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Pakistan: Killing of Pakistan Taliban chief 'significant'

FOX News

ISLAMABAD – Pakistani caretaker Prime Minister Nasir-ul-Mulk has described the killing of Pakistani Taliban chief Mullah Fazlullah in a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan as a "significant development in the fight against terrorism." Mulk made the comment in a telephone conversation with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and thanked him for sharing information about Fazlullah's killing. The call was initiated by Ghani. A government statement says an "action had finally been taken against an enemy of the people and state of Pakistan." Mulk told Ghani the news about Fazlullah's death would be received throughout Pakistan with relief as Pakistanis had borne the brunt of terrorist attacks by the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan, which Fazlullah headed.


US drone strike kills Pakistani Taliban leader who ordered Malala Yousafzai assassination, Afghanistan says

FOX News

Nov. 7, 2013: Pakistani Taliban leader Mullah Fazlullah is seen on television at a coffee shop in Islamabad. The Pakistani Taliban leader known for beheading police officers and even ordering the assassination of Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai has been killed by a U.S. drone strike, Afghanistan's Defense Ministry says. Mohammad Radmanish told the Associated Press on Friday that Mullah Fazlullah, the ruthless insurgent leader, died along with two other terrorists a day earlier in the Marawara district along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. A statement attributed to U.S. Forces-Afghanistan spokesman Lt. Col Martin O'Donnell said an American "counterterrorism strike" was carried out in the region targeting "a senior leader of a designated terrorist organization," but did not say whether it had killed anyone. Fazlullah previously ordered the bombing and beheadings of dozens of opponents when his band of insurgents controlled Pakistan's picturesque Swat Valley from 2007 until a massive military operation routed them in 2009.


Pakistan Taliban leader killed in US drone strike, Afghan officials say

FOX News

Pakistan Taliban leader Mullah Fazlullah was killed in a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan, the Afghan Defense Ministry announced Friday. The U.S. military said Thursday it had carried out an airstrike targeting a senior militant in northeastern Kunar, according to Reuters. A U.S. official told the news agency the target was believed to be Fazlullah. Four other senior Taliban militants were also killed in the strike, The New York Times reported. Fazlullah is considered one of the most-wanted Pakistan militants and is believed to be behind the attacks on Pakistani security officials and civilians.


Afghan official: US drone kills Pakistan Taliban chief

FOX News

KABUL, Afghanistan – An Afghan Defense Ministry official says a U.S. drone strike in northeastern Kunar province has killed Pakistan Taliban chief Mullah Fazlullah. Defense Ministry spokesman Mohammad Radmanish tells The Associated Press in a telephone interview Friday that Fazlullah and two other insurgents were killed early Thursday morning. According to a statement attributed to U.S. Forces-Afghanistan spokesman, Lt. Col Martin O'Donnell, the U.S. carried out a "counterterrorism strike" Thursday near in the border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan targeting "a senior leader of a designated terrorist organization." The statement did not say whether the strike had killed anyone and did not identify Fazlullah as the target. Radmanish said the attack took place in Marawara district, near the border.


21 clever Alexa commands you will use again and again

FOX News

More than any other device, Alexa has become our closest approximation of artificial intelligence. She has a voice and personality, and if you ask the right question, she'll even get sassy with you. Users even refer to Alexa as "she." We usually prefer to say her name, rather than the name of the device itself, Amazon Echo. Recently, Alexa has made the news as it was reported that a Portland, Oregon couple's Echo recorded their conversation and sent it to a friend on their contact list.


1 US soldier killed, 4 wounded in attack in Somalia

FOX News

WASHINGTON – One U.S. special operations soldier was killed and four U.S. service members wounded in an "enemy attack" Friday in Somalia, the U.S. military said -- casualties that are likely to put renewed scrutiny on America's counterterror operations in Africa. It's the first public announcement of a U.S. military combat death on the continent since four U.S. service members were killed in a militant ambush in the west African nation of Niger in October. U.S. Africa Command said in a statement that U.S. troops with Somali and Kenyan forces came under mortar and small-arms fire in Jubaland, Somalia, at around 2.45 p.m. local time. One member of the "partner forces" was wounded. One of the wounded U.S. service members received sufficient medical care in the field, and the other three were medically evacuated for additional treatment.


Massive Mars discovery: Organic molecules 'fundamental to our search for life' found by NASA rover

FOX News

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has found organic molecules on Mars, the space agency revealed in a major announcement Thursday During a press conference at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Goddard, Md., and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., scientists noted that the molecules provide fresh insight into the Red Planet. "We found organic molecules in rocks from an ancient lake bed," explained Jen Eigenbrode, research scientist at Goddard. A variety of molecules were identified, she added. While NASA was at pains to explain that it has not discovered life on Mars, the organic molecules could provide vital clues. "Organic compounds are fundamental to our search for life," said Paul Mahaffy, director of the Solar System Exploration Division at Goddard.


Marc Thiessen: Shame on Google for treating the US military as evil

FOX News

According to a new report, Google will not seek another contract for Project Maven, a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence to improve drone targeting. WASHINGTON -- Giving in to pressure from its workforce, Google recently announced that it is pulling out of Project Maven, a groundbreaking Pentagon program to harness artificial intelligence to sift through and interpret video imagery from drones. The move came after an uprising by 4,000 Google employees who signed a letter urging the company to cancel Project Maven and promise to never "build warfare technology." In their letter, the employees said that working with the Pentagon would violate Google's longtime motto "Don't Be Evil" and "irreparably damage Google's brand." Are they saying that the U.S. military is evil?


Xbox One to Support Alexa, Google Assistant, report says

FOX News

File photo: Kareem Choudhry, Xbox Vice President, introduces the Xbox One X gaming console during the Xbox E3 2017 media briefing in Los Angeles, California, U.S., June 11, 2017. It's already possible to use a digital assistant with the Xbox One games consoles, but your options are quite limited. Microsoft, as you'd expect, integrated Cortana functionality. However, using Cortana requires having the now defunct Kinect hooked up, or relying on the microphone in a headset. That could soon change, though, as there's evidence Microsoft is opening up Xbox to other assistants.


Google set to end controversial Project Maven military AI program, report says

FOX News

File photo - A Google carpet is seen at the entrance of the new headquarters of Google France before its official inauguration in Paris, France Dec. 6, 2011. Google will not seek another contract for Project Maven, a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence to improve drone targeting, according to Gizmodo. Citing three sources with knowledge of the matter, Gizmodo reports that Google will not seek another contract when the current Project Maven contract expires in 2019. The decision was announced by Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene at a meeting with employees Friday morning, it said. Greene reportedly cited the backlash against Project Maven, adding that the firm plans to announce new ethical principles about AI next week.