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Artificial Intelligence (AI) Trust Measurement » Brinkwire

#artificialintelligence

Public trust in AI varies greatly depending on the application, according to researchers. The rise of artificial intelligence (AI) in society prompted University of Tokyo researchers to investigate public attitudes toward AI ethics. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios influence these attitudes. The team developed an octagonal visual metric, similar to a rating system, as part of this research, which could be useful to AI researchers who want to know how their work is perceived by the general public. Many people believe that technology's rapid advancement outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law and ethics.


Measuring Trust in Artificial Intelligence (AI)

#artificialintelligence

Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics. AI in particular exemplifies this as it has become so pervasive in everyday life for so many, seemingly overnight.


Measuring trust in AI

#artificialintelligence

Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics. AI in particular exemplifies this as it has become so pervasive in everyday life for so many, seemingly overnight.


Data reveals people do not trust AI weapons

#artificialintelligence

New Tokyo based research finds that public trust in AI varies widely depending on the person and application. Researchers at the University of Tokyo have shown how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect attitudes towards artificial intelligence. The complexity of Artificial Intelligence compared to more familiar technology can seem frightening, unfamiliar technology can breed fear and mistrust. Technology progresses at such a rapid pace that it threatens to move past the laws put in place to regulate it therefore for the study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric similar to that of a rating system, in order to fully understand the intricacies of public opinion on the safety of AI. There were two questions the team sought to answer through their surveys: how attitudes change depending on the scenario presented to a respondent, and how the demographic of the respondent themselves changed attitudes.


Researchers find public trust in AI varies greatly depending on the application

#artificialintelligence

Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics. AI in particular exemplifies this as it has become so pervasive in everyday life for so many, seemingly overnight.


Measuring Trust in AI

#artificialintelligence

Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics. AI in particular exemplifies this as it has become so pervasive in everyday life for so many, seemingly overnight.


Measuring Trust in Artificial Intelligence (AI)

#artificialintelligence

Researchers find public trust in AI varies greatly depending on the application. Prompted by the increasing prominence of artificial intelligence (AI) in society, University of Tokyo researchers investigated public attitudes toward the ethics of AI. Their findings quantify how different demographics and ethical scenarios affect these attitudes. As part of this study, the team developed an octagonal visual metric, analogous to a rating system, which could be useful to AI researchers who wish to know how their work may be perceived by the public. Many people feel the rapid development of technology often outpaces that of the social structures that implicitly guide and regulate it, such as law or ethics.


Closer hardware systems bring the future of artificial intelligence into view

#artificialintelligence

IMAGE: Researchers from the Institute of Industrial Science at The University of Tokyo, Kobe Steel, Ltd, and Kobelco Research Institute, Inc, develop high-density, energy-efficient 3D embedded RAM for artificial intelligence applications.... view more Tokyo - Machine learning is the process by which computers adapt their responses without human intervention. This form of artificial intelligence (AI) is now common in everyday tools such as virtual assistants and is being developed for use in areas from medicine to agriculture. A challenge posed by the rapid expansion of machine learning is the high energy demand of the complex computing processes. Researchers from The University of Tokyo have reported the first integration of a mobility-enhanced field-effect transistor (FET) and a ferroelectric capacitor (FE-CAP) to bring the memory system into the proximity of a microprocessor and improve the efficiency of the data-intensive computing system. Their findings were presented at the 2021 Symposium on VLSI Technology.


Overseas students in Japan face bleak job outlook due to pandemic

The Japan Times

Osaka – Many foreign students in Japan who hope to find a job in the country are facing an uphill battle, with a pandemic-driven economic downturn having led many businesses to cut recruitment. The development raises concerns about a potential outflow to other countries of promising foreign workers accustomed to Japanese culture and language as the world's third-largest economy grapples with a rapidly graying population. According to a survey conducted in July by career information provider Disco Inc., 68.5 percent of 343 international students who responded to the questionnaire and were set to obtain their degrees next March were still without a job offer, up 9.1 percentage points from a year earlier. The figure compared with 22.3 percent of 1,230 Japanese students without a job offer as of July, according to the Tokyo-based company. International Students Support Network, a group that advises companies interested in hiring overseas personnel, said a loss of job opportunities was evident in almost all industries, particularly in the tourism and retail sectors.


Virus cuts off educational support for Japan's children of foreign descent

The Japan Times

Around 70 percent of about 100 nonprofit groups and individuals offering educational support to children of foreign descent across Japan have stopped or cut back on their operations amid the coronavirus epidemic, an online poll showed. The poll -- conducted by the Youth Support Center in Fussa, western Tokyo, between April 15 and 21 -- targeted groups and individuals nationwide that help children with foreign roots learn the Japanese language and assist their studies in general. In addition to schools or community centers being closed amid the outbreak, the poll also showed there was only limited online interaction with the children, either because there was no internet available at the students' homes or because the aging educational assistants lack the relevant technical knowledge. One survey respondent said it is "difficult to teach children online with the level of Japanese they have." Responses also highlighted the plight of the children amid the prolonged school closures.