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How Trump can destroy Kim Jong Un's nukes without blowing up the world

#artificialintelligence

In the long view of history, North Korea getting a nuclear-tipped intercontinental missile in 2017 is the rough equivalent of an army showing up for World War II riding horses and shooting muskets. Nukes are so last century. War is changing, driven by cyberweapons, artificial intelligence (AI) and robots. Weapons of mass destruction are dumb, soon to be whipped by smart weapons of pinpoint disruption--which nations can use without risking annihilation of the human race. If the U.S. is innovative and forward-thinking, it can develop technology that ensures no ill-behaving government could ever get a nuke off the ground.



AI is coming to war, regardless of Elon Musk's well-meaning concern

#artificialintelligence

Participants run ahead of Puerto de San Lorenzo's fighting bulls during the third bull run of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, northern Spain. Each day at 8:00 am hundreds of people race with six bulls, charging along a winding, 848.6-metre (more than half a mile) course through narrow streets to the city's bull ring, where the animals are killed in a bullfight or corrida, during this festival, immortalised in Ernest Hemingway's 1926 novel "The Sun Also Rises" and dating back to medieval times and also featuring religious processions, folk dancing, concerts and round-the-clock drinking. Iraqi women, who fled the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists in the Old City of Mosul, cry as they stand in the city's western industrial district awaiting to be relocated


No one wants an arms race, but high-tech weapons are America's best shot at containing North Korea

Los Angeles Times

With threats, bribes, diplomacy and sanctions, American presidents of both parties have sought for 25 years to try to halt, or at least slow, North Korea's quest for a nuclear arsenal -- to no avail. Though the brinksmanship of the last few weeks has subsided, President Trump still faces the prospect of a madman -- Kim Jong Un -- in control of a nuclear arsenal. What the United States and its allies must now do is find options between conventional war, or even nuclear holocaust, on the one hand, and appeasement on the other. The answer could be robotic, cyber, and space weapons -- if we have the will to deploy them. They already have been used for pinpoint strikes on terrorist leaders and insurgent forces in the Mideast.


U.S. Army to deploy attack drone system to South Korea as Pyongyang tensions surge

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Army is permanently stationing an attack drone system and its support personnel in South Korea amid ongoing tensions with the North, a Pentagon spokesman said Monday. Officials said the deployment, due by next year, was not unique to South Korea and was being conducted across the Army to provide infantry divisions with better intelligence. But the announcement comes just one week after Pyongyang launched four ballistic missiles in its latest provocative test. "The U.S. Army, after coordination with the Republic of Korea Armed Forces and the U.S. Air Force, has begun the process to permanently station a Gray Eagle Unmanned Aerial Systems company at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea," Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. The sensor-rich MQ-1C Gray Eagle is capable of carrying Stinger and Hellfire missiles, as well as other armaments.


UN says N. Korea accusations vs US troops 'unsubstantiated'

Associated Press

The American-led U.N. command on Saturday dismissed as unsubstantiated accusations from North Korea that U.S. troops at a border village tried to provoke its frontline troops with "disgusting acts." It also said that American troops encouraged South Korean soldiers to aim their guns at the North. North Korea occasionally accuses South Korean and U.S. troops of trying to provoke its border troops and vice versa. After North Korea's first nuclear bomb test in 2006, the U.S. accused North Korean troops of spitting across the border's demarcation line, making throat-slashing hand gestures and flashing their middle fingers.


North Korean accusations of 'disgusting acts' by U.S. troops lack evidence, U.N. command says

The Japan Times

SEOUL/UNITED NATIONS – The American-led U.N. command on Saturday dismissed accusations from North Korea that U.S. troops at a border village tried to provoke its front-line troops with "disgusting acts." A North Korean military statement Friday warned U.S. soldiers to stop what it called "hooliganism" at Panmunjom or they will meet a "dog's death any time and any place." It said U.S. troops pointed their fingers at North Korean soldiers and made strange noises and unspecified "disgusting" facial expressions. It also said American troops encouraged South Korean soldiers to aim their guns at the North. Christopher Bush, a spokesman for the U.N. command, said it had looked into the allegations and determined they were unsubstantiated.


North Korea accuses US soldiers of provoking border troops

U.S. News

North Korea on Friday accused U.S. soldiers of trying to provoke its frontline troops with "disgusting" acts and encouraging South Korean soldiers to aim their guns at the North. A North Korean military statement warned U.S. soldiers to stop what it called "hooliganism" at the inter-Korean border village of Panmunjom or they'll meet a "dog's death any time and any place." "GIs hurled fully armed MPs of the South Korean puppet army into perpetrating such dangerous provocations as aiming at" the North Korean military side last week, said the statement carried by Pyongyang's official Korean Central News Agency. It said U.S. troops pointed their fingers at North Korean soldiers and made strange noises and unspecified "disgusting" facial expressions. North Korea occasionally accuses South Korean and U.S. troops of trying to provoke its border troops and vice versa.