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Myanmar charges foreign journalists, others for flying drone

FOX News

YANGON, Myanmar – Myanmar authorities have charged two foreign journalists, a local freelancer who works as an interpreter and their driver for allegedly flying drones illegally over and around the government's parliament buildings, police said Sunday. Mok Choy Lin, a Malaysian, and Lau Hon Meng, a Singaporean, journalists for Turkish Radio and Television, were detained along with their local interpreter and freelance journalist Aung Naing Soe after flying drones over the parliament building on Friday, police said. The four were charged under the Export and Import Law and face up to three years in prison if found guilty, police said, adding that a trial would begin at the end of a 15-day remand. Police officer San Aung said the drone was imported without permission. The detained journalists and driver have not been allowed to see family members since the arrest on Friday, one of the family members said.


Alexa can help in the kitchen

FOX News

Amazon's virtual assistant, Alexa, has become commonplace in many homes, picking your music and helping you book Uber rides. Many Alexa commands make Amazon's Echo essential. One caveat: Some Amazon Echo Show owners have reported that recipes quickly disappear from the screen. This is why the Ad Council and the Natural Resources Defense Council created the Save the Food Alexa skill, which aims to reduce waste by helping you use up your food before it goes bad.


Big SHOCK at Disney

FOX News

Janielle and Elijah Gilmour, ages 12 and 10, got the surprise of a lifetime in April, when foster parents Courtney and Tom Gilmour announced news of their official adoption date during a visit to Walt Disney World. "We planned it as soon as we got the [official] date, which was the Friday before our trip," Courtney tells Fox News. Courtney and Tom Gilmour had been foster parents to Janielle and Elijah for three years. "We are all happy Gilmours," Courtney tells Fox News.


'Like science fiction': Woman gives birth to son using her mother's womb - How a 'crazy' request for a new womb made history

FOX News

In her early 20s, Eriksson began reading about scientists attempting to create organs from stem cells and was told about the womb transplant research being pursued by Brannstrom. "But maybe now there was a small, small chance for me." The night before her and her mother's operations, Eriksson said, was the first time that she was genuinely afraid, mostly because her mother was terrified of the anesthesia. Brannstrom's team transferred a single embryo into her womb, which Eriksson and Chrysong had created during in-vitro fertilization.