Goto

Collaborating Authors

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research


Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

JAIR is published by AI Access Foundation, a nonprofit public charity whose purpose is to facilitate the dissemination of scientific results in artificial intelligence. JAIR, established in 1993, was one of the first open-access scientific journals on the Web, and has been a leading publication venue since its inception. We invite you to check out our other initiatives.


AI and COVID-19

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

The recent outbreak of the novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) originated in Wuhan, China and within several months spread globally, resulting in millions of confirmed cases and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide. The human race is facing one of the most meaningful public health emergencies in the modern era caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. This pandemic introduced various challenges, from lock-downs with significant economic costs to fundamentally altering the way of life for many people around the world. The battle to understand and control the virus is still at its early stages. The uncertainty of why some patients are infected and experience severe symptoms, others are infected but asymptomatic, and others are not infected at all makes managing this pandemic very challenging.


News

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

JAIR invites submissions to a new special track on Artificial Intelligence and COVID-19 . This special track focuses on solutions that data science and AI provide to address challenges related to the global pandemic, and on relevant deployments and experiences in gearing AI to cope with COVID-19. Topics of interest in the context of COVID-19 include, but are not limited to: Machine Learning, Planning, Clustering, Knowledge Representation, Natural Language Processing, Image Processing, Temporal Data Analysis, Information Retrieval, Bioinformatics, Economic Utilities, and Risk Analysis. The deadline for submission is November 26th 2020. JAIR is happy to be a participant in the IJCAI Journal Track. Papers that have been accepted at JAIR but have not appeared before at a conference are eligible for acceptance for this track, including a presentation at IJCAI 2020.


FAQ

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

JAIR publishes full-length research articles, short technical notes, and survey and expository articles. See the editorial charter for more details. JAIR distributes articlees for free on the public internet. Individual users may read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of indvidual articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose as specified in our licensing terms. However, the right to publish complete volumes of the journal in print is reserved exclusively for AAAI, and therefore others may not sell or publish complete volumes of JAIR in print.


On Sparse Discretization for Graphical Games

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Graphical games are one of the earliest examples of the impact that the general field of graphical models have had in other areas, and in this particular case, in classical mathematical models in game theory. Graphical multi-hypermatrix games, a concept formally introduced in this research note, generalize graphical games while allowing the possibility of further space savings in model representation to that of standard graphical games. The main focus of this research note is discretization schemes for computing approximate Nash equilibria, with emphasis on graphical games, but also briefly touching on normal-form and polymatrix games. The main technical contribution is a theorem that establishes sufficient conditions for a discretization of the players’ space of mixed strategies to contain an approximate Nash equilibrium. The result is actually stronger because every exact Nash equilibrium has a nearby approximate Nash equilibrium on the grid induced by the discretization. The sufficient conditions are weaker than those of previous results. In particular, a uniform discretization of size linear in the inverse of the approximation error and in the natural game-representation parameters suffices. The theorem holds for a generalization of graphical games, introduced here. The result has already been useful in the design and analysis of tractable algorithms for graphical games with parametric payoff functions and certain game-graph structures. For standard graphical games, under natural conditions, the discretization is logarithmic in the game-representation size, a substantial improvement over the linear dependency previously required. Combining the improved discretization result with old results on constraint networks in AI simplifies the derivation and analysis of algorithms for computing approximate Nash equilibria in graphical games.


Constraint and Satisfiability Reasoning for Graph Coloring

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Graph coloring is an important problem in combinatorial optimization and a major component of numerous allocation and scheduling problems. In this paper we introduce a hybrid CP/SAT approach to graph coloring based on the addition-contraction recurrence of Zykov. Decisions correspond to either adding an edge between two non-adjacent vertices or contracting these two vertices, hence enforcing inequality or equality, respectively. This scheme yields a symmetry-free tree and makes learnt clauses stronger by not committing to a particular color. We introduce a new lower bound for this problem based on Mycielskian graphs; a method to produce a clausal explanation of this bound for use in a CDCL algorithm; a branching heuristic emulating Br´elaz’ heuristic on the Zykov tree; and dedicated pruning techniques relying on marginal costs with respect to the bound and on reasoning about transitivity when unit propagating learnt clauses. The combination of these techniques in both a branch-and-bound and in a bottom-up search outperforms other SAT-based approaches and Dsatur on standard benchmarks both for finding upper bounds and for proving lower bounds.


