Transportation


Ford self-driving cars shift from pizza delivery to Walmart order pickup

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Ford teamed up with Domino's last year to test out self-driving cars for pizza delivery. And while a hot cheesy pie is certainly delicious, the autonomous technology is now being put to even better use. On Wednesday, Ford announced that it is now using Postmates delivery service to bring Walmart products to customers' homes via self-driving Ford vehicles. Ford works with Argo AI to power the self-driving part of the car. SEE ALSO: Ford and Domino's team up for self-driving pizza deliveries Starting in the Miami area, where Domino's is still testing autonomous pizza delivery and Ford has developed a urban self-driving car proving ground, the service will kick off with Walmart employees putting groceries into the car.


It's not just Waymo: Mercedes says it's launching a self-driving car service

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Self-driving car companies have been testing their vehicles for years, but now regular riders are starting to catch rides in the robot cars. Instead of merely watching a vehicle loaded with cameras, sensors, and other equipment drive by, some lucky folks (and not just company employees) are now able to experience the autonomy in person. Waymo is sticking to its end-of-2018 timeline for a self-driving taxi service in Arizona. GM's Cruise says 2019 is the year for a car service to drive San Franciscans around. And, in Dubai, a self-driving taxi service has already hit the streets.


Waymo blames human error for motorcycle accident involving self-driving car

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Waymo is pointing the robotic finger at humans. On Oct. 19 in Mountain View, a Waymo self-driving test car hit a motorcylclist, who ended up in the hospital. Now, Waymo has published a blog post with more information about the accident. And it turns out it all came down to that intractable problem: human error. SEE ALSO: Don't believe the naysayers: Self-driving cars are already here in many ways According to Waymo, the test driver of the self-driving car took control of the vehicle moments before the accident.


Elon Musk knows some of his tweets are too much and that 'Tesla cannot die'

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Tesla, SpaceX, and the Boring Company CEO Elon Musk made an appearance on Recode's podcast and he talked to the publication's Kara Swisher about tweeting, building a car company, a cyberpunk Tesla pickup truck, electric scooters, and the race to self-driving cars. In an hour-plus conversation the tech journalist hit on a lot of hot topics and Musk didn't evade or skip around most answers. He admitted that his tweeting habit -- while not as time-consuming as some might assume, at about 15 minutes a day -- led to to some regrettable moments. "It's fair to say I would probably not have tweeted some of the things I tweeted, that was probably unwise. And probably not gotten into some of the online fights that I got into. I probably shouldn't have attacked journalists, probably shouldn't have done that," he said.


Volkswagen and Intel team up for Israel's first self-driving car service

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Waymo is planning to have a self-driving taxi service on the road by the end of the year in Arizona. GM's Cruise has its sights on an autonomous taxi hitting San Francisco streets in 2019. In Dubai, a self-driving taxi service is already in testing. Now, Intel's Mobileye autonomous vehicle tech division plans to roll out a similar autonomous car service in Israel early next year. Announced Monday, Intel is building out an electric vehicle fleet with Champion Motors and the Volkswagen Group that will use Mobileye's self-driving software to autonomously shuttle passengers around Israel.


Tesla cars inch closer to their self-driving future with a big update to Autopilot

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The best thing about Tesla cars isn't just that they're zero-emission vehicles that are better for our planet's health; it's also that they're kinda like smartphones. With a software update, they get new features that make them even better than they were at purchase. Elon Musk took to Twitter on Friday night to announce "Navigate on Autopilot" would see "wide release in North America tonight." Available in "Software Version 9.0," the update brings the ability for Teslas to automatically steer from on-ramp and off-ramp, change lanes, take exits, and navigate highway interchanges. A Tesla spokesperson confirmed to Mashable "Navigate on Autopilot" has started rolling out to customers, but it could take up to several weeks before all Tesla cars get it (as is standard for Tesla software updates).


Lyft makes major move in race to put self-driving cars on the streets

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Uber may have stalled out with self-driving cars, but Lyft is just picking up speed. The ride-hailing app's fairly new self-driving division, Level 5, made its first acquisition, the company announced Tuesday. The London-based augmented reality company Blue Vision Labs will become part of Lyft and help develop AR, mapping, and camera tech for Level 5's self-driving cars. In a blog post, Level 5's Luc Vincent touted Blue Vision Labs' 3D maps, which are crowdsourced from car-mounted camera phones. He also floated an exciting way Lyft could use the startup's AR technology.


Ford's self-driving cars are first to hit D.C. roads

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Washington, D.C., is tracking more than politics. As of Monday, the nation's capital has its first self-driving cars on city streets. Ford is expanding its autonomous vehicle testing from Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Miami to the D.C. area. But that self-driving Domino's pizza delivery service is still only in Miami -- for now. SEE ALSO: Remember the driver disguised as a car seat?


Dubai launches its self-driving taxi service

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Through our stand at GITEX 2018, we have exhibited the first'Autonomous taxi' in the region. The technology underscores our commitment to enhance the Dubai Government's Strategy to convert 25% of total journeys in Dubai into autonomous transit by 2030. The vehicle has been designed in conjunction with the Dubai Silicon Oasis and DG World (Digirobotics). The vehicle offers an innovative solution for challenges associated with the first and last mile. It can remotely scan and figure out the surroundings, such as light signals and the four sides of the track through a GPS system.


I drove my first all-electric car. It reminded me of my distracting smartphone.

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I was driving a Jaguar -- my first time in the driver's seat of any vehicle from the luxury British car maker -- and there wasn't much to hear save for the slight swish of the car moving along the road and the wheels turning against the pavement. But there was so much going on. I was in the I-Pace, Jaguar's first all-electric car that Waymo plans to use for its self-driving taxi service. It's not the world's first electric car, but it was the first I had taken for a spin. SEE ALSO: Jaguar's classic E-Type is back as an all-electric sports car A quick jaunt around the event center made me realize several things: my next car should definitely be electric and this weirdly felt like the car version of my smartphone.