Military


Watch: US Military's Microwave And Laser Weapons Take Out Drones Within Seconds

International Business Times

Despite being commercially available, drones can be a real threat. They can barge into no-fly zones, engage in mid-air crashes, reconnaissance missions, or even conduct deadly air-strikes. The risk of such attacks never wears off but in order protect its critical installations against rogue UAVs, United States military is working on some lethal counter-drone weapons. The service, in collaboration with defense manufacturer Raytheon, has produced two Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAV) -- one that uses high power microwave (HPM) to disable the target and other that deploys a high energy laser (HEL) to disintegrate it. The two systems were put to test in a recent Maneuver Fire Integrated Experiment and were able to take out as many as 45 different drones out of the sky, along with a few stationary mortal projectiles, Popular Mechanics reported.


Watch: China Tests Unmanned Battle Tanks, Could Soon Equip Them with AI

International Business Times

In a bid to modernize battlefield resources, the Chinese Army has started trialing unmanned tanks, according to a new report from state-run publication Global Times. The upgraded military vehicles are currently being tested with a distant manned console, much like remotely operated drones. However, the People's Liberation Army Ground Force, aka PLAGF, also plans to integrate them with artificial intelligence, in order to make them nearly self-operable. A short video from CCTV, a prominent state television broadcaster in the People's Republic of China, recently appeared on the internet showcasing one of the unmanned vehicles being tested. The clip features a modified version of a dated Type 59 tank moving forward and backward like a remote-controlled car and a distant Chinese Army official manning its control-box a few meters away.


Watch: Army's New Mine Detector Maps Hidden Underground Explosives In Real Time

International Business Times

The US Army is working on a new mine detector that allows soldiers to see as well as analyze the size of an explosive hidden underground. The new device uses real-time spatial location tracking and a range of sensors to produce an image of the buried object, be it an active IED or some unexploded artillery shell. As seen in the video, the tech creates a colored map on a tablet as and when the surface is scanned by the device. The area highlighted in orange roughly represents the scale or the metallic object or a potential risk-zone, while other colors represent the safer areas. "You can immediately see the shape of the object and roughly its size," Christopher Marshall, a scientist in the Countermine Division of the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, said in a statement.


Using Blockchain To Secure The 'Internet Of Things'

International Business Times

The world is full of connected devices – and more are coming. In 2017, there were an estimated 8.4 billion internet-enabled thermostats, cameras, streetlights and other electronics. By 2020 that number could exceed 20 billion, and by 2030 there could be 500 billion or more. Because they'll all be online all the time, each of those devices – whether a voice-recognition personal assistant or a pay-by-phone parking meter or a temperature sensor deep in an industrial robot – will be vulnerable to a cyberattack and could even be part of one. Today, many "smart" internet-connected devices are made by large companies with well-known brand names, like Google, Apple, Microsoft and Samsung, which have both the technological systems and the marketing incentive to fix any security problems quickly.


Israel Launches Attack In Syria After Shooting Down Iranian Drone

International Business Times

Tensions escalated when the Israeli military shot down an Iranian drone who they suspect infiltrated Israel early Saturday before launching an attack on dozens of Iranian targets in Syria, Reuters reported.


China's Nuclear Submarines To Get Artificial Intelligence Systems To Assist Commanders

International Business Times

China is working on the development of artificial intelligence (AI) systems that would enhance the thinking capabilities of commanding officers of nuclear submarines, a senior scientist, who was a part of the project, said.


Artificial Intelligence The Weapon Of The Next Cold War?

International Business Times

It is easy to confuse the current geopolitical situation with that of the 1980s. The United States and Russia each accuse the other of interfering in domestic affairs. Russia has annexed territory over U.S. objections, raising concerns about military conflict.


Department Of Defense Wants Bat-Like Drones Powered By Lasers

International Business Times

The United States Department of Defense announced it is offering grants to build bat-like drones that can be powered by lasers as part of its Defense Enterprise Science Initiative.


North Korean Missile Parts And Coal: Man Arrested As Black Market Agent

International Business Times

An Australian man was taken into custody Saturday for allegedly acting as an economic agent for North Korea and attempting to sell missile parts, military intelligence and coal on the black market.


Military Drone Deployed To Increase Monitoring Of California Wildfires

International Business Times

The state firefighting service of California collaborated with a unit of California Air National Guard and deployed military wartime drones in order to receive real time photos and videos of the massive wildfire which spread across the area.