The Independent


Detroit: Become Human review – Being a person has never been so personal

The Independent

In Detroit: Become Human, the ultimate challenge is deciding what it means to be alive. The kinds of questions that this game forces you to ponder – what it means to be alive as a human, what it means to not be, and whether it's possible to switch between – are the kinds of questions that the greats of both both science fiction and science fact have been asking themselves for decades. But Detroit: Become Human makes them immediately real, lifting them out of the abstract and forcing you to confront what it actually means to be a person, in perhaps the most personal way ever. Starting the game, you're dropped into 2038, which is largely like our current world except is filled with androids that help out around the home. And you're dropped into the heads of three of those androids, all of whom are at different stages of figuring out their role in this new and computer-populated world: one who is tasked with hunting down other rogue androids, and two who are stuck in domestic servitude, each teetering on the brink of their own breakthrough.


Listening to audiobooks is more engaging than watching films – even if you don't realise it, study finds

The Independent

Audiobooks are more emotionally engaging than TV and film – even if you don't realise it, according to a landmark new study. The new research from UCL suggests that having a book read to you causes physiological changes including an increased heart rate and heat spreading through your body. During the experiment, scientists had 103 participants of various ages listen to a range of different books, and compared their responses to how they felt when they watched the same scene in a film or TV adaptation. The study included emotional scenes from Game of Thrones and the Girl on the Train, for instance, both from the original book and their hugely popular adaptations. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


Gtech e-bike review: Like a normal bike, except you feel like you're incredibly good at cycling

The Independent

Technically, an e-bike is a normal bicycle that also includes a battery that gives you a push, but in reality it's nothing like that. In reality it's like a wizard: able to summon winds behind your back to propel you, like making yourself roughly twice as strong and fit as you really are, or like getting a backie from a friendly ghost. You pedal as normal, but when you do it triggers a computer that starts the motor whirring at the same time, propelling you along; when you reach 15mph, the law requires that it stops helping you, but it will kick back in when you slow down. Gtech's e-bike manages this magical act even better than most, by virtue of looking like a real bike. Some of its rivals embrace the fact that they are something towards a moped, with visible batteries and plenty of wires and weight; the Gtech model has all that, of course, but packs it onto a frame that looks like a normal push bike.


Amazon workers 'refuse' to build tech for US immigration, warning Jeff Bezos of IBM's Nazi legacy

The Independent

Amazon workers have written to CEO Jeff Bezos in protest of the company selling facial recognition tools and other technology to police departments and government agencies. The workers cite the use of Amazon technology by the US Department of Homeland Security and the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency, which have been criticised for enforcing President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" policy that has seen parents separated from their children at the US border. "As ethically concerned Amazonians, we demand a choice in what we build, and a say in how it is used. We learn from history, and we understand how IBM's systems were employed in the 1940s to help Hitler," the letter states. "IBM did not take responsibility then, and by the time their role was understood, it was too late.


Fortnite for Android: Fake versions of game spread across internet ahead of release date

The Independent

Malicious, fake versions of Fortnite for Android are spreading through the internet, despite the game not actually being released. The game has now been launched on just about every platform, having come to the Switch this month. But Android phones are still lacking – they won't be getting the game until later this year. That has meant that a rush of apps have been put onto the internet to try and make the most of that demand. Many of them are being advertised on YouTube, to try and trick people who are searching to find out how they can get hold of the game.


EU committee approves new rules that could 'destroy the internet as we know it'

The Independent

An EU committee has approved two new copyright rules that campaigners warn could destroy the internet as we know it. The two controversial new rules – known as Article 11 and Article 13 – introduce wide-ranging new changes to the way the web works. Article 13 has been criticised by campaigners who claim that it could force internet companies to "ban memes". It requires that all websites check posts against a database of copyrighted work, and remove those that are flagged. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


New EU law could completely change how the internet works and outlaw memes, campaigners claim

The Independent

The European Parliament is about to vote on a new law that campaigners claim could completely change "the free and open internet as we know it." If passed, Article 13 would mean that large internet platforms like Facebook and Reddit would need to introduce automated filters that captured copyrighted content uploaded by their users. It would potentially mean that tech companies would be forced to scan every single thing posted to their sites – and take down anything they think might be stolen. Campaigners warned that one of the biggest casualties of the proposed legislation would be online memes, which often use images that are subject to copyright. Prominent figures from the tech industry wrote an open letter to the President of the European Parliament warning that Article 13 represented an "imminent threat" to the future of the internet.


Space invaders turns 40: How to play the classic game, and why people love to so much

The Independent

Space Invaders, perhaps the most classic game ever made, is turning 40. The game was released in 1978, and in the years since has gone on to influence the entirety of culture. Its consequences were felt not only in games, but across various media, but across science fiction. It changed the way games worked. It was the first major game to depict its own world, rather than simulating something that already exists; it introduced central concepts, like the high score and multiple lives.


Google Translate: How does the search giant's multilingual interpreter actually work?

The Independent

Google Translate has become the internet's go-to resource for short, quick translations from foreign languages. The service was first launched in April 2006, seeing off early competition from the likes of Babel Fish. It now boasts more than 500m users daily worldwide, offering 103 languages. But how exactly does it work? How does Google News actually work?


Busy Britons are suffering from 'gadget confusion', study claims

The Independent

Busy Britons are suffering from "gadget confusion," a study has found. Research revealed millions are baffled by the number of buttons, symbols and switches on devices which are difficult to use. It also emerged a large percentage claim they don't have the time to read instructions and three quarters confessed to being confused by gadgets. Why the connected home's best place might be the garden New at-home beauty gadgets you need to try The latest smart gadgets keep homes cosy -- and safe -- all year round The best kitchen gadgets for creating healthy meals, fast Why the connected home's best place might be the garden Another eight in 10 admitted using a "trial and error" approach when it comes to their devices and appliances. And more than a third can't be bothered to try different settings or options.