Contiguous Cake Cutting: Hardness Results and Approximation Algorithms

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

We study the fair allocation of a cake, which serves as a metaphor for a divisible resource, under the requirement that each agent should receive a contiguous piece of the cake. While it is known that no finite envy-free algorithm exists in this setting, we exhibit efficient algorithms that produce allocations with low envy among the agents. We then establish NP-hardness results for various decision problems on the existence of envy-free allocations, such as when we fix the ordering of the agents or constrain the positions of certain cuts. In addition, we consider a discretized setting where indivisible items lie on a line and show a number of hardness results extending and strengthening those from prior work. Finally, we investigate connections between approximate and exact envy-freeness, as well as between continuous and discrete cake cutting.


Annotator Rationales for Labeling Tasks in Crowdsourcing

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

When collecting item ratings from human judges, it can be difficult to measure and enforce data quality due to task subjectivity and lack of transparency into how judges make each rating decision. To address this, we investigate asking judges to provide a specific form of rationale supporting each rating decision. We evaluate this approach on an information retrieval task in which human judges rate the relevance of Web pages for different search topics. Cost-benefit analysis over 10,000 judgments collected on Amazon's Mechanical Turk suggests a win-win. Firstly, rationales yield a multitude of benefits: more reliable judgments, greater transparency for evaluating both human raters and their judgments, reduced need for expert gold, the opportunity for dual-supervision from ratings and rationales, and added value from the rationales themselves. Secondly, once experienced in the task, crowd workers provide rationales with almost no increase in task completion time. Consequently, we can realize the above benefits with minimal additional cost.


Planning High-Level Paths in Hostile, Dynamic, and Uncertain Environments

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

This paper introduces and studies a graph-based variant of the path planning problem arising in hostile environments. We consider a setting where an agent (e.g. a robot) must reach a given destination while avoiding being intercepted by probabilistic entities which exist in the graph with a given probability and move according to a probabilistic motion pattern known a priori. Given a goal vertex and a deadline to reach it, the agent must compute the path to the goal that maximizes its chances of survival. We study the computational complexity of the problem, and present two algorithms for computing high quality solutions in the general case: an exact algorithm based on Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming, working well in instances of moderate size, and a pseudo-polynomial time heuristic algorithm allowing to solve large scale problems in reasonable time. We also consider the two limit cases where the agent can survive with probability 0 or 1, and provide specialized algorithms to detect these kinds of situations more efficiently.


Incompatibilities Between Iterated and Relevance-Sensitive Belief Revision

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

The AGM paradigm for belief change, as originally introduced by Alchourron, Gärdenfors and Makinson, lacks any guidelines for the process of iterated revision. One of the most influential work addressing this problem is Darwiche and Pearl's approach (DP approach, for short), which, despite its well-documented shortcomings, remains to this date the most dominant. In this article, we make further observations on the DP approach. In particular, we prove that the DP postulates are, in a strong sense, inconsistent with Parikh's relevance-sensitive axiom (P), extending previous initial conflicts. Immediate consequences of this result are that an entire class of intuitive revision operators, which includes Dalal's operator, violates the DP postulates, as well as that the Independence postulate and Spohn's conditionalization are inconsistent with axiom (P). The whole study, essentially, indicates that two fundamental aspects of the revision process, namely, iteration and relevance, are in deep conflict, and opens the discussion for a potential reconciliation towards a comprehensive formal framework for knowledge dynamics.