Results


Jamil and Siri: ISIS conflict forces two lives to intersect — and both are saved

FOX News

Soon after Siri and Jamil arrived in Mosul, an ISIS guard threatened to kill Jamil if Siri refused to have sex with him. The rapist, called "The Tunisian," told Siri her situation would improve if she became a Muslim and married him. At the same time, Jamil was the key to Siri's survival. When sitting with Siri and his birth mother, Jamil now always sits closer to Siri, observed Kizilhan observed.


This saves many lives

FOX News

Electronic blind-spot monitoring and lane-keeping systems do help to prevent crashes, according to new studies from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. A second institute study of blind-spot detection systems -- usually warning lights in side mirrors -- found the systems lower the rate of all lane-change crashes by 14 percent and the rate of such crashes with injuries by 23 percent. A separate study by the insurance industry-funded institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's AgeLab found that drivers using automated systems that scan for parking spots and then park the car spend a lot more time looking at dashboard displays than at the parking spot, the road in front or the road behind. Automakers, taking note of the problem, appear to be switching to systems that vibrate the steering wheel or driver's seat, Cicchino said.


Michigan gov: 'Strong possibility' Foxconn opens facility - Foxconn incentives package to cost Wisconsin $50M in lost tax revenue

FOX News

The Taiwanese electronics manufacturer recently announced plans to build a massive $10 billion plant in Wisconsin. In a phone interview from Shanghai, where he was concluding a nine-day trade trip in China, Snyder told the Associated Press Monday night there is a "strong possibility" for Foxconn to still locate in the state after the company in recent weeks picked neighboring Wisconsin for a $10 billion display panel plant with 3,000 employees that could grow to 13,000. They discussed the autonomous vehicle industry and advanced manufacturing, Snyder said. But we're going to continue to present them good opportunities of what we can do in Michigan."


Trump intervenes to let Afghan teens attend robot competition in US

FOX News

U.S. officials have reportedly decided to allow a group of Afghan girls, who has previously been denied entry, into the U.S. to attend a robot competition. Following the change, the State Department said it worked with the Department of Homeland Security to remedy the situation. "The State Department worked incredibly well with the Department of Homeland Security to ensure that this case was reviewed and handled appropriately," Dina Powell, White House deputy national security adviser for strategy, said in a statement, according to Politico. I look forward to welcoming this brilliant team of Afghan girls, and their competitors, to Washington DC next week!


New tech predicts when you DIE

FOX News

Thats because scientists from the University of Adelaide in Australia have used deep learning technology to analyze the computerized tomography (CT) scans of patient organs, in what could one day serve as an early warning system to catch heart disease, cancer, and other diseases early so that intervention can take place. The AI analyzes CT scans to make its decisions. For one thing, the AIs 70-percent predictive accuracy when looking at scans is in line with the manual predictions made by experts. We used a very small cohort of 48 patients in this study to show that our approach can work, but in general deep learning works better if you can give it much more data.


Do you look like your name?

FOX News

In the study, researchers found that people could correctly match an unfamiliar face to that person's name at a rate higher than expected due to chance, according to a new study. The study found that French participants could accurately identify a Veronique nearly 80 percent of the time, while Israeli participants could accurately recognize a Tom more than 52 percent of the time. In one of the study's eight experiments, French study participants were unable to match Israeli names and faces at a level above random chance, and this same effect was observed when Israeli participants were asked to match French names and faces. If, for example, society assumes that people with the name Katherine share a similar stereotype, including those based on her appearance, then people will interact with a woman named Katherine in a way that matches this shared stereotype, Zwebner explained.


End of the taxi?

FOX News

New York City's entire taxi fleet -- nearly 13,250 vehicles -- could be replaced by just 3,000 ridesharing cars if these services were optimized, according to a new study from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). CSAIL's Daniela Rus and her team created an algorithm that crunched data from three million New York City taxi rides, calculating routes and schedules for two-person, four-person, and ten-person vehicles. The results showed that 3,000 four-person cabs could help handle 98 percent of the City's demand (with a waiting time of 2.3 minutes), while 3,000 two-person cabs could handle 94 percent and just 2,000 ten-person vehicles could handle 95 percent. "To our knowledge, this is the first time that scientists have been able to experimentally quantify the trade-off between fleet size, capacity, waiting time, travel delay, and operational costs for a range of vehicles, from taxis to vans and shuttles," Rus said in a press release.


A bird that needs goggles?

FOX News

As the bird flaps its way through the water particles, its wings generate disruptive waves, tracing patterns that help scientists understand how animals fly. In a new study, a team of scientists measured and analyzed the particle trails that were produced by the goggle-wearing parrot's test flights, and showed that previous computer models of wing movement aren't as accurate as they once thought. "We were surprised to find the vortices that are usually drawn in papers and text books as beautiful donut rings turned out to break up dramatically after two to three wing beats," Lentink told Live Science in an email. Creating better models will be an important next step for studying animal flight, Lentink told Live Science.


'Like science fiction': Woman gives birth to son using her mother's womb - How a 'crazy' request for a new womb made history

FOX News

In her early 20s, Eriksson began reading about scientists attempting to create organs from stem cells and was told about the womb transplant research being pursued by Brannstrom. "But maybe now there was a small, small chance for me." The night before her and her mother's operations, Eriksson said, was the first time that she was genuinely afraid, mostly because her mother was terrified of the anesthesia. Brannstrom's team transferred a single embryo into her womb, which Eriksson and Chrysong had created during in-vitro fertilization.