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Video Of Niger Ambush Shows US Forces Fighting For Survival

International Business Times

A drone footage of the Niger ambush that killed four U.S. and five Nigerian soldiers that surfaced recently shows the service personnel desperately trying to escape and fighting for their lives after friendly Nigerien forces mistook them for the enemy. The video shows the harrowing hours of troops holding off their enemy and waiting for rescue. It shows how the soldiers set up a defensive location on the edge of a marsh and wrote letters to their loved ones thinking they were going to die. Pentagon released the video with explanatory narration and it contains more than 10 minutes of drone footage, animation and file tape that was not made public last week when the military released a portion of the final report on the October attack, the Guardian reported. In a failed attempt to target a local ISIS leader, 46 U.S. and Nigerien troops were involved in the initial mission in the West African nation.


Watch: Army's New Mine Detector Maps Hidden Underground Explosives In Real Time

International Business Times

The US Army is working on a new mine detector that allows soldiers to see as well as analyze the size of an explosive hidden underground. The new device uses real-time spatial location tracking and a range of sensors to produce an image of the buried object, be it an active IED or some unexploded artillery shell. As seen in the video, the tech creates a colored map on a tablet as and when the surface is scanned by the device. The area highlighted in orange roughly represents the scale or the metallic object or a potential risk-zone, while other colors represent the safer areas. "You can immediately see the shape of the object and roughly its size," Christopher Marshall, a scientist in the Countermine Division of the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, said in a statement.


How Robotics Is Helping Military Veterans With Prosthetics

International Business Times

In 1905, an Ohio farmer survived a railroad accident that cost him both of his legs. Two years later, he founded the Ohio Willow Wood company, using the namesake timber to hand-carve prosthetic limbs. The company grew, surviving the Great Depression and a fire that destroyed the plant, and still thrives today in rural Ohio. Few who work there now might remember the curious footnote in the company's history that occurred during World War II, when the rebuilt factory was diversified to build parts for PT boats and B-17 bombers. Today, it is ironic to consider a company that specializes in prosthetic limbs building parts for the war machine that unfortunately increases demand on companies making prosthetic limbs.


Russia's War Robots: Attack, Spy Machines In Development By Arms Contractor

International Business Times

Kalashnikov Concern, Russia's largest weapons manufacturer, has plans to develop a massive 20-ton attack and spy robot, intends to break into the increasingly popular drone market and even develop video games, the company's top executive told TASS News Agency in a far-ranging interview published Tuesday. CEO Aleksey Krivoruchko touched on his company's plans to hit almost every part of the arms and technology sectors but also said an entire family of robots were in development and the progress would be unveiled later this year. "We are pushing ahead with this work and hope to show some of our achievements at the Army-2017," Krivoruchko said, referring to a military technology convention when asked about potential new robot projects. "I'm talking not about one vehicle but a whole family of reconnaissance and attack vehicles of different class that can operate as a team." After creating the Soratnik, an unmanned combat ground vehicle revealed in September, Krivoruchko was also asked if something even bigger was in the mix.


Russia's New Weapons Of War: Robots To Take Over For Soldiers? Moscow Eyes Defense Sales With New Autonomous Fleet

International Business Times

Russia was preparing to display its military might to the world by showing off its latest weaponry: an updated version of its robot soldiers. The country's military was expected to fully participate in the upcoming ARMY-2017 International Military-Technical Forum this summer, according to Sputnik News. While details were scarce, Moscow debuted one of its fleet of military robots at least year's ARMY-2017. This year's forum will serve as a stage for Russia to showcase the latest developments it has made for its autonomous weapons of war. "The advanced development of the Russian Defense Ministry's Main Research and Testing Robotics Center will be demonstrated," Moscow's equivalent of the Pentagon said in a statement Monday.