Security & Privacy


Stop robocalls, free TV, anonymous browsing and more: Tech Q&A

FOX News

Q: I am so tired of robocalls. Is there any way to stop them for good? A: The robocall is like the mosquito of telecommunications, bugging us to the point of madness. So why do companies (and criminals) still cling to such an obnoxious method? Enough people still relent or refuse to hang up, or even hand over their credit card numbers that the masterminds behind robocalls would be crazy to give up their racket.


Chinese group engaging in cyber espionage against US companies, report says

FOX News

A "wide-ranging" cyber-espionage campaign has been launched by a China-based group known as Thrip, according to a Threat Intelligence report released from cybersecurity giant Symantec. The attacks were first detected early this year but a Symantec spokesperson told Fox News that they have confirmed activity through May. Symantec identified three computers in China used to launch the attacks. "Thrip's motive is likely espionage and its targets include those in the communications, geospatial imaging, and defense sectors, both in the United States and Southeast Asia," according to the report. Symantec declined to identify the companies.


Why Europe's privacy clampdown may not solve Facebook's data scandal woes

FOX News

The latest Fox News Poll finds that nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of current users say they care if Facebook shares their information with others, and a large 43 percent minority have thought about deleting their account in order to protect their privacy. Think about your interaction with Facebook as a relationship. Now, imagine being at dinner with someone new and they say they are recording the conversation, taking your fingerprints, tracking your movements and they are going to share all of that data with everyone--without your knowledge or consent. According to Matt Erickson, executive director at the Digital Privacy Alliance, that unpleasant scenario is what his colleagues are working against and what Europe's sweeping new privacy regulations taking effect on May 25 are meant to help prevent. During his recent Capitol Hill testimony, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said his company already has controls in place to comply with Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and told lawmakers they'd likely extend some of those protections to its 2.2 billion users globally.


Cancer-fighting robots, hacked tax returns, dumping old PCs and more: Tech Q&A

FOX News

Q: Is there anything that I can do to stop the annoying robocalls promising me free cruises, vacations, and scams? A: It's hard to ignore a robocall because we are trained to respond to every single phone call. Sometimes we can ignore those calls; we don't recognize the number and we don't know anyone in, say, Kalamazoo. Other times, the number looks familiar, and we decide to pick up, walking into the robocaller's trap. Even if you never answer a robocall, the endless vibration in your pocket can drive you bonkers.



Say goodbye to Alexa and Siri, resist the temptations of Google Home and make your life more human!

FOX News

Smart & Safe Tech: Amazon Echo has enabled voice control of smart security devices to keep your home safe.



iPhone X Face ID already tricked by $200 mask

FOX News

It turns out you don't need an evil twin because Apple's Face ID can be hacked using a mask, according to IT security researchers. When Apple announced it was getting rid of Touch ID for facial recognition, the company said it was a more secure option with only a one in 1,000,000 chance of being hacked. "If you happen to have an evil twin, you need to protect your data with a passcode," marketing vice president Phil Schiller joked during Apple's iPhone X announcement. Well, it turns out you don't need an evil twin because Apple's Face ID can be hacked using a mask, according to IT security researchers at Bkav. The researchers didn't use any special software or hacks to bypass Face ID, instead using a 3D printed frame, makeup, a silicone nose and 2D images, along with special processing on the cheeks and around the face where there are large areas of skin.


Tech Q&A: Spy apps, email receipts, secret scanners and more

FOX News

Q: I think someone put a spy program on my phone. Are there programs that will secretly record and send my texts, pics and phone calls to another person? A: Originally, these apps were designed for concerned parents, but it's extremely easy for them to fall into the wrong hands. Once you know the kinds of spy apps there are, you'll have two important follow-up questions: How do you find out whether they're already on your phone, and if they are, how do you remove a spy app before it's too late? Click here for five smartphones apps that could be spying on you, and how to remove them.


iPhone X: Privacy threat?

FOX News

Apple unveiled three new iPhones at its big September event on Tuesday, including the high-end iPhone X, which comes with a new way to unlock the device, known as Face ID. While Apple touted the increased security of its facial recognition technology, it's unclear whether law enforcement could use it against you. "Face ID learns your face. It learns who you are," said Schiller. This includes changes such as growing facial hair, wearing makeup or other alterations people might make to their face.