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DARPA says industry interest in AI Next campaign is 'very good, solid' - FedScoop

#artificialintelligence

Despite a summer of controversy surrounding the use of artificial intelligence for military purposes, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency says it has no problem garnering interest in its AI research projects. "We don't see that we are having problems engaging with industry," Valerie Browning, director of the Defense Science office at DARPA, said on a Washington Post event panel last week. DARPA recently announced a $2 billion campaign called "AI Next" aimed at "third wave" AI research. The goal is to get the technology to a place where machines adapt to changing situations the way human intelligence does. Responding to a question about whether and how Google's decision to end its work with Pentagon AI initiative Project Maven has impacted DARPA, Browning downplayed any effect.


10 free online writing courses for getting real good at words

Mashable

Writing is a much-prized skill and a difficult one to master and, while some are naturally gifted in stringing sentences together, we all need to take the time to learn the craft. Whether you want to write your first novel, pen a poignant poem, pull together a screenplay, or create better business content, there is a free, online course out there to help. We've rounded up a list of free, online writing courses so you can find the perfect program of study to help you write gooderer. This eight-week online writing course is an introduction to the theory and practice of rhetoric, the art of persuasive writing and speech. Using selected speeches from prominent 20th-century Americans -- including Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, Margaret Chase Smith, and Ronald Reagan -- to explore and analyze rhetorical structure and style, this course will teach you when and how to employ a variety of rhetorical devices in writing and speaking.


The Morning After: SpaceX's Starship secures a lunar lander deal with NASA

Engadget

While we continue to wait for news about the Mars copter's first test flight, Elon Musk and SpaceX closed out the week with a big win, scoring a contract from NASA to use Starship as a lander for the Artemis lunar program. The company beat out Blue Origin (which teamed up with key aerospace players like Lockheed Martin) and defense contractor Dynetics to secure the $2.9 billion contract. There are still funding hurdles for NASA to clear if it plans to fly as scheduled, but those missions are still years away at best. In the nearer future, Apple's Spring Loaded event is scheduled to take place on Tuesday and Chris Velazco has reminders of the rumors you should know about before it starts. New iPads and iMacs seem like safe bets, but we'll see if there are any big surprises in a few days.


Poppy Gustafsson: the Darktrace tycoon in new cybersecurity era

The Guardian

Poppy Gustafsson runs a cutting-edge and gender-diverse cybersecurity firm on the brink of a £3bn stock market debut, but she is happy to reference pop culture classic the Terminator to help describe what Darktrace actually does. Launched in Cambridge eight years ago by an unlikely alliance of mathematicians, former spies from GCHQ and the US and artificial intelligence (AI) experts, Darktrace provides protection, enabling businesses to stay one step ahead of increasingly smarter and dangerous hackers and viruses. Marketing its products as the digital equivalent of the human body's ability to fight illness, Darktrace's AI-security works as an "enterprise immune system", can "self-learn and self-heal" and has an "autonomous response capability" to tackle threats without instruction as they are detected. "It really does feel like we're in this new era of cybersecurity," says Gustafsson, the chief executive of Darktrace. "The arms race will absolutely continue, I really don't think it's very long until this [AI] innovation gets into the hands of attackers, and we will see these very highly targeted and specific attacks that humans won't necessarily be able to spot and defend themselves from. "It's not going to be these futuristic Terminator-style robots out shooting each other, it's going to be all these little pieces of code fighting in the background of our businesses.


FDA Authorizes Marketing of First Device that Uses Artificial Intelligence to Help Detect Potential Signs of Colon Cancer

#artificialintelligence

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized marketing of the GI Genius, the first device that uses artificial intelligence (AI) based on machine learning to assist clinicians in detecting lesions (such as polyps or suspected tumors) in the colon in real time during a colonoscopy. "Artificial intelligence has the potential to transform health care to better assist health care providers and improve patient care. When AI is combined with traditional screenings or surveillance methods, it could help find problems early on, when they may be easier to treat," said Courtney H. Lias, Ph.D. acting director of the GastroRenal, ObGyn, General Hospital and Urology Devices Office in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "Studies show that during colorectal cancer screenings, missed lesions can be a problem even for well-trained clinicians. With the FDA's authorization of this device today, clinicians now have a tool that could help improve their ability to detect gastrointestinal lesions they may have missed otherwise."


