Security & Privacy


iPhone X: Privacy threat?

FOX News

During the event, Apple senior vice president of marketing Phil Schiller said that the facial recognition technology can adapt as your face changes. During Tuesday's launch event, Apple's Schiller said that just holding the iPhone X up will not work if it's not properly aligned with a person's face. Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, Phil Schiller, introduces the iPhone X during a launch event in Cupertino, California, U.S. September 12, 2017. According to The Verge, leaked source code shows the ability to opt out of Face ID, which Apple offered with Touch ID.


Could sex robots kill you?

FOX News

With sex robots becoming increasingly popular and sophisticated, Cyber security lecturer Dr Nick Patterson revealed that the lifelike dolls could end up going all Terminator on us. Dr Patterson told Star Online that hacking into many modern-day robots, including sexbots, would be a piece of cake compared to more sophisticated gadgets like mobiles and computers. The tech expert, from Deakin University, Australia, said: "Hackers can hack into a robot or a robotic device and have full control of the connections, arms, legs and other attached tools like in some cases knives or welding devices. Previously, the Sun Online exclusively revealed that the sexbots could actually end up SAVING people's lives, according to one of the companies behind the AI-lovers.


Smartphone cameras are getting

FOX News

Big changes are coming to your phone's smartphone camera next year, with Qualcomm previewing an update to its image signal processor (ISP) that will better support features like face recognition and mixed reality. While the next major Snapdragon update won't arrive until next year, the changes planned for the Spectra ISP have major implications not just for the cameras on 2018 Android phones but for virtual- and augmented reality headsets as well. Specifically, Qualcomm is promising that its new camera module will feature improved biometric sensing for detecting people's faces and support for depth sensing that can power mixed reality features for smartphones and headsets. The iris authentication module provides always-on security that can support phone unlocking features.


Can AI save us?

FOX News

Last week, the WannaCry ransomware attack crippled their network -- one report suggested people with life-threatening injuries were told not to come to the hospital. In the future, security systems could use artificial intelligence to monitor user behavior, track activity, suggest when there may be a danger and even mount an attack against the ransomware purveyors, effectively rendering the deadline malware client inoperable. Raja Mukerji, the cofounder and Chief Customer Officer at ExtraHop Networks, equates how an AI can block ransomware to how airport security stops people from using water bottles. A new technique using AI in airport security would not block all water bottles.


Can hackers 'clamp' cars?

FOX News

Cyber criminals would target software defects in radios, ECUs and on-board WiFi to immobilise cars and hold motorists to ransom at the roadside. The advent of driverless cars, vehicles connected to city infrastructure and cloud-based infotainment systems all offer criminals more ways than ever to take over motors. The car industry is taking a proactive approach to hacking threats with security experts Thatcham Research working with Government and other specialists to draw up a basic framework and safety standard for manufacturers to adhere to. "This will give drivers assurance that connected autonomous vehicles have been designed and tested to meet exacting cyber security standards."


Hackers infected DC surveillance camera network days before Trump's inauguration

FOX News

A group of hackers managed to breach Washington D.C.'s surveillance camera network and infect the system with ransomware days before President Trump's inauguration, law enforcement officials close to the investigation told Fox News. The network of cameras affected eight days before President Trump was sworn in included ones located along the inaugural parade route, officials said Thursday. Investigators were able to rid the system of ransomware without paying any money, and the network was fully operational on Inauguration Day. An investigation into the ransomware attack is ongoing and being run by the Secret Service, officials said. A separate law enforcement source described the cyber-attack to Fox News as emanating from overseas, and that investigators have not ruled out the possibility that this attack was carried out by a state sponsored actor.


Will Evernote spy on you?

FOX News

Evernote is scrapping its proposed Privacy Policy updates following user backlash. The company recently introduced new rules authorizing employee access to users' saved scribblings. But the guidelines, set to go into effect on Jan. 23, were quickly discarded. Instead, Evernote will revise its existing policy "to address our customers' concerns, reinforce that their data remains private by default, and confirm the trust they have placed in Evernote is well founded," Greg Chiemingo, senior director of communications, wrote in a blog post. What this change boils down to is the planned opt-out for humans reading your notes becomes an opt-in.


Uber allegedly spied on users, including celebrities like Beyoncé

FOX News

Uber might be one of the best ways to hail a taxi in many cities around the world, but it's also a controversial service that has been plagued by scandals. The company has said it couldn't access ride data information for its users. A former Uber security expert, however, claims that employees have been able to track people using the app, including high-profile customers. Uber employees helped ex-boyfriends stalk ex-girlfriends, and were even able to access trip information for celebrities like Beyonce, Reveal News explains. These revelations come from the company's former in-house forensic investigator Ward Spangenberg.


Easy fixes to tech problems

FOX News

From the looks of it, 2017 will be a pretty amazing year for technology. Every day consumers are talking about virtual reality, self-driving cars and a limitless menu of on-demand services. The future really has arrived. But even as digital tech gets more streamlined and powerful, glitches keep popping up. Just when we think we have superhuman control of our lives, a device fails to work and we have no clue how to fix it.


Adult dating site reportedly hacked for second time

FOX News

AdultFriendFinder has reportedly been hacked for the second time in 18 months, though the latest incident appears to be way more serious. Uncovered over the weekend by data leak information site LeakedSource, the October 2016 breach is thought to affect 340 million users of AdultFriendFinder, an online service that describes itself as "one of the world's largest sex hookup, dating, chat, sexy matches and adult friends sites in the world." The nabbed data, which is thought to comprise information going back to 1996 when the site launched, reportedly includes usernames, account passwords, email addresses, and the date of a user's last visit. The fact that old data has also been compromised suggests the operators of AdultFriendFounder failed to wipe the details of former users from its database when they closed their accounts. California-based AdultFriendFinder was also targeted by hackers in May last year.