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Mayo Clinic AI algorithm proves effective at spotting early-stage heart disease in routine EKG data

#artificialintelligence

It still remains to be seen whether the sci-fi genre is correct and artificial intelligence will one day rise up against the human race, but in the meantime, AI just might save your life. An algorithm developed by the Mayo Clinic can significantly increase the number of cases of low ejection fraction caught in its earliest stages, when it's still most treatable, according to a study published this month in Nature Medicine. The condition, in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood from its chamber with each contraction, is associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure and is often symptomless in its early stages. Traditionally, the only way to diagnose low ejection fraction is with the use of an echocardiogram, a time-consuming and expensive cardiac ultrasound. The Mayo Clinic's AI algorithm, however, can screen for low ejection fraction in a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (EKG) reading, which is a much faster and more readily available tool. In the study, more than 22,600 patients received an EKG as part of their usual primary care checkups, then were randomly assigned to have their results analyzed by the AI or by a physician as usual.


Gigantic kites flown by robots could harness Mars's strong winds and power human colonies

Daily Mail - Science & tech

With NASA aiming to get humans to Mars by 2030, the idea of a long-term settlement on the Red Planet is getting closer to reality and scientists are working on innovated ways to power these habitats. Researchers in the Netherlands propose using massive kites to harness high Martian winds that would transformed into energy for colonists. The kite is attached by cable to a spindle. Similar kites are being developed to harness wind power on Earth, but these would be much larger, with a surface area of 530 square feet. Wind turbines and batteries are too heavy to bring to Mars via rocket, and the planet doesn't get enough sunlight to consider solar power.


Home video shows driver entering front door before deadly Tesla crash, NTSB says

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Federal investigators said Monday they were able to glean some insights into what might have happened after a fire erupted from a Tesla crash that killed two people in the Houston area in April and destroyed the vehicle's data recorder. . The National Transportation Safety Board released preliminary findings from its probe into the crash, which raised speculation about whether the vehicle's partially self-driving system, Autopilot, was to blame. The speculation stemmed from local authorities saying they were nearly positive that no one was behind the wheel when the vehicle crashed. The NTSB, in its preliminary report, said video footage from the vehicle owner's home security system showed him getting behind the wheel of the Tesla Model S and then slowly exiting the driveway. The vehicle traveled about 550 feet "before departing the road on a curve, driving over the curb, and hitting a drainage culvert, a raised manhole and a tree," according to the NTSB.


NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission will leave asteroid Bennu TODAY

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission will leave asteroid Bennu today and begin its 1.4 billion mile, two year long journey back to the Earth, the space agency confirmed. OSIRIS-REx (the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer) was the first NASA mission to visit a near-Earth asteroid, survey the surface, and collect a sample to deliver to Earth. The spaceship was sent to study Bennu, an asteroid around the size of the Empire State Building and 200 million miles away, between the orbit of Earth and Mars. OSIRIS-REx gathered 2.1 ounces (60 grams) of rock and dust during its land and grab mission to the surface of the giant space rock, filling its storage compartment. It will begin its long journey home at 21:00 BST (16:00 EDT), with a live broadcast from NASA sharing the moment it fires its thrusters to push away from Bennu's orbit. If all goes to plan, OSIRIS-REx will orbit the sun twice, travelling 1.4 billion miles as it lines up with Earth, returning its samples in Utah on September 24, 2023.


The Pentagon Inches Toward Letting AI Control Weapons

WIRED

Last August, several dozen military drones and tank-like robots took to the skies and roads 40 miles south of Seattle. Their mission: Find terrorists suspected of hiding among several buildings. So many robots were involved in the operation that no human operator could keep a close eye on all of them. So they were given instructions to find--and eliminate--enemy combatants when necessary. The mission was just an exercise, organized by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a blue-sky research division of the Pentagon; the robots were armed with nothing more lethal than radio transmitters designed to simulate interactions with both friendly and enemy robots.


NASA Releases Hi-Res Video, Audio Of Mars Helicopter Flying Across Red Planet

International Business Times

NASA's Perseverance Mars rover has achieved yet another first after capturing the sounds of another spacecraft hovering on the red planet. Using the microphone on its rock-zapping SuperCam instrument, the six-wheeled robot listened to the sounds of the Ingenuity helicopter on April 30 and recorded the whirring of its fast-spinning rotors. This marked the first time a spacecraft has recorded audio of another probe on a world beyond Earth. This was the chopper's fourth flight since Perseverance and Ingenuity landed together on Feb. 18 on the floor of Mars' Jezero Crater, NASA said in a statement. A video recently released by NASA combined the footage from Perseverance's Mastcam-Z imager of the solar-powered helicopter with the recorded audio, allowing scientists to know how the robot is performing just by tuning in to the sound it makes.


Israel shared Iranian General Soleimani's cell phones with US intelligence before drone strike: report

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Israel shared three cell phone numbers used by Qasem Soleimani with U.S. intelligence in the hours before American drones unleashed Hellfire missiles on the Iranian general last year, Yahoo News reported Saturday. The revelation sheds new light on the role that Israel played in the killing of Soleimani, who the State Department says was responsible for hundreds of U.S. troop deaths as the head of the Revolutionary Guard's elite Quds Force. The drone strike occurred shortly after midnight on Jan. 2, 2020, as Soleimani and his entourage were leaving Baghdad's international airport.


European Commission Proposes Regulation on Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

AI is defined as software that is developed with one or more specified techniques and approaches (including machine learning and deep learning) that can, for a given set of human-defined objectives, generate outputs such as content, predictions, recommendations or decisions influencing the environments they interact with.


Feature stores – how to avoid feeling that every day is Groundhog Day - KDnuggets

#artificialintelligence

Work as a data scientist follows a cycle: log in, clean data, define features, test and build a model, and make sure the model is running smoothly. Sounds straightforward enough, except not all parts of the cycle are created equal: data preparation takes 80% of any given data scientist's time. No matter what project you're working on, most days you're cleaning data and converting raw data into features that machine learning models can understand. The monotonous hole of data prep blends hours together and makes each day of work feel identical to the one before it. Why can't you do this tedious process more effectively?


Microsoft Will Soon Kill Flash on Windows 10 for Good

WIRED

The most recent big iOS update, which makes it easier to opt out of ads that track you across apps and web sites, has sent the digital marketing industry into a bit of a tizzy. That includes Facebook, which has been telling users that tracking helps keep its services "free of charge." Facebook is doing just fine, and choosing to preserve your privacy is not going to result in an Instagram service fee. Elsewhere in social media privacy news, Twitter rolled out a so-called Tip Jar this week that lets you send money to your favorite users. But it failed to vet how PayPal handles payments, potentially exposing users' home or email addresses when they send or receive a tip.