Military


DJI: U.S. Army Won't Say Why It Banned Our Drones, Products

International Business Times

The memo cited a classified report, "DJI UAS Technology Threat and User Vulnerabilities," and a U.S. Navy memo, "Operational Risks with Regards to DJI Family of Products." The rule also applies to other items from the company, including flight computers, cameras, radios, batteries, speed controllers, GPS units, handheld control stations, and devices with DJI software applications installed. "We can confirm that guidance was issued," the U.S. Army told International Business Times on Tuesday, "however, we are currently reviewing the guidance and cannot comment further at this time." Others have expressed privacy concerns regarding data collection, as reports claimed DJI shared information with Chinese authorities, a claim the company has disputed.


U.S. Army Orders Units To Stop Using DJI Drones Over Concerns

International Business Times

The Army Aviation Engineering Directorate has issued over 300 separate Airworthiness Releases for DJI products in support of multiple organisations with a variety of mission sets. The Army ordered its units to halt the use of DJI products, including all of the company's unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The Department of the Army memo even reports that they have'issued over 300 separate Airworthiness Releases for DJI products in support of multiple organizations with a variety of mission sets.' Others have expressed privacy concerns regarding data collection, as reports claimed DJI shared information with Chinese authorities.


To Protect AI, Machine Learning Avances, US Wants To Chinese Investment Over Military Fears

International Business Times

Reuters reported Wednesday U.S. officials are concerned such cutting-edge technologies as artificial intelligence and machine learning could be used by the Chinese to augment their military capabilities and achieve greater advancements in strategic industries. Artificial intelligence and machine learning are seen as key components of the military drone program, which is an integral part of the fight against the Islamic State group. Reuters said it had reviewed a Pentagon report that warns China is avoiding U.S. oversight and gaining access to sensitive technology as the debate continues on strengthening the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which reviews foreign acquisitions of U.S. companies based on national security considerations. An aide to Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, told Reuters the lawmaker is working on legislation that would give the committee, which is composed by representatives from the departments of Treasury, Defense, Justice, Homeland Security, Commerce, State and Energy, more authority to block some technology investments.


Who Is Abu Khaled Al-Sanaani? Al Qaeda's Yemen Branch Commander, Other Members Killed In Suspected US Drone Strike

International Business Times

A suspected U.S. drone strike killed four members of al Qaeda's Yemen branch, including a local commander, two unidentified officials in Yemen said Saturday. On Thursday, a drone strike on a vehicle in al-Bayda province in central Yemen killed a senior AQAP leader known as Abdallah al-Sanaani. The U.S. has carried out drone strikes to target the Islamist militant group that has been exploiting Yemen's civil war, which has left at least 10,000 dead since fighting escalated in March 2015. The U.S. has targeted AQAP many times in recent years, and in 2011, Anwar al-Awlaki, an American-born cleric, who had reportedly become an al Qaeda leader in Yemen, was killed in an airstrike.


New York Bombing Suspect Unconscious, Intubated; Police Say They Have Yet To Question Him

International Business Times

New York bombing suspect Ahmad Rahami is reported intubated and unconscious Wednesday at University Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, where he was taken following a shootout with police. Investigators are looking for two men seen on surveillance video removing the unexploded pressure-cooker bomb from a piece of luggage. Investigators are looking for two men seen on surveillance video removing the unexploded pressure-cooker bomb from a piece of luggage. In a journal uncovered by police, Rahami reportedly praised al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and Anwar al-Awlaki, the U.S.-born Muslim cleric and al-Qaeda propagandist killed in a U.S. drone strike in 2011, as well as Nidal Hasan, the U.S. Army psychiatrist who killed 13 people at Fort Hood, Texas, in 2009.


