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Professor Who Sold Facebook Data To Cambridge Analytica 'Sincerely Sorry'

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Kogan told CBS' "60 Minutes" he was "sincerely sorry" for assuming that everyone knew their data was being mined, but didn't care. He was the one who designed the personality quiz that granted access to personal data ― location, gender, birthday and page likes for the person taking the quiz as well as their friends ― on tens of millions of Facebook users.


A Boston Dynamic Robot Has Figured Out Door Levers. Sleep Tight!

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"It will be so much more capable than us -- what will be our job? What will be our life? We have to ask philosophical questions. Is it good or bad?" he said at a conference in Barcelona. "I think this superintelligence is going to be our partner. If we misuse it, it's a risk. If we use it in good spirits it will be our partner for a better life. So the future can be better predicted, people will live healthier, and so on."


Worker Says Colleague Faked Out Her iPhone X's Facial Recognition ID

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Apple hasn't yet confirmed a case of an unrelated adult cracking the phone's facial recognition software, according to the Apple spokesman. The company insists that the probability of a random person accessing someone else's iPhone X using the Face ID passcode is 1 in 1 million, versus 1 in 50,000 for Touch ID. Phil Schiller, Apple's vice president of product marketing, conceded in September: "Of course, the statistics are lowered if that person shares a close genetic relationship with you."


Elon Musk's Tweet Gives Creepy Insight Into Future Of Humanoid Robots

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The Atlas robot is marketed as the "world's most dynamic humanoid," but even that impressive advancement might soon be eclipsed by artificial intelligence. The Tesla CEO followed up his creepy comment with a warning about the future of leaving such technology unchecked.


Will Self-Driving Cars Kill The Radio?

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With the imminent rise of self-driving cars' popularity, Nikhil Reddy discusses the possibility that traditional radio could be left in the dust.


We Should Make AI And Blockchain Boost Global Trade

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It wouldn't be unfair to assume the risk of deglobalization and the emergence of industry 4.0 as perhaps the two most important dynamics unfolding in the world today. And there are certainly many actions beyond the realm of trade that must be taken in order to make both globalization and the Fourth Industrial Revolution work. Retraining ― and therefore the "reskilling" of the labor force ― is definitely one of them. But by scanning the technological horizon out there, we feel there are innovations that may actually propel trade and globalization forward, in a way that is both inclusive and smart.


Is Artificial Intelligence A (Job) Killer?

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Artificial intelligence consists of large collections of connected computational units called artificial neurons, loosely analogous to the neurons in our brains. To train this network to "think," scientists provide it with many solved examples of a given problem.


Self-Driving Car Technology Foiled By Kangaroos

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The BBC points out that the problem would hardly be a trivial one for self-driving cars in Australia, since kangaroo collusions are a significant problem for regular cars. About 80% of vehicle collisions with animals in Australia involve kangaroos, adding up to more than 16,000 kangaroo-related collisions every year.


Are Robots Taking Over The World's Finance Jobs?

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The SEC's rules, created to protect the investors, require that advisers adhere to a fiduciary standard by which they unconditionally put the client's best interests ahead of their own. Concerned US regulators have asked whether it is practical for robots to follow rules when their decisions and recommendations are generated not by ratiocination but by algorithms.


The Data Defying The Job-Killing Robot Myth

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There was a similar story with at least the first half of the 1995 to 2005 productivity uptick. In the late 1990s, unemployment rates fell to levels that many economists did not think would be possible without triggering spiraling inflation. In addition, workers at the middle and the bottom of the wage ladder saw sustained real wage growth for the only time in the last four decades. This period of prosperity ended when the stock market crash brought on the 2001 recession, from which the labor market recovered slowly, but few economists would see the productivity boom of this decade as being a negative from the standpoint of workers.