Wall Street Journal


A Chess Novice Challenged Magnus Carlsen. He Had One Month to Train.

Wall Street Journal

Max was not very good at chess himself. He's a 24-year-old entrepreneur who lives in San Francisco and plays the sport occasionally to amuse himself. He was a prototypical amateur. Now he was preparing himself for a match against chess royalty. And he believed he could win.


The Outlook for Technology M&A

Wall Street Journal

MS. KIM: What is the outlook for big acquisitions? NASON: I am bullish about 2018 for activity. Money is still virtually free. The equity market has been very responsive to M&A. Prices are still high, so we're seeing very high valuations.


Who Wants to Supply China's Surveillance State? The West

Wall Street Journal

The surveillance-equipment market in China was valued at $6.4 billion last year, according to IHS Markit . China is a big buyer of surveillance technology as Beijing steps up its efforts to better monitor its 1.4 billion people. That is providing a boon for equipment makers, who are looking to export their gear abroad. But it has also sparked concern from rights activists about how the authoritarian government is using the souped-up "Big Brother" technology. Seagate Technology PLC, Qualcomm Inc. and United Technologies Corp. were among the foreign companies to show their wares at the 16th China Public Security Expo, where prospective customers included Chinese police, government officials and businesses.


The Man Playing Peacemaker Between Trump and Tech

Wall Street Journal

"We are really working on issues that policy makers have never tackled before," Mr. Kratsios, the U.S. deputy chief technology officer, told The Wall Street Journal in his first major interview since his appointment in March. "It's just a question of putting smart people around a table and trying to come up with an innovative approach to regulating" new technologies, he said. To do that, he will need to work closely with the science and tech communities--some of the staunchest critics of Mr. Trump's policies. Leading scientists and tech executives have abandoned White House advisory councils and complained that the president's policies in areas like climate change and immigration threaten to reverse years of economic and social progress. It may help that Mr. Kratsios, 31 years old, hails from the world of technology, having spent seven years as an executive at venture-capital firms founded by Silicon Valley luminary Peter Thiel.


Elon Musk Plugs Tesla's New Truck Even as Model 3 Faces Delays

Wall Street Journal

Tesla shares the next day soared 4%--the kind of pop that continues to fuel Tesla's stock run this year as expectations build for Mr. Musk to fulfill his vision of a world complete with electric self-driving vehicles. Similarly, Mr. Musk was touting plans for the Model 3 while Tesla struggled to ramp-up manufacturing of the Model X in 2015, and last year he hosted a flashy event laying out his vision for making solar-panel roofs sexy. "It's exceptionally clear that over time, product announcements have helped to bolster the stock and cover up shortfalls in deliveries or manufacturing issues," said Mike Ramsey, an industry analyst for Gartner Inc. The showman's latest flourish comes as Tesla runs low on cash and struggles to mass-produce the Model 3, a $35,000 sedan that is the cornerstone of Mr. Musk's plan to transform Tesla from being a niche luxury player to a mainstream auto maker. Tesla has fallen behind its production goals for the Model 3 during the early manufacturing period that Mr. Musk has termed "production hell."


How to Survive a Robot Apocalypse: Just Close the Door

Wall Street Journal

In the meantime, if one of them goes berserk, here's a useful tactic: Shut the door behind you. One after another, robots in a government-sponsored contest were stumped by an unlocked door that blocked their path at an outdoor obstacle course. One bipedal machine managed to wrap a claw around the door handle and open it but was flummoxed by a breeze that kept blowing the door shut before it could pass through. Robots excel at many tasks, as long as they don't involve too much hand-eye coordination or common sense. Like some gifted children, they can perform impressive feats of mental arithmetic but are profoundly klutzy on the playground.


Baidu Sees AI as Key to Its Future

Wall Street Journal

MR. DEAN: You're placing a huge bet on artificial intelligence. Why do you think that could help you regain your edge? LI: First, every company has its own DNA. Baidu is a technology company. During the desktop age, in order to serve the users better, you just needed to come out with the best technology to rank contents on the internet.


Sony's Rebooted Robot Dog Will Fetch Ruffly $1,700

Wall Street Journal

Sony shares rose more than 11% on Wednesday to a nine-year-high. The new Aibo features improved artificial intelligence software and enhanced motors and sensors that help the robot better resemble a real dog. The company said each device will develop unique behavior patterns depending on owner interactions and can work with other internet-connected electronics. The Aibo will be released first in Japan and cost ¥198,000 (about $1,700). New owners will also need to pay about $25 a month for cloud services to provide their devices with remote updates for things like teaching the robot new tricks.


The Thinking Behind Alibaba's Expansion

Wall Street Journal

You started off in e-commerce. You're now directly or indirectly in cloud computing, media and entertainment, logistics, payments and others as well. Your vision is that customers will meet, work and live at Alibaba, which is pretty much everything. Where does the ambition end, and what's the unifying vision? TSAI: Since 1999, we started the company with a mission to make it easy to do business anywhere.


Waymo Showcases Driverless Vans Without Humans Behind the Wheel

Wall Street Journal

The experience begins in the back seat of the Chrysler Pacifica, where screens welcome customers aboard and instruct them to push a blue "start ride" button on the ceiling. The van otherwise seems like any other, except for its empty front seats. The demonstration, to a group of reporters at Waymo's closely guarded test facility more than 100 miles east of San Francisco, suggests the Silicon Valley company is closer to deploying vehicles on public roadways without human safety drivers on board. "Our intention, make no mistake, is to go fully driverless and let the public access this technology on public roads," said John Krafcik, Waymo's chief executive. "We're getting to the point now where, I think it's fair to say, we're really close."