National Geographic News


Get an Amazing Whale's-Eye View Underneath Antarctica

National Geographic News

To see the world through the eyes of a 40-ton polar whale it helps to use a little bug. At least that's what this satellite tracking tag resembles.


How Creativity Drives Human Evolution

National Geographic News

To grow the kind of baby that we do, with this giant brain, who can't do anything for the first 3-5 years of life, you need a lot of input. As much as 1.5-1.7 million years ago, we start to see a shift in the fossils, which suggests that more than one or two individuals became closely involved in taking care of the young. Fast forward to the last couple hundred thousand years, and it is absolutely clear that the human success story is part and parcel of our incredible ability to "take a whole village" to raise a child, as the old saying goes. The nuclear family--Mom, Dad, a couple kids, and a dog--is not only very recent but is not even typical of the way most people live in the world.


The Adorable Maps Today's Cartographers Made as Kids

National Geographic News

So many of the cartographers I've gotten to know while writing about maps seem to genuinely love their jobs. It's one of those professions with a disproportionate number of people who are really happy to be there. I suspect that one reason for this could be that many of them have loved maps since they were kids, and they've managed to turn that love into a career.


Turning Images of Earth into Abstract Art

National Geographic News

The image above is what happens when you take a satellite photo of Earth and use an artificial-intelligence program to give it a makeover in the style of an early 20th-century painter.


Fly Through a Huge Volcanic Cave With These Stunning 3-D Scans

National Geographic News

W. Brent Garry sets up his laser scanner to complete the first 3-D map of Indian Tunnel, a lava tube in Craters of the Moon National Monument in Idaho.


Face of 9,500-Year-Old Man Revealed for First Time

National Geographic News

The 9,500-year-old Jericho Skull contains a human cranium packed with soil and covered with plaster to replicate individual facial features. Sea shells are used to represent the deceased's eyes.





'Squishy Finger' Soft Robot Hands Allow Sampling of Delicate Corals

National Geographic News

Their squishy robotic hands can gather coral samples more delicately than robots, and in places humans can't reach. Developed with support from a National Geographic Innovation Challenge Grant, the hands were first tested in tanks in March 2015 and then taken to the Red Sea in May. After a successful expedition, Wood and Gruber hope the technology may have even broader applications.