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Google Dominates Thanks to an Unrivaled View of the Web

NYT > Technology

Understanding how Google's search works is a key to figuring out why so many companies find it nearly impossible to compete and, in fact, go out of their way to cater to its needs. Every search request provides Google with more data to make its search algorithm smarter. Google has performed so many more searches than any other search engine that it has established a huge advantage over rivals in understanding what consumers are looking for. That lead only continues to widen, since Google has a market share of about 90 percent. Google directs billions of users to locations across the internet, and websites, hungry for that traffic, create a different set of rules for the company.


tl;dr: this AI sums up research papers in a sentence

Nature

TLDR generates one-sentence summaries of computer-science papers on the scientific search engine Semantic Scholar.Credit: Agnese Abrusci/Nature The creators of a scientific search engine have unveiled software that automatically generates one-sentence summaries of research papers, which they say could help scientists to skim-read papers faster. The free tool, which creates what the team call TLDRs (the common Internet acronym for'Too long, didn't read'), was activated this week for search results at Semantic Scholar, a search engine created by the non-profit Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) in Seattle, Washington. For the moment, the software generates sentences only for the ten million computer-science papers covered by Semantic Scholar, but papers from other disciplines should be getting summaries in the next month or so, once the software has been fine-tuned, says Dan Weld, who manages the Semantic Scholar group at AI2 and led the work. Preliminary testing suggests that the tool helps readers to sort through search results faster than viewing titles and abstracts, especially on mobile phones, he says. "People seem to really like it."


Google search is getting new AI tools to decipher your terrible spelling

#artificialintelligence

Google detailed a host of new improvements at its "Search On" event that it will make to its foundational Google search service in the coming weeks and months. The changes are largely focused on using new AI and machine learning techniques to provide better search results for users. Chief among them: a new spell checking tool that Google promises will help identify even the most poorly spelled queries. According to Prabhakar Raghavan, Google's head of search, 15 percent of Google search queries each day are ones that Google has never seen before, meaning the company has to constantly work to improve its results. Part of that is because of poorly spelled queries.


Extreme Classification

Communications of the ACM

What would you do if you had the super-power to accurately answer, in a few milliseconds, a multiple-choice question with a billion choices? Would you design the next generation of Web search engines, which could predict which of the billions of documents might be relevant to a given query? Would you build the next generation of retail recommender systems that have things delivered to your doorstep just as you need them? Or would you try and predict the next word about to be uttered by U.S. President Donald Trump? The objective in extreme classification, a new research area in machine learning, is to develop algorithms with such capabilities.


China Appears To Block Microsoft's Bing Search Engine

NPR Technology

This is a visualization of global internet attacks, seen during the 4th China Internet Security Conference in Beijing. Microsoft's Bing search engine is no longer accessible in China, the company reports. This is a visualization of global internet attacks, seen during the 4th China Internet Security Conference in Beijing. Microsoft's Bing search engine is no longer accessible in China, the company reports. The Microsoft search engine, Bing, appears to have been blocked in China since Wednesday.


Google Testing A Censored Search Engine Just For China

NPR Technology

The Google.cn for China website is seen on a computer screen in this photo illustration. Google is reportedly working on a censored version of its search engine to comply with China's government's demands. The Google.cn for China website is seen on a computer screen in this photo illustration. Google is reportedly working on a censored version of its search engine to comply with China's government's demands. Google is testing a mobile version of its search engine that will adhere to the Chinese government's censorship demands, including the blocking of certain websites and search terms, according to multiple reports.


Russian Search Engine Alerts Google to Possible Data Problem

U.S. News

Yandex spokesman Ilya Grabovsky said Thursday that some Internet users contacted the company Wednesday to say that its public search engine was yielding what looked like personal Google files. Grabovsky said the company has alerted Google.


Amazon Is More Than A Shopping Site. It's A Search Engine Too

NPR Technology

NPR-Marist poll finds that almost half of online shoppers go to Amazon first when they look for an item. Other search engines know what customers look for but Amazon knows what they ultimately buy.


Microsoft Looks at Whether Russians Bought U.S. Ads on Search Engine

U.S. News

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp said on Monday it was looking into whether Russians bought U.S. election ads on its Bing search engine or on other Microsoft-owned products and platforms, after rival Google said it had discovered such ads on its products.


Microsoft Search Engine Bing to Focus on PC Search Market: CEO

U.S. News

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella said on Wednesday the company's search engine, Bing, will focus on expanding in the PC search market after losing its deal with Apple Inc's Siri.