TIME


'Detroit: Become Human' Forces You to Make Hard Choices -- As an Android

TIME

By 2038, robots have replaced people in most common jobs. Aside from a glowing circle that sits near their temple, they would be almost completely indistinguishable from the living, breathing people they were crafted to look like. It should come as no surprise, then, that it was only a matter of time until they begin doing things they haven't been programmed for -- slowly but surely gaining sentience and giving way to an uprising. Androids run the world, and humans are just living in it. That's what life is like in the city of Detroit 20 years in the future in Detroit: Become Human, a new game from studio Quantic Dream launching on May 25 for the PlayStation 4. Become Human, developed by the same studio responsible for cinematic adventure games Heavy Rain and Beyond Two Souls, centers on the lives of three androids: Kara, Markus, and Connor.


Amazon's Next Secret Project Could Be Robots That Follow You Around

TIME

Ten years ago, Amazon introduced the Kindle and established the appeal of reading on a digital device. Four years ago, Jeff Bezos and company rolled out the Echo, prompting millions of people to start talking to a computer. Inc. is working on another big bet: robots for the home. The retail and cloud computing giant has embarked on an ambitious, top-secret plan to build a domestic robot, according to people familiar with the plans. Codenamed "Vesta," after the Roman goddess of the hearth, home and family, the project is overseen by Gregg Zehr, who runs Amazon's Lab126 hardware research and development division based in Sunnyvale, California.


How This Former Circus Performer Is Turning Google Maps Into the Next Big Thing in Gaming

TIME

When 26-year-old Clementine Jacoby thinks back on her childhood, she remembers using printed maps to navigate strange new cities -- one of the many tools that smartphones have rendered largely obsolete. "My parents, I think, are just chronically bored," she says in a conference room at Google's New York offices. "We moved around a ton, and I was also sort of an agitated and ambitious kid and traveled a bunch on my own." It's perhaps fitting then that, after a year-long stint as a circus performer and graduating from Stanford University with a degree in symbolic systems (a program that focuses on a combination of cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and human-computer interaction), Jacoby ended up working as a product manager for Google Maps. It's a role that Jacoby feels like was made for her.


Facebook Is Telling People Their Data Was Misused by Cambridge Analytica and They're Furious

TIME

Facebook began alerting some users that their personal information was accessed during the Cambridge Analytica data breach, and suffice to say, Facebook users aren't happy. Some 87 million people are estimated to have possibly been affected by the Facebook Cambridge Analytica data breach, a higher number than the social media giant originally anticipated. Last week, Facebook announced that users who may have had their data misused by Cambridge Analytica would get a detailed message via their News Feed on Monday. Facebook has said most of the affected users are in the U.S., though there are over a million each in the Philippines, Indonesia and the U.K. Now users are taking to social media to reveal whether or not their personal information was obtained during the data breach, screen-shotting their Facebook notification. "Facebook sold me out to Cambridge Analytica too," one user wrote on Twitter.


A Global Arms Race for Killer Robots Is Transforming the Battlefield

TIME

Over the weekend, experts on military artificial intelligence from more than 80 world governments converged on the U.N. offices in Geneva for the start of a week's talks on autonomous weapons systems. Many of them fear that after gunpowder and nuclear weapons, we are now on the brink of a "third revolution in warfare," heralded by killer robots--the fully autonomous weapons that could decide who to target and kill without human input. With autonomous technology already in development in several countries, the talks mark a crucial point for governments and activists who believe the U.N. should play a key role in regulating the technology. The meeting comes at a critical juncture. In July, Kalashnikov, the main defense contractor of the Russian government, announced it was developing a weapon that uses neural networks to make "shoot-no shoot" decisions.


Mark Zuckerberg Says He's Still the Best Person to Run Facebook, Despite Its 'Huge Mistake' With the Cambridge Analytica Data Scandal

TIME

On the same day that Facebook announced that 87 million users may have had their personal data improperly accessed -- updated from the "tens of millions" figure the social network previously reported -- the company's founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg held a rare question-and-answer session with the media Wednesday, admitting that the company made a "huge mistake" by not taking more steps to protect user data and privacy early on. When asked if he thinks he is still the best person to run Facebook, Zuckerberg said, "Yes, I think life is about learning from the mistakes and figuring out what you need to do to move forward." Questions about Zuckerberg's leadership come after it's been revealed that Cambridge Analytica might have improperly obtained data from as many as 87 million people, mostly in the United States. The firm had ties to President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign. "At the end of the day, this is my responsibility," Zuckerberg said, when asked if anyone at Facebook had been fired over the Cambridge Analytica scandal.


Waymo and Jaguar Are Making Self-Driving Electric SUVs Together

TIME

Waymo is teaming up with Jaguar Land Rover on autonomous vehicles, its second major automaker partnership and a big boost for the nascent technology that has come under scrutiny recently. Under the accord, Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo will integrate its self-driving system into Jaguar's I-Pace electric SUVs, the first all-electric offering from the luxury unit of Tata Motors Ltd. Waymo said it plans to place 20,000 autonomous I-Pace vehicles on the road for tests in 2018. By 2020, the vehicles will become part of Waymo's ride-hailing taxi service, set to begin this year. "It ended up being a really terrific next vehicle for us and fit one of the key aspects of our business plan," John Krafcik, Waymo's chief executive officer, said in an interview. "We can get closer to getting just the right car for just the ride that person has requested."


Was Your Facebook Data Actually 'Breached'? Depends On Who You Ask

TIME

When Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg posted a status update Wednesday on the still-unfolding Cambridge Analytica scandal, he called it an "issue," a "mistake" and a "breach of trust." But he didn't say it was a data breach. Ever since the news broke this weekend that the U.K. firm Cambridge Analytica obtained information about 50 million Facebook users without their knowledge, the social media site has been carefully avoiding using those words. Executives are profusely apologizing but stopping short of characterizing the situation as a data breach -- a phrase that brings to mind images of hacker frantically typing in a dark room or stolen credit card numbers being shared online. Facebook has 1.4 billion daily users it doesn't want to scare off with the "data breach" characterization.


Arizona Woman Hit by Uber's Self-Driving Car May Be First Pedestrian Killed by an Autonomous Vehicle

TIME

The death of an Arizona woman who was struck by one of Uber's self-driving cars appears to be the first ever pedestrian fatality involving an autonomous vehicle. An Uber spokesperson confirmed to TIME that the incident occurred Sunday night in the Phoenix suburb of Tempe and that no passengers were in the backseat. Uber said there was one vehicle operator in the front seat at the time of the collision. The company says it's suspending its self-driving operations in Phoenix, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Toronto as a result. In a statement, the Tempe Police Department confirmed the vehicle involved was one of Uber's driverless cars and that it was in autonomous mode at the time of the accident.


The 3 Biggest Things Apple May Be About to Announce

TIME

Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference, or WWDC, will begin on June 4, the company recently announced. WWDC is one of Apple's biggest events of the year, giving it a chance to preview what's in store for gadgets from the iPhone to the Mac and beyond. The headlining news is usually a look at the next version of Apple's iPhone and iPad software, called iOS. Apple typically uses WWDC to show off the new features coming to the iPhone and iPad in the following months. But Apple may take a different approach this year, focusing less on flashy new features and more on performance upgrades.