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Robot tax coming?

FOX News

One city supervisor, Norman Yee, has proposed barring food delivery robots from city streets, arguing that public sidewalks should be solely for people. "Preposterous" is what William Santana Li, CEO of security robot maker Knightscope calls the supervisor's idea. Kim, the San Francisco supervisor, is weighing the idea of using revenue from a robot tax to supplement the low wages of people whose jobs can't be automated, like home health care aides. Savioke, based in San Jose, makes 3-foot-tall (91 centimeters) robots – called Relay – that deliver room service at hotels where only one person might be on duty at night.


steve-robot-cop-is-on-life-support-after-near-drowning-but-may-work-again.html

FOX News

Steve the autonomous security robot made international headlines earlier this week after he accidentally toppled into a fountain while on duty at the Washington Harbour complex in Washington, D.C. Left submerged and useless after water flooded his vital components (which is what tends to happen when land-based robots come into contact with liquids), a severely sodden Steve was hauled from the pool and returned to his maker for checks. The company, a Silicon Valley-based outfit called Knightscope, has been developing its 6-foot, 400-pound K5 robot cop since 2013. When functioning properly, the sensor- and camera-equipped K5 works alongside human security personnel and is programmed to spot suspicious characters or behavior. It also released a photo (above) showing another K5 standing forlornly, if robots can stand forlornly, at a memorial for Steve.


The real life Mr. Roboto

FOX News

He uses a process called deep neural learning along with artificial intelligence to decode different genres of music eventually creating his own chimes on the marimba. Dr. Gil Weinberg, the director of the Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology, created Shimon nearly 10 years ago, but now the robot musician has learned how to do things on his own. Shimon uses "deep neural networks," Bretan says, to learn from the over 5,000 songs in his memory banks. Shimon now thinks like a human musician as he composes his songs rather than from note to note as he did before.


Toyota now has a robot that can help disabled people around the house

FOX News

And with that, the company has shown off its Human Support Robot (HSR), after testing it with a U.S. war veteran in his home. We see our research with Romy and the HSR as a natural extension of our work as a mobility company that helps people navigate their world." Since then, the company has experimented with robots in a number of different applications, including helping paralyzed people walk. In 2015, Toyota created the Toyota Research Institute, saying it would put $1 billion into it over five years, to help advance artificial intelligence and different mobility solutions, including robots.


Musk: Robots will be better!

FOX News

The performance of humans' puny brains will be outmatched by computers within just 13 years, billionaire Elon Musk has claimed. According to the terrifying research from boffs at the University of Oxford, it's not looking good for us humans. Within ten years computers will be better at driving a truck than us and by 2031 they will be better at selling goods and will put millions of retail workers on the dole queue. In fact, every single human job will be automated within the next 120 years, according to computer experts the university researchers quizzed.


Westworld to REAL world

FOX News

Sagar, an artificial intelligence programmer, creates incredibly realistic virtual humans which can respond to questions and learn from experience. But Sagar believes robotic, human life renditions of his avatars will be coming to our living rooms by 2027. He said: "We have been working on the deepest aspect of the technology - biologically-inspired cognitive architectures. But Sagar believes robotic, human life renditions of his avatars will be coming to our living rooms by 2027.


See robots teach other robots

FOX News

Motion planning systems robots are accurate, but they require hand coding, which is often time-consuming. The C-LEARN solution gives non-coders the ability to teach robots various tasks using information about manipulating objects in a single demonstration. Once the systems were in place, Optimus successfully transferred the learned skills to Atlas, a 6-foot-tall 400 lb. In manufacturing, for example, traditional robots must be carefully programmed for each specific task," wrote MIT CSAIL Ph.D. student, Claudia Perez-D'Arpino in an email to Fox News.


Robots with artificial skin?

FOX News

And this month, a team of Oxford professors proposed a provocative idea -- grow human tissue on humanoid robots. In a review published this month in the journal Science Robotics, Mouthuy and Carr explore a the concept of growing human transplant tissue on "humanoid bioreactors." "We have always been well aware of the technological developments that are being made in robotics, and in particular in musculoskeletal humanoid research," Mouthuy said. "Musculoskeletal humanoids, which mimic the human body's skeletal structure, are rapidly becoming better at mimicking natural body movements.


Helping ill kids attend school

FOX News

Indeed, by linking to the Cloud, robots are bringing homebound students into classrooms, hallways and cafeterias to socialize with their friends and continue learning--in school. "Machine learning, big data and the Cloud allow for robots to do more things that are more challenging and more human-like," said Fred Heger, senior research scientist at Vecna, who is working on areas like robotic cooperation--how robots interact with other robots and with humans. For example, a robot working in a healthcare environment needs to look "trustworthy but not scary, but not so cute that people question its ability to do real work," said Amanda Baldi, Vecna director of marketing. The robot's ability to interact effectively with humans is all tied to the Cloud, from which it can ask questions and get answers.


‘Alexa, order me Starbucks’

FOX News

The coffee chain is testing a new feature within its iOS app and a skill for Amazon Alexa devices, both of which let customers place orders with just their voice. The new voice-ordering features are an extension of Starbucks Mobile Order & Pay, which lets you order and pay for items before arriving at the store. Starbucks is also launching a Reorder Skill for Amazon's Alexa platform that leverages Starbucks Mobile Order & Pay to let customers order their "usual" food and beverage items. Starbucks says its Mobile Order & Pay feature makes up more than 7 percent of transactions in US stores.