Russian Military Army-2016 Expo: 10 Weapons Of War On Display At Annual Forum Near Moscow [PHOTOS]

International Business Times

Some of the items on display included bombs, air defense systems and unmanned vehicles for both the air and ground that Sputnik News called robots. The new tank debuted at Army-Expo 2016 and pulls out all the stops when it comes to war, including a 30mm automatic gun, a 7.62mm machine gun and guided antitank missiles, Sputnik reported. While most of the weaponry featured at Army-Expo 2016 was on the larger scale, an updated version of the golden standard of handheld machine guns in Russia was also on display, as the Kalashnikov assault rifle got a makeover of sorts. The Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft missile system combines "short-to-medium rage surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft artillery weapon system," Global Times reported.


Obama Administration Reveals US Drone Strikes Killed Up To 116 Civilians

International Business Times

United States President Barack Obama's administration said Friday that up to 116 civilians have been killed by U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan, Yemen and other countries where America is not at war. Obama's goal for the release of the numbers is reportedly to create greater transparency about the actions of the U.S. military and CIA in counterterrorism measures against militants plotting attacks against the United States. Even the most conservative estimates by non-governmental organizations that have spent years tallying U.S. strikes in these countries are higher than the ones acknowledged by the administration. Obama also signed an executive order Friday that requires U.S. policies to limit non-combatant casualties and publicizing the number of strikes each year, and combatants and civilians killed.


Afghanistan Sees Taliban Leader As Rigid Conservative Uninterested In Peace

International Business Times

The Afghan government is looking warily at the conservative religious scholar who has assumed leadership of the Taliban, seeing in him a rigid proponent of hardline orthodoxy who is unlikely to favor peace talks, officials said. "He is a very conservative, narrow-minded, inefficient kind of person who will never be able to unite the Taliban or gather support," said Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi, the deputy and spokesman of Mullah Mohammad Rasool, leader of the most prominent anti-Mansour faction in the Taliban. Pakistan, which has faced fresh accusations of harboring the Taliban after Mansour's death on its soil, said the drone strike had undermined the so-called quadrilateral peace process involving Pakistan, Afghanistan, the United States and China. But foreign policy chief Sartaj Aziz, who said the United States informed Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif of the strike against Mansour three-and-a-half hours before Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, said contacts would resume.


Afghan Taliban Appoint New Leader After Mansour's Death

International Business Times

The Afghan Taliban have named a deputy to former leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour as their new leader, a spokesman said in a statement on Wednesday, the group's first official confirmation that Mansour was killed in a U.S. drone strike. Sirajuddin Haqqani, head of a network blamed for many high-profile bombs attacks in Kabul in recent years, and Mullah Mohammad Yaqoob, son of former leader Mullah Mohammad Omar, will serve as deputies, Zabihullah Mujahid, the Taliban's main spokesman, said in the statement. The announcement, following a meeting of the Taliban's main shura or leadership council, ends three days of confusion during which the Islamist movement had provided no official reaction to the death of Mansour in a drone strike in Pakistan on Saturday. The Taliban have made big gains since NATO forces ended their main combat operations in Afghanistan in 2014 and now control more of the country than at any time since they were ousted by U.S.-led forces in 2001.


Afghan Taliban Meets To Discuss Succession, Leader Suspected Dead In US Drone Strike

International Business Times

A U.S. drone strike targeting the Afghan Taliban's commander, Mullah Akhtar Mansour, led to the leadership council meeting Sunday to discuss succession, two Taliban sources told Reuters. Pakistani local residents gather around a destroyed vehicle hit by a drone strike, in which Afghan Taliban Chief Mullah Akhtar Mansour was believed to be travelling, in the remote town of Ahmad Wal in Balochistan, around 100 miles west of Quetta, May 21, 2016. Confirming the attack, reportedly authorized by Obama, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry told a news conference Sunday, "Yesterday, the United States conducted a precision air strike that targeted Taliban leader Mullah Mansour in a remote area of the Afghanistan-Pakistan border." Afghan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah and defense ministry spokesman Daulat Waziri also gave similar statements.