Wall Street Journal


Alphabet Self-Driving Car Unit Creates Sensor Package

Wall Street Journal

DETROIT--Waymo LLC, the self-driving-car unit of Alphabet Inc., has created its own sensor package, suggesting the technology company sees itself supplying both the software and hardware required for autonomous vehicles. The announcement on Sunday at the start of the North American International Auto Show here gives the clearest window yet into how Waymo might put its self-driving-car project into auto makers' fleets. Bundling the hardware with the software required for self-driving technology would create an all-in-one...



Uber Ends Self-Driving Car Test in San Francisco

Wall Street Journal

Uber Technologies Inc. on Wednesday relented in a public battle with California regulators over self-driving cars, halting a test program in San Francisco after the state revoked the registration of the vehicles involved. Uber started the experiment a week earlier, making several of its self-driving vehicles available for customers to hail using a smartphone app. But it refused to apply for the $150 permit from the California...


Review: Can a Smart Oven Beat Mom's Home Cooking?

Wall Street Journal

We might not need an oven with a camera and Wi-Fi, but a smart oven that won't ruin the holiday roast?




Startup Gives Away Semiautonomous-Driving Software

Wall Street Journal

George Hotz, a 27-year-old coder who believes auto makers have been too slow to roll out self-driving vehicles, on Wednesday started giving away software to enable certain cars with semiautonomous driving features, a gambit to circumvent regulatory authority over self-driving cars. Mr. Hotz's company, Comma.ai, had initially planned to sell an aftermarket kit consisting of the software as well as hardware that would provide capabilities similar to those of Tesla Motors Inc.'s Autopilot system, for about $1,000 by year's...



With Driverless Cars, a Safety Dilemma Arises

Wall Street Journal

While commercial applications may be years away, any fully autonomous vehicle that eventually takes to the road will need to make decisions--like whether to swerve to miss one pedestrian at the risk of hitting another. In a classic version of the trolley problem, researchers ask a person to imagine being on a trolley racing toward a group of workers. The essential difference, some ethicists argue, involves taking an action that doesn't intend to kill someone versus actively causing the death of one. Karl Iagnemma, CEO and co-founder of nuTonomy, a Cambridge, Mass.-based company developing software for fully autonomous cars, says ethical questions like the ones raised in the Science paper are important to consider.


Three Books Every Geek Should Read This Summer

Wall Street Journal

Surprising factoid: The eggplant emoji is rendered more phallically on Apple products than others; often used to convey sexual attraction, it cannot be searched for as a hashtag on Instagram. Elevator pitch: Don't be fooled by the title. Surprising factoid: You can light an LED with nothing but wire, nails and lemons--but the chemical reactions will render the lemons unsafe to eat. It was a big search problem, finding a specific criminal in a city of criminals.