Results


Most Shocking Deepfake Videos Of 2021

#artificialintelligence

Only, it was a deepfake. So was the video of Donald Trump taunting Belgium for remaining in the Paris climate agreement and Barack Obama's public service announcement as posted by Buzzfeed. These great examples of deepfakes are the 21st Century's answer to Photoshopped images and videos. Synthetic media, deepfakes, use artificial intelligence (AI) -- deep learning technology, to replace an existing person in an image or video with someone else. One reason for the widespread use of deepfake technology in popular celebrities is that these personalities have a large number of pictures available on the internet, allowing AI to train and learn from.


Deepfake: A new formula for Phishing?

#artificialintelligence

Phishing is the activity of a site appearing as another, and trying to deceive the user of the site into mistaking the attacker's site as the one the user wants to use. This has caused an infinite number of fraudulent transactions and other criminal activities. Now think what happens if the person that you think you are looking at in an online video, is not the same person at all. It is a digitally rendered copy of the person, however, this time it's not just a still, it's a moving, talking video of the person with features almost indistinguishable from the person that it is supposed to be. Read along to find more on what I'm talking about.


New California bill makes it illegal to create deepfake porn of someone without their consent

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new California law will ban the creation and distribution of deepfake pornography produced without the consent of the person it depicts. Statutory damages range between $1,500 and $30,000, while cases in which malice can be demonstrated, damages rise to $150,000. The bill is part of a larger deepfake package that will also make it illegal to create and distribute deepfake videos of political figures within 60 days of an election. Katy Perry's face (pictured above) was swapped onto an adult film actress' body for a short video, something that the new California law will make illegal. Almost all deepfake videos are circulated online are pornographic, with one study suggesting the figure is 96 percent.


'Deepfakes' are becoming more realistic, and could signal the next wave of attacks on politicians

#artificialintelligence

When Peter Cushing turned to face the camera in Rogue One, Star Wars fans were as excited as they were confused. After all, the actor had died more than 20 years earlier, and yet, there was no mistaking him. For a major Hollywood movie, this is a clever trick. But not everyone is trying to entertain us, and you don't need a million-dollar budget to deceive. "You take the face of one person and put it on the body of another," said Jeff Smith, associate director at the National Center for Media Forensics at the University of Colorado Denver.


Hackers or state actors could use 'deepfake' medium with devastating consequences

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - If you see a video of a politician speaking words he never would utter, or a Hollywood star improbably appearing in a cheap adult movie, don't adjust your television set -- you may just be witnessing the future of "fake news." "Deepfake" videos that manipulate reality are becoming more sophisticated due to advances in artificial intelligence, creating the potential for new kinds of misinformation with devastating consequences. As the technology advances, worries are growing about how deepfakes can be used for nefarious purposes by hackers or state actors. "We're not quite to the stage where we are seeing deepfakes weaponized, but that moment is coming," said Robert Chesney, a University of Texas law professor who has researched the topic. Chesney argues that deepfakes could add to the current turmoil over disinformation and influence operations.


Misinformation woes could multiply with 'deepfake' videos

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you see a video of a politician speaking words he never would utter, or a Hollywood star improbably appearing in a cheap adult movie, don't adjust your television set -- you may just be witnessing the future of'fake news.' 'Deepfake' videos that manipulate reality are becoming more sophisticated due to advances in artificial intelligence, creating the potential for new kinds of misinformation with devastating consequences. As the technology advances, worries are growing about how deepfakes can be used for nefarious purposes by hackers or state actors. Paul Scharre of the Center for a New American Security looks at a'deepfake' video of former US President Barack Obama manipulated to show him speaking words from actor Jordan Peele on January 24, 2019, in Washington'We're not quite to the stage where we are seeing deepfakes weaponized, but that moment is coming,' Robert Chesney, a University of Texas law professor who has researched the topic, told AFP. Chesney argues that deepfakes could add to the current turmoil over disinformation and influence operations. 'A well-timed and thoughtfully scripted deepfake or series of deepfakes could tip an election, spark violence in a city primed for civil unrest, bolster insurgent narratives about an enemy's supposed atrocities, or exacerbate political divisions in a society,' Chesney and University of Maryland professor Danielle Citron said in a blog post for the Council on Foreign Relations.


Fake media is coming for our memories

#artificialintelligence

And because of this fact, we're screwed. Due to advances in artificial intelligence, it's now possible to convincingly map anyone's face onto the body of another person in a video. As Vox's Aja Romano has explained, this technique is becoming more common in pornography: An actress's head can be mapped onto a porn actress's body. These "deepfakes" can be generated with free software, and they're different from the photoshopping of the past. This is live action -- and uncannily real. On Tuesday, BuzzFeed published a demonstration featuring the actor and director Jordan Peele.


Go With the Flow, on Jupiter and Snow. Coherence From Model-Free Video Data without Trajectories

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Viewing a data set such as the clouds of Jupiter, coherence is readily apparent to human observers, especially the Great Red Spot, but also other great storms and persistent structures. There are now many different definitions and perspectives mathematically describing coherent structures, but we will take an image processing perspective here. We describe an image processing perspective inference of coherent sets from a fluidic system directly from image data, without attempting to first model underlying flow fields, related to a concept in image processing called motion tracking. In contrast to standard spectral methods for image processing which are generally related to a symmetric affinity matrix, leading to standard spectral graph theory, we need a not symmetric affinity which arises naturally from the underlying arrow of time. We develop an anisotropic, directed diffusion operator corresponding to flow on a directed graph, from a directed affinity matrix developed with coherence in mind, and corresponding spectral graph theory from the graph Laplacian. Our methodology is not offered as more accurate than other traditional methods of finding coherent sets, but rather our approach works with alternative kinds of data sets, in the absence of vector field. Our examples will include partitioning the weather and cloud structures of Jupiter, and a local to Potsdam, N.Y. lake-effect snow event on Earth, as well as the benchmark test double-gyre system.