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Driver in fatal self-driving Uber crash was reportedly watching 'The Voice'

FOX News

Raw video: Cameras mounted inside the car catches the fatal moment. Authorites are investigating the cause of the crash. A police report released Thursday on the deadly self-driving Uber accident in March reportedly revealed that the female backup driver had been watching "The Voice" prior to the crash. The report from police in Tempe, Arizona, indicated that the crash could have been prevented had the driver, Rafaela Vasquez, not been watching the show, The Associated Press reported. Elaine Herzberg, 49, was killed in the March 18 crash - believed to be the first of its kind - after being struck by the autonomous vehicle while walking outside of the crosswalk, authorities said at the time.


Army builds robot attack tanks and ground war drones

FOX News

File photo - Troopers with the U.S. Army 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division fire the main gun round at a target during unit gunnery practice with newly acquired M1A1-SA Abrams tanks at Fort Stewart, Georgia, U.S. March 29, 2018. Picture taken March 29, 2018. The Army is engineering high-tech autonomy kits designed to give "robot" tanks and other armored combat vehicles an ability to operate with little or no human intervention, bringing new tactical and operational dimensions to the future of ground combat. Unmanned systems, utilized in a fast-evolving, high-threat ground combat operation, could enable robot vehicles to carry supplies, test enemy defenses and even fire weapons – all while manned vehicles operate at a safer distance. "A kit of hardware and software can be installed into different ground platforms to increase the level of autonomy," Osie David, Chief Engineer for Mission Command, Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, told Warrior Maven in an interview.


Tesla car on Autopilot when fatal crash occurred, company says

FOX News

Tesla defended its Autopilot feature, saying that while it doesn't prevent all accidents, it makes them less likely to occur than vehicles without it. The Tesla vehicle involved in a fatal crash last month in Northern California was operating on Autopilot, the automaker has confirmed. But Tesla contends that the victim and a damaged freeway barrier share in the blame. The Model X SUV crashed in Mountain View, in California's Silicon Valley, on March 23, killing its driver, Apple engineer Walter Huang, 38. The electric car maker said in a company blog post that the driver did not have his hands on the steering wheel for six seconds before the crash, despite several warnings from the vehicle.


Dashcam video of deadly self-driving Uber crash released

FOX News

Raw video: Cameras mounted inside the car catches the fatal moment. Authorites are investigating the cause of the crash. Dashcam video was released Wednesday night showing the dramatic and deadly crash of a self-driving Uber SUV in Arizona -- as the woman operating the vehicle had her head down. Two angles -- interior and exterior camera footage -- were released by the Tempe Police Department. Officials did not release the moment the pedestrian, identified as 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, was hit, "due to the graphic nature of the impact."


Despite deadly crash, no signs that all Arizona autonomous car tests are being frozen

FOX News

An Arizona woman was killed after being struck by a self-driving Uber vehicle, an incident believed to be the first of its kind. But Uber is not the only company that has experienced accidents with driverless cars. Companies like Google, Tesla and General Motors also join the list. Uber has suspended tests of its autonomous cars on public roads in Arizona in the wake of a deadly crash involving one of the vehicles in Tempe, but it's not yet clear if other automakers will follow suit or be forced to do so by the state government. The incident unfolded late Sunday when 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg was struck by a 2017 Volvo XC90 SUV equipped with Uber's autonomous technology as she was walking her bicycle across a four-lane street midblock, outside of any crosswalk.


Where are self-driving cars being tested?

FOX News

An Arizona woman was killed after being struck by a self-driving Uber vehicle, an incident believed to be the first of its kind. But Uber is not the only company that has experienced accidents with driverless cars. Companies like Google, Tesla and General Motors also join the list. An Arizona woman was killed after being struck by a self-driving Uber vehicle this week - prompting the company to suspend all testing of self-driving vehicles in cities across the country. The Uber was in autonomous mode at the time of the collision in Tempe, and there was a vehicle operator behind the wheel, police said.


Self-driving Uber car kills Arizona pedestrian, police say

FOX News

Police report that the vehicle was in self-driving mode but there was an operator behind the wheel when it hit a woman walking outside of a crosswalk. Officials said an Arizona woman was killed after being struck by a self-driving Uber vehicle early Monday -- an incident believed to be the first of its kind. The accident in the Phoenix suburb of Tempe caused the company to pause all testing of self-driving vehicles in cities across the country. Ronald Elcock told FOX10 Phoenix the woman was walking outside of a crosswalk when she was struck by the vehicle. The woman was taken to a nearby hospital, where she later died, according to police.


California OKs autonomous car testing without backup drivers

FOX News

Driverless cars will be tested in California for the first time without a person behind a steering wheel under new rules that state regulators approved Monday for the fast-developing technology. The regulations are a major step toward getting autonomous vehicles to dealerships and onto the streets of California, where companies such as Tesla and Waymo are leading the way on the technology. Until now, driverless cars could only be tested on public roads in the state if a person could take the wheel in an emergency. "I think this is a move that had to happen for California to stay competitive in this field," said Nidhi Kalra, a Rand Corp. senior scientist who has been studying the issue for a decade. Although the technology is being developed in California, companies such as Waymo have already been testing in other states such as neighboring Arizona because requiring a human driver limits the kind of car that can be tested, she said.



8 amazing new AI innovations at CES 2018

FOX News

In 2018, the evolution will not focus as much on faster phones or bigger televisions (although those things will happen). Instead, artificial intelligence will evolve, likely faster than any of us can predict. To give you a hint of what's to come, here are a few gadgets at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas that push the AI envelope. Cameras already recognize us -- just try the new iPhone X. But this smart baby monitor camera can even tell if the infant is breathing and send you real-time data and alerts.