug. 29 drone attack, Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby said late on Friday. Ahmadi and others who were killed in the strike were innocent victims who bore no blame and were not affiliated with Islamic State Khorasan or threats to U.S. forces, Kirby said. The drone strike in Kabul killed as many as 10 civilians, including seven children.


US offers to pay families of Afghans killed in drone attack

Al Jazeera

The Pentagon has offered unspecified condolence payments to the family of 10 civilians who were killed in a botched US drone attack in Afghanistan in August during the final days before American troops withdrew from the country. The US Department of Defense said it made a commitment that included offering "ex-gratia condolence payments", in addition to working with the US Department of State in support of the family members who were interested in relocation to the United States. Colin Kahl, the US under-secretary of defense for policy, held a virtual meeting on Thursday with Steven Kwon, the founder and president of Nutrition & Education International, the aid organisation that employed Zemari Ahmadi, who was killed in the August 29 drone attack, Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said late on Friday. Ahmadi and others who were killed in the drone raid were innocent victims who bore no blame and were not affiliated with Islamic State in Khorasan Province, ISKP (ISIS-K) or threats to US forces, Kirby said. The drone raid in Kabul killed as many as 10 civilians, including seven children.


Startup Reliable Robotics receives $100M in funding to replace pilots with robots

The Independent - Tech

A new startup that replaces pilots with robots has received $100 million in funding. Reliable Robotics argues that, with many planes now being controlled automatically, that pilots are the most expensive aspects of cargo operations. Trucking is monotonous and uninteresting work, meaning it is also the source of the most mistakes. Its technology is aimed at handling the taxi, takeoff, landing, and parking parts of cargo flights – monitored by licensed pilots remotely in the control centre. It is claimed that autonomous planes could save airlines approximately $60 billion per year.


Tech experts warn lawmakers about bias in artificial intelligence systems

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has transformed the way we live our everyday lives but tech experts this week warned member of Congress that the systems can have bias, which can lead to unintended consequences for millions of Americans. "AI is increasingly becoming a critical part of our daily lives," said Miriam Vogel, President and CEO of EqualAI. "We think each touch point is also an opportunity to identify and eliminate harmful biases." Bias in AI systems can be especially harmful in financial services. "For example, if you feed in data on who's gotten a mortgage in the past in the United States and ask the computer to make similar decisions in the future, you will get an AI that offers more mortgages to white people than people of color," said Meredith Broussard, an Associate Professor at New York University.


Artificial Intelligence: The Terminator of Truth

#artificialintelligence

Science fiction movies like "Blade Runner" and "The Terminator" have defined the perception of artificial intelligence within popular culture. For most people, the term AI conjures up images of a dystopian future dominated by humanoid robots that have taken over the world. This common conception leads to the dismissal of the technology as impossible, or at least faroff in the future. Few people realize that we are already delving into a world dominated by AI, and it's nothing like "The Terminator." The actual risks posed by artificial intelligence have nothing to do with killer robots; they relate to the machine-learning algorithms that recommend content on the internet.


First U.S. Chief Software Officer resigns to sound alarm that U.S. must outcompete China

FOX News

October 14, 2021 – On September 7, U.S. Air Force Chief Software Officer Nicolas Chaillan resigned in a post on Linked in titled, "It is time to say Goodbye!" "I realize more clearly than ever before," he wrote, "that in 20 years from now, our children...will have no chance competing in a world where China has the drastic advantage of population over the US." Chaillan told'Fox & Friends First' Thursday that his goal in resigning was not to admit defeat, but to implore people to understand that'we're running out of time.' "If we do not take action right now, we will be facing a situation where we will not be able to catch up." "I resigned," he said, "because I wanted to raise the alarm and ensure we take action before it is too late." The issue, Chaillan believes, lies in part with top U.S. officials: "The reports coming out from the Pentagon saying that China is catching up...when really it is now a real threat to our democracy" he said. STEPHEN MOORE: BIDEN THINKS CLIMATE CHANGE IS A BIGGER THREAT THAN CHINA. Chaillan joined the Pentagon as Chief Software Officer in 2019, the first to hold that title. There, he quickly identified a key difference between the way the U.S. and China interact with their private-sector technology companies.


US military may get a dog-like robot armed with a sniper rifle

New Scientist

The US military may be getting a dog-like quadruped robot armed with a sniper rifle. The robot, developed by Ghost Robotics of Philadelphia, is a new version of its Vision series of legged robots. The US Air Force is currently testing an unarmed version of these robots for use as perimeter security at the Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Ghost Robotics displayed the armed version at the annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army held in Washington DC this week. The robot is fitted with a Special Purpose Unmanned Rifle pod from Sword Defense, with a powerful 6.5mm sniper rifle.


Military robot dogs seen with assault rifles attached to their backs

The Independent - Tech

Military security firm Ghost Robotics has built a mechanical dog capable of carrying a remote-controlled rifle on its back. The Special Purpose Unmanned Rifle (SPUR) is comprised of a 6.5mm Creedmore rifle from weapons company SWORD International combined with the quadruped unmanned ground vehicle from the robotics firm. First seen at the US Army's annual convention in Washington DC, as reported by The Drive, this is apparently one of the first systems like these with an actual weapon attached. It is unclear how much ammunition the gun contains, and how difficult it might be to reload. Ghost Robotics says that the robot dog can be commanded to chamber the first round from an unloaded state, clear the chamber, and'safeing' the gun (when the weapon is not cocked and no ammunition is present). It can fire bullets up to a 1200-metre distance.


Killer bot? Terrifying robot dog fitted with a 6.5mm sniper RIFLE unveiled at the US Army trade show

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robot dog design armed with a 6.5 mm Creedmoor sniper rifle capable of precisely hitting targets from 3,940 feet away has been unveiled at the US Army trade show. The'Special Purpose Unmanned Rifle' (SPUR) is the brainchild of Philadelphia-based Ghost Robotics and arms manufacturer SWORD International of Sparks, Nevada. Placed on top of one of Ghost Robotics' existing'quadrupedal unmanned ground vehicle' designs, SPUR can be remotely instructed to load, unload and fire its rifle. The firms have yet to reveal the exact configuration of the weapon, nor how much ammunition the machine is capable of carrying or its reload rate. However, tests have shown that the 6.5mm rounds used in the Creedmoor rifle offer an increase in range over the 7.62x51mm cartridges currently used by US forces. It is also presently unclear how much each robot unit and SPUR attachment will cost to purchase and maintain.