International Business Times


Video Of Niger Ambush Shows US Forces Fighting For Survival

International Business Times

A drone footage of the Niger ambush that killed four U.S. and five Nigerian soldiers that surfaced recently shows the service personnel desperately trying to escape and fighting for their lives after friendly Nigerien forces mistook them for the enemy. The video shows the harrowing hours of troops holding off their enemy and waiting for rescue. It shows how the soldiers set up a defensive location on the edge of a marsh and wrote letters to their loved ones thinking they were going to die. Pentagon released the video with explanatory narration and it contains more than 10 minutes of drone footage, animation and file tape that was not made public last week when the military released a portion of the final report on the October attack, the Guardian reported. In a failed attempt to target a local ISIS leader, 46 U.S. and Nigerien troops were involved in the initial mission in the West African nation.


Watch: 3D-Printed Smart Gel Walks, Manipulates Objects Underwater

International Business Times

A group of engineers have created a weird type of smart gel that not only retains the soft nature and flexibility of a hydrogel, but also walks and manipulates objects placed underwater. Though most hydrogels host more than 70 percent water and are commonly found in the human body, diapers, contact lenses, and many other things, this particular creation, developed through sophisticated 3D-printing techniques, goes a step ahead and moves and changes its shape under the impact of electricity. Essentially, whenever the hydrogel is kept in a saltwater solution, such as an electrolyte, and electricity is applied, it reacts and starts walking forward, reversing course, grabbing and moving objects. The team behind this project, researchers from Rutgers University, United States, even shared a video showcasing how the unique gel works. In the video, the smart gel can be seen picking up and dropping as well as moving an object under the impact of an electric field.


Samsung Reveals Bixby 2.0 Will Launch Alongside Galaxy Note 9

International Business Times

Samsung's Bixby voice assistant is lagging behind the likes of Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa in terms of speed and voice recognition. However, that might finally change as the company has confirmed that Bixby 2.0 will launch later this year. Head of AI at Samsung Research Gary G. Lee told the Korean Herald that Bixby 2.0 will launch alongside the Galaxy Note 9, which is rumored to be released in August. Lee also confirmed that Bixby 2.0 will come with upgraded and enhanced natural language process, improved noise resistance and quicker response times. The current version of Bixby is able to answer most queries easily, but the problem is that users must be very specific in how they ask questions.


HTC U12 Full Specs Revealed Along With New Press Render

International Business Times

The HTC U12 is expected to be announced in just a few days and it looks like its full specs have already been revealed along with a new press render. The detailed specs sheet and the new press render for the HTC U12 were shared online by notorious leaker Evan Blass (@evleaks) on Twitter. The upcoming HTC flagship appears to carry over some of the design elements of last year's HTC U11, but with very minor changes. The U12 still comes with an all-glass body that's IP68 water and dust resistant. The phone features a 6-inch 2,880 x 1,440 18:9 aspect ratio LCD display with thinner bezels.


eBay App Gets New 'Interests' Feature To Deliver Personalized Experience

International Business Times

Called Interests, the new eBay app feature is able to curate products to users based on their personal wants and needs. The Interests feature on the eBay apps works by having users answer a few questions, like "What's your style?" and "What are your favorite activities?" Answering these questions will help the app figure out what kinds of products the user will actually want to buy. Additionally, Interests will also match products based on the user's browsing patterns to deliver personalized recommendations. The company said that it is able to curate products using machine learning and algorithms.


Xiaomi Mi 7 Leak Shows Apple Face ID-Inspired Module

International Business Times

The Xiaomi Mi 7 is rumored to be the first Android phone with 3D facial recognition that's similar to the Apple iPhone X. Now an alleged leaked render has popped up showing what Xiaomi's front-facing camera system looks like. The render for Xiaomi's 3D facial recognition module was spotted on the Chinese social media website Weibo. The render shows that the Mi 7 will have a notch on its display and it will house Xiaomi's 3D facial recognition module. At a glance, the render looks very similar to how Apple introduced the TrueDepth camera system that makes Face ID possible on the iPhone X. Starting from the left side, Xiaomi's camera system appears to have an infrared camera.


Ancient Humans Had Small Brains But With Modern Features

International Business Times

Ancient human relatives Homo naledis might have had pint-sized brains, but when it came to hosting complex features, their tiny packages had almost everything that we see in the brains of modern-day humans. The theory comes from a new study exploring the skull fragments of the ancient species. The fragments had brain impressions, something that hinted despite being small, the brains of our ancient relatives had structure and shape similar to our own, which is three times bigger in terms of size. The skulls of Homo naledi bear traces that suggest the shapes and structure of their brains were very similar to that of Homo sapiens. Only a third the size of human brains, they nonetheless had some surprisingly human-like features.


Tesla News: Elon Musk Looking To Reorganize Electric Car Company?

International Business Times

Tesla Inc's chief executive officer told employees on Monday the company is undergoing a "thorough reorganization," as it contends with production problems, senior staff departures and two crashes last week involving its electric, self-driving cars. CEO Elon Musk said in an email it was "flattening the management structure to improve communication," combining functions and trimming activities "not vital to the success of our mission" in the reorganization. The company confirmed the note that was disclosed earlier by the Wall Street Journal. Tesla is at a critical juncture as it tries to fix production headaches that have slowed the rollout of its Model 3 sedan, a mid-market car seen as key to the company's success, and as it expands on other fronts. Tesla shares fell 1.3 percent to $297 on Monday.


Your Spotify History Could Help Predict What's Going On With The Economy

International Business Times

The Bank of England's chief economist, Andy Haldane, has urged his colleagues to examine the musical mood of the nation when contemplating changes to the Bank's interest rate. How could an increase in Taylor Swift downloads or a decline in the popularity of rock and roll be relevant for managing the economy? It all comes down to measuring economic sentiment. This is a way of gauging how people feel about the economy, which behavioural economists use to make predictions about how it will respond to different policies. For example, if people are generally pessimistic about the economy then raising interest rates might encourage them to stop borrowing and spending by so much that it harms the economy.


Animals' Ability To Remember Past Events Could Prove Critical For Alzheimer's Treatment

International Business Times

The ability to remember a sequence of events as they happened seems like a quality restricted to humans. Previously, we had no clue if animals could do something similar, which is not the case anymore. A group of scientists discovered rats can also remember episodes of past memory. The find, a first in the field of neuroscience, is not exactly similar to human's ability to remember things but could be the key to develop better treatments for Alzheimer's disease. "The reason we're interested in animal memory isn't only to understand animals, but rather to develop new models of memory that match up with the types of memory impaired in human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease," lead author Jonathon Crystal said in a statement.