Information Technology


Will Amazon's facial-recognition tech enable mass surveillance?

FOX News

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos laughs as he talks to the media while touring the new Amazon Spheres during the grand opening at Amazon's Seattle headquarters in Seattle, Washington, U.S., January 29, 2018. Amazon has been selling a facial-recognition system to police, sparking fears that the technology will one day power mass surveillance. On Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union and 35 other advocacy group sent a letter to the company's CEO Jeff Bezos, demanding that he stop providing the technology to law enforcement. The technology, called Amazon Rekognition, can identify people's faces in digital images and video. Police in Oregon and Florida have been using the system to help them solve crimes, but the ACLU argues that it's ripe for abuse.


Autonomous vehicle helped locate 'holy grail of shipwrecks' off Colombia

FOX News

San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle An autonomous vehicle was used in 2015 to locate a Spanish galleon that sunk 300 years ago off the coast of Colombia with $17 billion in treasure, the research team that helped in the discovery said on Monday. The San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The institution said it was holding the discovery under wraps out of respect for the Colombian government. REMUS 6000 being deployed off the Colombian Navy research ship ARC Malpelo. The treasure--which includes of gold, silver and emeralds-- has been the subject of legal battles between several nations as well as private companies.


Google employees resign in protest over controversial Pentagon AI project, report says

FOX News

About a dozen Google employees are resigning in protest over the tech giant's involvement in Project Maven, a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence, Gizmodo reports. Project Maven, which harnesses AI to improve drone targeting, has been a source of concern for a number of Google employees. Last month, over 3,100 Google workers signed a letter to the company's CEO Sundar Pichai asking him to pull the tech giant out of the project. Announced last year, Project Maven is designed to swiftly pull important data from vast quantities of imagery. The tech news website cites an internal Google document containing written accounts from many of the employees that details their decisions to leave.


Sony sells thousands of Aibo robot dogs as it considers US launch

FOX News

Sony Corp's entertainment robot "aibo" is pictured at its demonstration in Tokyo, Japan November 1, 2017. Sony's robotic pet is proving popular with dog-loving tech fans … or is that tech-loving dog fans? The latest version of Aibo launched in Japan in January, with the electronics company this week revealing the highly specific sales figure for the device -- 11,111 units -- for the first three months of this year. Aibo is currently only available in Japan, though Sony says it's considering taking it to the American and Chinese markets, too. It hopes the device can act as a companion for people who might not have the time or means to care for a real dog.


Jeff Bezos wildly overestimates the power of the human brain

FOX News

File photo: Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos laughs as he talks to the media while touring the new Amazon Spheres during the grand opening at Amazon's Seattle headquarters in Seattle, Washington, U.S., January 29, 2018. Jeff Bezos thinks that the brain uses one and a half times as much power as the rest of the body. Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, made the wildly inaccurate scientific claim during an interview with Mathias Döpfner, CEO of the multibillion-dollar German media company Axel Springer. A transcript and video of the interview appeared on Business Insider, an American news site owned by Axel Springer. For part of that time, Bezos was an investor in the site.)


Why Europe's privacy clampdown may not solve Facebook's data scandal woes

FOX News

The latest Fox News Poll finds that nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of current users say they care if Facebook shares their information with others, and a large 43 percent minority have thought about deleting their account in order to protect their privacy. Think about your interaction with Facebook as a relationship. Now, imagine being at dinner with someone new and they say they are recording the conversation, taking your fingerprints, tracking your movements and they are going to share all of that data with everyone--without your knowledge or consent. According to Matt Erickson, executive director at the Digital Privacy Alliance, that unpleasant scenario is what his colleagues are working against and what Europe's sweeping new privacy regulations taking effect on May 25 are meant to help prevent. During his recent Capitol Hill testimony, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said his company already has controls in place to comply with Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and told lawmakers they'd likely extend some of those protections to its 2.2 billion users globally.


Blac Chyna having a baby with 18-year-old boyfriend she met on Christian dating site

FOX News

Model Blac Chyna arrives at the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles, California, August 30, 2015. Blac Chyna is pregnant with her 18-year-old rapper boyfriend YBN Almighty Jay's baby, a source tells Page Six. Jay says the pair met on Christian Mingle in an interview with No Jumper in March and comments on the possibility of having a baby. "I don't wear condoms. . . I would not want to f--- a b---- I did not want to get pregnant," he says.


Amazon is building a domestic robot, report says

FOX News

File photo: Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos laughs as he talks to the media while touring the new Amazon Spheres during the grand opening at Amazon's Seattle headquarters in Seattle, Washington, U.S., January 29, 2018. If a "top-secret" Amazon plan comes to fruition, the online retail giant's next big thing might be home robots. Citing unnamed sources familiar with the company's plans, Bloomberg reports that Amazon is getting serious about building a domestic robot. Think Alexa, but with the ability to move around your home autonomously. The project, codenamed "Vesta" after the Roman goddess of the hearth, home, and family, reportedly kicked off years ago, but has been gaining steam of late.


Construction robots weld, bolt, lift to beat worker shortage

FOX News

TOKYO – Major Japanese construction company Shimizu Corp. has developed robots that can weld, lift and bolt for use at building sites. The company on Monday demonstrated robots that can pick up a pile of boards and take them to an elevator. It says the Robo-Welder and Robo-Buddy, with twisting mechanical arms, will be deployed at construction sites later this year, though because of safety concerns they will be used during night shifts when most human workers are not around. The company said that most construction work is so delicate and complex that the robots can handle only about 1 percent of the work. Japan is undergoing a construction boom but lacks enough workers to do the jobs -- a problem seen in many regions of the world, including the U.S.


Mark Zuckerberg says AI cannot stop online abuse yet, but experts beg to differ

FOX News

Facebook CEO says the social network didn't take a broad enough view of its responsibility. Social media can be an unforgiving place. When country star Carrie Underwood, for example, posted on Instagram about her recent injury that required 40-50 stitches to her face, some followers accused her of over-exaggeration and using the incident as a publicity stunt. With trolls everywhere, what if there was a way for users to block harmful attacks? At a recent Congressional hearing, Mark Zuckerberg noted how AI could possibly help eradicate hate speech and online abuse, but it was still 5-10 years away and in development.