Security & Privacy


iPhone X: Privacy threat?

FOX News

During the event, Apple senior vice president of marketing Phil Schiller said that the facial recognition technology can adapt as your face changes. During Tuesday's launch event, Apple's Schiller said that just holding the iPhone X up will not work if it's not properly aligned with a person's face. Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, Phil Schiller, introduces the iPhone X during a launch event in Cupertino, California, U.S. September 12, 2017. According to The Verge, leaked source code shows the ability to opt out of Face ID, which Apple offered with Touch ID.


Smartphone cameras are getting

FOX News

Big changes are coming to your phone's smartphone camera next year, with Qualcomm previewing an update to its image signal processor (ISP) that will better support features like face recognition and mixed reality. While the next major Snapdragon update won't arrive until next year, the changes planned for the Spectra ISP have major implications not just for the cameras on 2018 Android phones but for virtual- and augmented reality headsets as well. Specifically, Qualcomm is promising that its new camera module will feature improved biometric sensing for detecting people's faces and support for depth sensing that can power mixed reality features for smartphones and headsets. The iris authentication module provides always-on security that can support phone unlocking features.


Can AI save us?

FOX News

Last week, the WannaCry ransomware attack crippled their network -- one report suggested people with life-threatening injuries were told not to come to the hospital. In the future, security systems could use artificial intelligence to monitor user behavior, track activity, suggest when there may be a danger and even mount an attack against the ransomware purveyors, effectively rendering the deadline malware client inoperable. Raja Mukerji, the cofounder and Chief Customer Officer at ExtraHop Networks, equates how an AI can block ransomware to how airport security stops people from using water bottles. A new technique using AI in airport security would not block all water bottles.


Can hackers 'clamp' cars?

FOX News

Cyber criminals would target software defects in radios, ECUs and on-board WiFi to immobilise cars and hold motorists to ransom at the roadside. The advent of driverless cars, vehicles connected to city infrastructure and cloud-based infotainment systems all offer criminals more ways than ever to take over motors. The car industry is taking a proactive approach to hacking threats with security experts Thatcham Research working with Government and other specialists to draw up a basic framework and safety standard for manufacturers to adhere to. "This will give drivers assurance that connected autonomous vehicles have been designed and tested to meet exacting cyber security standards."