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This artificial intelligence can detect if someone is having suicidal thoughts

FOX News

Artificial intelligence could one day be used to help identify a person contemplating suicide. Around 800,000 people die a year from suicide, according to the World Health Organization. It's currently the second-leading cause of death in the U.S. among people between the ages of 15 and 24. But a new study is using brain scans and AI to show how someone experiencing suicidal thoughts thinks differently about life and death. The results were published in Nature Human Behavior.


Scientists have designed virtual human brain cells

FOX News

For centuries, scientists who have dedicated their lives to studying the human brain have attempted to unlock its mysteries. The role the brain plays in human personality -- as well as the myriad of disorders and conditions that come along with it -- is often difficult to study because studying the organ while it's still functioning in a human body is complicated. Now, researchers at The Allen Institute for Brain Science have introduced a new tool that could make such study a whole lot easier: functioning virtual brain cells. The fully 3D computer models of living human brain tissue are based on actual brain samples that were left over after surgery, and present what could be the most powerful testbed for studying the human brain ever created. The samples used to construct the virtual models was healthy tissue that was removed during brain operations, and represents parts of the brain that are typically associated with thoughts and consciousness, as well as memory.



drones-become-newest-crime-fighting-tool-for-police.html

FOX News

Just one week after the sheriff's department in Cecil County, Md., got its brand new drone up and running, it was asked to investigate a case of stolen construction equipment. So the Cecil County Sheriff sent his Typhoon H Pro to investigate. The sheriff's department in Somerset County, N.J., hopes its drones could help it find missing people. "Years ago, when we had people wander off, we would bring out the rescue department, the fire department, fire department volunteers, K-9 if we had it and we'd search and search and search and never find the person," said Somerset County Sheriff Frank Provensano.


Mind reading robot?

FOX News

The group's new software takes a novel approach to guessing what is going on inside a human brain, using data gathered from brain scans via fMRI to predict human thoughts by seeing how the pattern of brain activity that produces them, then detecting it in reverse. "One of the big advances of the human brain was the ability to combine individual concepts into complex thoughts," lead researcher Marcel Just explains. The discovery of this correspondence between thoughts and brain activation patterns tells us what the thoughts are built of." The algorithm was then trained using this data, and learned to detect the same patterns occurring again, accurately predicting what a person was about to say a stunning 90% of the time.


ZAP your own brain

FOX News

No, its not the worst writers room scenario ever, but an experiment into brain stimulation carried out by researchers at the U.K.s Queen Mary University of London and Goldsmiths University of London. When the transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) technique was used to suppress a key part of the frontal brain called the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, participants were shown to get better at carrying out creative tasks involving out-of-the-box thinking. However, since the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a part of the brain heavily involved in much of our reasoning processes, they got worse at solving problems in which many items needed to be held in mind at once. These patients were more likely to solve hard think out of the box problems, which was remarkable evidence that this brain region might hinder creative problem solving.


Musk: Robots will be better!

FOX News

The performance of humans' puny brains will be outmatched by computers within just 13 years, billionaire Elon Musk has claimed. According to the terrifying research from boffs at the University of Oxford, it's not looking good for us humans. Within ten years computers will be better at driving a truck than us and by 2031 they will be better at selling goods and will put millions of retail workers on the dole queue. In fact, every single human job will be automated within the next 120 years, according to computer experts the university researchers quizzed.


Top 10 technologies for 2017

FOX News

The technology is based on reinforcement learning, documented more than a 100 years ago by psychologist Edward Thorndike. People experience the world in 360 degrees -- now consumer cameras can too. Today, you can grab a good 360-degree camera for under $500. Interesting applications include journalists using low-cost 360 cameras to document news, including this New York Times video that can be panned 360 degrees showing the devastation left by ISIS in Palmyra, Syria.


Race to find a cure

FOX News

If Zoe Dewaghe wants ice cream for breakfast, she gets ice cream for breakfast. There's a different set of rules for her younger brother, Zach: He gets oatmeal instead. That's because five-year-old Zoe Dewaghe has a rare genetic disease called Sanfilippo syndrome. She'll gradually lose the ability to speak, to move, to recognize her surroundings. Most patients don't live into adulthood.


Scientists develop robotic hand for people with quadriplegia

FOX News

Scientists have developed a mind-controlled robotic hand that allows people with certain types of spinal injuries to perform everyday tasks such as using a fork or drinking from a cup. The low-cost device was tested in Spain on six people with quadriplegia affecting their ability to grasp or manipulate objects. By wearing a cap that measures electric brain activity and eye movement the users were able to send signals to a tablet computer that controlled the glove-like device attached to their hand. Participants in the small-scale study were able to perform daily activities better with the robotic hand than without, according to results published Tuesday in the journal Science Robotics. The principle of using brain-controlled robotic aids to assist people with quadriplegia isn't new.