Military


THAAD Site Under Threat By North Korea? South Korea Accuses Pyongyang Of Spying Using Drone In Seongju Region

International Business Times

The Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system, which is designed to intercept and destroy ballistic missiles, is being deployed in Seongju in order to protect South Korea from Pyongyang's growing threats. "It was confirmed that (the craft) took photos of the THAAD site in Seongju," a South Korean defense official told reporters, adding that the distance between the border and the zone in North Gyeongsang Province is around 168 miles. A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched during a successful intercept test, in this undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency. "The THAAD defensive missile system is critical to protecting South Koreans from Kim Jong Un's arsenal," U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce said in a statement last week.


Russian Military Army-2016 Expo: 10 Weapons Of War On Display At Annual Forum Near Moscow [PHOTOS]

International Business Times

Some of the items on display included bombs, air defense systems and unmanned vehicles for both the air and ground that Sputnik News called robots. The new tank debuted at Army-Expo 2016 and pulls out all the stops when it comes to war, including a 30mm automatic gun, a 7.62mm machine gun and guided antitank missiles, Sputnik reported. While most of the weaponry featured at Army-Expo 2016 was on the larger scale, an updated version of the golden standard of handheld machine guns in Russia was also on display, as the Kalashnikov assault rifle got a makeover of sorts. The Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft missile system combines "short-to-medium rage surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft artillery weapon system," Global Times reported.


China Exporting Military Drones Worth Millions Of Dollars

International Business Times

China exported military drones worth hundreds of millions of dollars to over 10 countries, state-run media said Thursday. Shi did not name the countries that bought the drones, the numbers of drones sold or the exact deal value, but said that the academy's most valuable sale was worth "hundreds of millions of U.S. The academy is also planning to get an export license for the new CH-5, which made its first test flight last August, and can launch air-to-surface missiles and laser-guided bombs, Shi said. SIPRI said Chinese weapons were mainly bought by other Asian countries, and named Pakistan as the biggest buyer.