Human decisions still needed in artificial intelligence for war

#artificialintelligence

US President Joe Biden should not heed the advice of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) to reject calls for a global ban on autonomous weapons. Instead, Biden should work on an innovative approach to prevent humanity from relinquishing its judgment to algorithms during war. The NSCAI maintains that a global treaty that prohibits the development, deployment and use of artificial intelligence (AI) enabled weapons systems is not in the interests of the United States and would harm international security. It argues that Russia and China are unlikely to follow such a treaty. A global ban, it argues, would increase pressure on law-abiding nations and would enable others to utilise AI military systems in an unsafe and unethical manner.


Shine some light in black box of algorithms used by government

#artificialintelligence

AB 13 would set criteria to minimize unfair, biased or discriminatory decisions by artificial intelligence systems used by government. Assemblymember Ed Chau, a Democrat from Monterey Park, represents Assembly District 49, Assemblymember.Chau@assembly.ca.gov. Chau introduced Assembly Bill 13 and is chair of the Assembly Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection. Debra Gore-Mann is president and CEO of The Greenlining Institute, debra.goremann@greenlining.org. The Greenlining Institute is sponsoring Assembly Bill 13.


The Morning After: Touring Mercedes' very luxurious EV

Engadget

This "S-Class of EVs" is the first full-electric car from Mercedes to come to the US, combining a low drag coefficient with a large battery pack for a range of 478 miles, using Europe's WLTP estimate. Tesla, Porsche and Audi already have electric luxury sedans, but this looks like an interesting and extremely classy competitor. Roberto Baldwin is ready to walk us through the features and its futuristic interior, which includes a biometric sensor for logging in with voice or fingerprint. There's no word on how much it will cost, and we haven't taken it on the road yet, but I'm already digging its unique taillights and fastback hatch. It's barely been a month since DJI unveiled a new drone, and the company already has another to show.


US Sanctions on Russia Rewrite Cyberespionage's Rules

WIRED

Less than four months after the revelation of one of the biggest hacking events in history--Russia's massive breach of thousands of networks that's come to be known as the SolarWinds hack--the US has now sent the Kremlin a message in the form of a punishing package of diplomatic and economic measures. But even as the retribution for SolarWinds becomes clear, the question remains: What exactly is that message? By most any interpretation, it doesn't seem to be based on a rule that the United States has ever spelled out before. On Thursday, the Biden administration fulfilled its repeated promises of retaliation for both the SolarWinds hacking campaign and a broad array of other Russian misbehavior that includes the Kremlin's continuing disinformation operations and other interference in the 2020 election, the poisoning of Putin political adversary Aleksey Navalny, and even older Russian misdeeds including the NotPetya worm and the cyberattack on the 2018 Winter Olympics. The Treasury Department has leveled new sanctions at six cybersecurity companies with purported ties to Russian intelligence services, as well as four organizations associated with its disinformation operations.


Katz School of Science and Health Will Offer M.S. in Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

In Yeshiva University's engineering-focused M.S. in Artificial Intelligence (AI), offered by the Katz School of Science and Health, students will learn the key skills most valued in today's marketplace, including machine learning and deep neural networks, along with cutting-edge technologies such as reinforcement learning, voice recognition and generation, and image recognition and generation. In the program's project-based courses, students will build systems, models and algorithms using the best available artificial intelligence design patterns and engineering principles, all done in the heart of Manhattan, a global epicenter for artificial intelligence work and research. Prof. Andrew Catlin is the program director for the AI program, with a background as a data scientist and production systems developer who has worked with such major clients as Fidelity Investments; Smart Money; Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette; Manufacturers Hanover Trust; and the National Football League. He is also a founder of multiple tech startups, including Hudson Technology and Metrics Reporting. He teaches graduate courses in recommender systems, natural language processing and neural networks, among others.