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Intel befriends AMD, monitors get massive, and more – The big PC trends from CES

FOX News

File photo - A man takes a selfie in front of the CES logo during the 2018 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. Jan. 10, 2018. While great laptops and 2-in-1s come out every year, we don't see significant innovation taking place in computing on an annual basis. But this year at CES, we saw some upending of the standard quo on a number of levels. The trends we saw from the show floor have us both curious and excited about the future of computing. Some will undoubtedly end up in dead ends -- and others will probably become the new status quo in just a few years.


The most exciting military vehicles of 2017

FOX News

The aim is for a SMET robot to be able to carry 1,000 pounds across more than 60 miles in 72 hours. Whether you're interested in trucks, tanks, motorcycles, armored vehicles or ATVs, 2017 was a great year, with lots of incredible machines. And it was a year in which lots of out-of-the-box advances – some might even say shocking – were revealed. Where do we find these insider machines? I also meet with military and private sector innovators to closely evaluate the vehicles and put them through their paces.


Martti is a self-driving car from Finland designed for icy snow-covered roads

FOX News

Driving in winter conditions can be slow and hazardous, even for skilled drivers. The self-driving cars in development today are generally designed and tested on city streets, with curbs and lane markings and GPS maps to rely on. But what happens when you live in a country like Finland, where roads covered with several inches of snow are a fact of life every year? Researchers at the VTT Technical Research Centre are tackling that problem head-on with Martti, an autonomous vehicle specifically programmed to safely navigate public roads blanketed in snow. Built on a Volkswagen Touareg, it's equipped with a variety of antennas, sensors, cameras, and laser scanners.


Bill Gates firm buys Arizona land for $80 million to create 'smart city'

FOX News

A real estate investment firm owned by Bill Gates recently bought land in Arizona for $80 million to be developed into a "smart city." A real estate investment firm owned by Bill Gates recently bought a giant plot of land in Arizona for $80 million to be developed into a "smart city." Arizona-based Belmont Partners, one of Gates' investment firms, purchased close to 25,000 acres of land in Tonopah, around 50 miles west of Phoenix, to create a "smart city" called Belmont, KPNX reported. "Belmont will create a forward-thinking community with a communication and infrastructure spine that embraces cutting-edge technology, designed around high-speed digital networks, data centers, new manufacturing technologies and distribution models, autonomous vehicles and autonomous logistics hubs," Belmont Partners said in a press release, according to KPNX. The community "will transform a raw, blank slate into a purpose-built edge city built around a flexible infrastructure model," according to Belmont Properties.


Self-driving shuttle hit by human-driven truck hours after debut

FOX News

An automated driverless shuttle bus debuts in Las Vegas and on the same day a semi-truck backs up into it. An automated driverless shuttle was involved in an accident hours after it debuted in the streets of downtown Las Vegas on Wednesday. Those involved in the conception of the project have said the shuttle was not at fault. "The exciting thing is that the vehicle did exactly what it was programmed to do. This is a really good real-world case of how the technology actually works, said John Moreno, a spokesperson for The American Automobile Association (AAA,) who is a sponsor on the project.


This artificial intelligence may start tracking you soon

FOX News

For the last year, the people of Hangzhou, China – a city of more than nine million – have had every moment of their lives tracked. It's already 1984 in China. For the last year, the people of Hangzhou, China – a city of more than nine million – have had every moment of their lives tracked. "City Brain," an artificial intelligence system that interlinks with a city's infrastructure was installed in October 2016, through a partnership with Alibaba and Foxconn. In an effort to optimize Hangzhou and make urban life easier, the system tracked everything from robberies to traffic jams and learned the city's unique patterns and needs.


Nissan ProPilot Assist semi-autonomous driving system to launch in 2018 Rogue

FOX News

Nissan is launching its new semi-autonomous ProPilot Assist system in the Rogue crossover, its best-selling vehicle, before it arrives in the all-new electric Leaf next year. The system uses a camera and radar to allow a vehicle to steer itself in the middle of a lane on the highway, while maintaining a safe distance from the vehicle in front of it. Nissan expects around 30 percent of Rogues sold next year to be equipped with the feature. ProPilot Assist monitors the lane markers and vehicles ahead. Unlike some competing systems, ProPilot Assist isn't meant for anything resembling hands-off driving.


AUSA 2017: 4 amazing land vehicles at this year's show

FOX News

Fox Firepower: Defense Specialist Allison Barrie shares her top picks of high-tech military vehicles on display at AUSA 2017 including a fuel-cell powered Chevy truck and a self-driving Polaris MRZR. Armored vehicles with laser weapons, silent motorcycles that can run on jet fuel, self-driving ATVs and futuristic Chevy trucks - there were a lot of eye-popping vehicles in the nation's capital this week. Another JLTV featured the Boeing Maneuver Short Range Air Defense (SHORAD) Launcher including a M3P .50 JLTV General Purpose equipped with Rafael Samson RWS Dual Stabilized Remote Weapon Systems with M230 LF, and the Trophy Light Active Protection System. This new General Motors prototype, known as the Chevrolet Colorado ZH2, runs on hydrogen fuel cells.


Tesla's autonomous car claim is 'full of crap', says General Motors expert

FOX News

Tesla's entrepreneurial boss Elon Musk claims his cars "already have the hardware needed for a full self-driving capability", known in the industry as a "Level Five" engineering standard. However in a briefing about autonomous cars to Australian media in Detroit overnight, Scott Miller, General Motors' director of autonomous vehicle integration said "I think he's full of crap", when asked what he thought about Musk's claim. "To be what an SAE Level Five full autonomous system is, I don't think he (Elon Musk) has the content to do that." Mr Miller said lydar and radar systems do a good job of measuring object speed and cameras do a great job of identifying objects.


First real self driving car?

FOX News

General Motors-owned Cruise Automation has revealed what it claims is the first mass-producible car capable of driving itself. In a blog post, Cruise CEO Kyle Vogt said the Chevrolet Bolt-based vehicle is equipped with all of the sensors and redundant equipment to safely put it on the road without a driver when the software to operate it is fully-developed. No timeline for final validation of the software was revealed, and public sales are not yet planned. Tesla also claims its new Model 3 is equipped with the hardware needed for full self-driving capability, but has not said when its software will be ready to activate the function.