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Why Europe's privacy clampdown may not solve Facebook's data scandal woes

FOX News

The latest Fox News Poll finds that nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of current users say they care if Facebook shares their information with others, and a large 43 percent minority have thought about deleting their account in order to protect their privacy. Think about your interaction with Facebook as a relationship. Now, imagine being at dinner with someone new and they say they are recording the conversation, taking your fingerprints, tracking your movements and they are going to share all of that data with everyone--without your knowledge or consent. According to Matt Erickson, executive director at the Digital Privacy Alliance, that unpleasant scenario is what his colleagues are working against and what Europe's sweeping new privacy regulations taking effect on May 25 are meant to help prevent. During his recent Capitol Hill testimony, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said his company already has controls in place to comply with Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and told lawmakers they'd likely extend some of those protections to its 2.2 billion users globally.


Tech Q&A: Eavesdropping Echo, flammable laptops, switching to Android and more

FOX News

Want to know more about Amazon Echo, the HP laptop battery recall, ransomware, web printing and switching to Android? I have an Amazon Echo. I am really concerned it is listening all the time. Does it have any privacy settings? A: The fact remains that Echo records all of your commands, and the microphone is always active because the device is always listening for a "wake phrase."



How to stop your devices from listening to (and saving) everything you say

FOX News

File photo: This product image provided by Amazon shows the Amazon Echo. Yes, voice technology is amazing. You can ask your phone a question. You can talk to your speaker system and book an Uber. With the right setup, your voice can lock the doors, dim the lights and change the thermostat.


iPhone X: Privacy threat?

FOX News

Apple unveiled three new iPhones at its big September event on Tuesday, including the high-end iPhone X, which comes with a new way to unlock the device, known as Face ID. While Apple touted the increased security of its facial recognition technology, it's unclear whether law enforcement could use it against you. "Face ID learns your face. It learns who you are," said Schiller. This includes changes such as growing facial hair, wearing makeup or other alterations people might make to their face.


drones-become-newest-crime-fighting-tool-for-police.html

FOX News

Just one week after the sheriff's department in Cecil County, Md., got its brand new drone up and running, it was asked to investigate a case of stolen construction equipment. So the Cecil County Sheriff sent his Typhoon H Pro to investigate. The sheriff's department in Somerset County, N.J., hopes its drones could help it find missing people. "Years ago, when we had people wander off, we would bring out the rescue department, the fire department, fire department volunteers, K-9 if we had it and we'd search and search and search and never find the person," said Somerset County Sheriff Frank Provensano.


how-artificial-intelligence-could-battle-sexual-harassment-in-workplace.html

FOX News

This could happen as employees increasingly use workplace tools like Slack and Microsoft Teams, send emails using a corporate server or text using company-managed apps. "In the same way, AI can use the data-analysis technology (such as data monitoring) to determine if sexually suggestive communications are being sent." Flores says AI could be seen as a reporting tool to scan messages and determine if an innocuous comment could be misinterpreted. "If we had the AI super-nanny that could monitor speech and gesture, action and emails in the workplace, scanning tirelessly for infractions and harassment it would inevitably exchange a sexual-harassment free workplace for an oppressive work environment," he adds.


Top Amazon Echo tips

FOX News

If you own an Amazon Echo, you probably know its strange secret: The device records a lot of what you say. Deep inside that dark tower, Echo keeps a vast trove of recordings. Your friends' voices are preserved. Anyone who has ever been to your house and said, "Alexa!" On the upside, this amazing technology puts instant information a voice command away.


Need a doctor? Just ask Alexa

FOX News

Now, if you need to talk to a doctor, you don't need to leave the comfort of your home. Amazon's (AMZN) Alexa is no longer just for checking the weather, playing music or shopping online. With a new app, you can now talk to Alexa about any health issues you may have. The Dr. A.I. app accesses data the company has collected over the years to help provide users with health information. Any time that you actually provide a set of symptoms in the context it will take the relevant data point, in this case it can be thousands, it can be tens of thousands of doctors' opinions that came over the years," Gutman told the FOX Business Network's Maria Bartiromo.


FBI using 400 million photos for facial recognition

FOX News

You may be right to be paranoid about government surveillance and tracking, because the FBI may not be playing by even its own rules. A report released Wednesday by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) revealed that the FBI's facial-recognition systems have access to 411.9 million photos of individuals, far more than the 29.7 million previously disclosed. If you've got a passport, or hold a driver's license from Illinois, Michigan, Texas, North Carolina or a dozen other states, you're probably in there. The GAO report also criticized the FBI for not adequately performing required assessments of the systems' impact on privacy. The 382 million additional images the public was not aware of until yesterday were obtained by the FBI from the Department of State, which provided photos from passports and visa applications; the Department of Defense, which provided photos of persons detained by American military forces; and from driver's-license, arrest and prison records held by 16 states.