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drones-become-newest-crime-fighting-tool-for-police.html

FOX News

Just one week after the sheriff's department in Cecil County, Md., got its brand new drone up and running, it was asked to investigate a case of stolen construction equipment. So the Cecil County Sheriff sent his Typhoon H Pro to investigate. The sheriff's department in Somerset County, N.J., hopes its drones could help it find missing people. "Years ago, when we had people wander off, we would bring out the rescue department, the fire department, fire department volunteers, K-9 if we had it and we'd search and search and search and never find the person," said Somerset County Sheriff Frank Provensano.


Mind reading robot?

FOX News

The group's new software takes a novel approach to guessing what is going on inside a human brain, using data gathered from brain scans via fMRI to predict human thoughts by seeing how the pattern of brain activity that produces them, then detecting it in reverse. "One of the big advances of the human brain was the ability to combine individual concepts into complex thoughts," lead researcher Marcel Just explains. The discovery of this correspondence between thoughts and brain activation patterns tells us what the thoughts are built of." The algorithm was then trained using this data, and learned to detect the same patterns occurring again, accurately predicting what a person was about to say a stunning 90% of the time.


ZAP your own brain

FOX News

No, its not the worst writers room scenario ever, but an experiment into brain stimulation carried out by researchers at the U.K.s Queen Mary University of London and Goldsmiths University of London. When the transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) technique was used to suppress a key part of the frontal brain called the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, participants were shown to get better at carrying out creative tasks involving out-of-the-box thinking. However, since the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a part of the brain heavily involved in much of our reasoning processes, they got worse at solving problems in which many items needed to be held in mind at once. These patients were more likely to solve hard think out of the box problems, which was remarkable evidence that this brain region might hinder creative problem solving.


Musk: Robots will be better!

FOX News

The performance of humans' puny brains will be outmatched by computers within just 13 years, billionaire Elon Musk has claimed. According to the terrifying research from boffs at the University of Oxford, it's not looking good for us humans. Within ten years computers will be better at driving a truck than us and by 2031 they will be better at selling goods and will put millions of retail workers on the dole queue. In fact, every single human job will be automated within the next 120 years, according to computer experts the university researchers quizzed.


Top 10 technologies for 2017

FOX News

The technology is based on reinforcement learning, documented more than a 100 years ago by psychologist Edward Thorndike. People experience the world in 360 degrees -- now consumer cameras can too. Today, you can grab a good 360-degree camera for under $500. Interesting applications include journalists using low-cost 360 cameras to document news, including this New York Times video that can be panned 360 degrees showing the devastation left by ISIS in Palmyra, Syria.


SMOKING GUN? Robot uses Gatling-style chip to study human lungs

FOX News

Researchers working to discover more about how smoke impacts people's health have developed an artificial human lung "airway on a chip" and a smoking robot to carry out more accurate tests. The work will help further our understanding of conditions like Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), an irreversible inflammatory disease of the lung's small airways, and will aid with investigations into newer smoking-related trends like vaping. You can tune its puffing frequency, intensity and intervals -- and then observe what happens as the smoke is fed from the machine and passed through the airspace of the small airway chip." The "lung airway chip" technology is just the latest in a series of "organs-on-chips" -- microengineered cell culture devices that are sweeping the medical research world.


'Like science fiction': Woman gives birth to son using her mother's womb - How a 'crazy' request for a new womb made history

FOX News

In her early 20s, Eriksson began reading about scientists attempting to create organs from stem cells and was told about the womb transplant research being pursued by Brannstrom. "But maybe now there was a small, small chance for me." The night before her and her mother's operations, Eriksson said, was the first time that she was genuinely afraid, mostly because her mother was terrified of the anesthesia. Brannstrom's team transferred a single embryo into her womb, which Eriksson and Chrysong had created during in-vitro fertilization.