PCWorld




BrandPost: What's powering your workforce transformation?

PCWorld

The way we work is being transformed by people, process and technology. Business is no longer about sitting in the office, tied to the desktop PC and the phone, but about working where you need to, when you need to, and using the right device for the job. Cloud and mobile technologies are empowerin...


Yeti: How a Google game console could take on Xbox, PlayStation, and Steam

PCWorld

It's called "Yeti," and it's the code name attached to an intriguing rumor about Google's gaming ambitions that emerged this week. The rumor suggests the company is developing its own cloud-based gaming service and home console. As The Information reported, the so-called service would stream games i...


How tighter ties between Google and Nest can bring new value to the Google Tax

PCWorld

Google announced yesterday that Nest will no longer be a standalone division of parent company Alphabet. Instead, the team that makes luxury smart home gadgets will live under the Google umbrella in an effort to tighten the integration between the gadgets in our homes and the Google Assistant that l...


HomePod review roundup: 'Room filling,' 'best-in-class' sound, but Siri is 'embarrassingly inadequate'

PCWorld

With less than 72 hours until its release, the first HomePod reviews are in from a hand-picked group of media outlets, and they're very positive--as long as you're buying Apple's $349 smart speaker for sound quality. The Homepod's "smarts," though, leave much to be desired. That's not a total surpr...


Best smart speakers: Which delivers the best combination of digital assistant and audio performance?

PCWorld

Google currently doesn't have a horse in this race. Several third-party manufacturers announced Google Assistant-powered smart displays at CES, but none are available right now. That leaves the Amazon Echo Show as the default winner. The Echo Show's best feature is its ability to make video calls to people on your contact list (it can also function as a video intercom within your home). But having a digital assistant that can also show you things has plenty of other useful applications, too: displaying album art (and lyrics, with Amazon's service) when you play music; shopping and to-do lists that you edit on the screen; illustrations that accompany your weather forecast; slideshows from your personal photo library; still photos from Wikipedia entries; and a whole lot more.


Microsoft offers three unconvincing reasons why its consumer business isn't dead yet

PCWorld

While Microsoft continues to be buoyed by enterprise and cloud services like Azure, chief executive Satya Nadella tried to reassure analysts that Microsoft still has a consumer strategy: Xbox, PC gaming, and devices powered by digital assistants like Cortana. But he wasn't especially convincing. With the demise of consumer products like the Zune music player, Groove Music Pass, and Windows phones, some customers have wondered whether Microsoft indeed has a consumer strategy in mind. "When I come home at night, I'm talking to Alexa... not Cortana," one analyst said during a Microsoft investor call on Thursday. "Our real strategy going forward is not only to do great work on the console but also complement that with the work we're doing on the PC," Nadella replied.


How to send Android SMS messages with Amazon Echo, and why it's a big deal

PCWorld

If you got a Google Home Mini to go with your Android phone this Christmas, one of the first things you probably asked it to do was send a text. But instead of asking what you wanted to say, your Google Home said this: Sorry, I can't send texts yet. But starting today, if you ask the same question to your Amazon Echo, it will happily oblige. Here's how to send SMS text messages with Amazon Echo. Echo devices have long been able to send messages to each other, but now Amazon has expanded that to the Android community as a whole, adding hundreds of millions of new devices to its ranks.


Google's cleaning up the Play Store, using machine learning to remove 700,000 bad apps

PCWorld

Earlier this month, Google removed some 60 games from the Play Store after it was uncovered that the so-called Adult Swine bug was delivering inappropriate and malicious ads to kids. According to Google, that's just a drop in the bucket compared to the 700,000 it booted from the Play Store in 2017. In a blog post titled, "How we fought bad apps and malicious developers in 2017," Google spotlights the numerous ways it has stayed ahead of bad Play Store Apps over the past 12 months. In addition to the 700,000 apps it took down in 2017--a 70-percent increase over 2016's numbers--Google also says it was able to identify and root them out much quicker: The company boasts that 99 percent of apps "with abusive contents" were tossed from the Play Store before anyone could install them. Google also says it has developed new detection techniques to weed out repeat offenders and identify "abusive developer networks at scale" to stop them from simply submitting another set of bad apps.