Engadget







Which true wireless earbuds are worth buying?

Engadget

The original Gear IconX delivered lots of good features for a first-generation product, including onboard media storage and heart rate tracking. But those positives were outweighed by poor battery life, an unreliable connection and buttons that could be awkward to use while the device was being worn...



The Morning After: Apple HomePod, reviewed

Engadget

Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. Happy Valentine's Day! Now that's out of the way, we've got Apple's HomePod review (great sound, not so smart), adorable robot skiers and problems with Star Trek Discovery. The company's first smart speaker sounds great, but is that enough? Apple HomePod revie...


Vizio SmartCast TVs now play nice with Alexa

Engadget

Today, Vizio announced that owners of select TV models can now control displays with their voices, thanks to a new Amazon Alexa skill. All 2016 and 2017 SmartCast P-, M- and E-Series 4K models are compatible with this new feature. The 2018 Full HD and HD models will also be able to take advantage of the Alexa skill in coming weeks. The displays will respond to volume, channel, power and input setting changes with a voice command. Users can also fast forward, rewind and pause on some apps. Note that Alexa isn't built into the display; this is a skill integration, so it requires an Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Show or any other piece of Alexa-enabled hardware to work. To activate this Alexa skill, download the Amazon Alexa app. Make sure you're signed into the app, and that your Alexa-enabled speaker or product is set up. If your Vizio's Quick Start mode isn't enabled, you'll want to toggle that on or Alexa will not be able to turn on your display. On your Vizio remote, launch Smartcast TV, and then press the up arrow. Click "Extras" on the menu bar that appears, then go to "Voice Settings" and "Pair Display." Now, on your phone, go to the website address that appears on your Vizio. Create a My Vizio account (or enter your username and password if you have already done that) and sign in. Finally, enter the PIN on your TV screen. You can see a step by step guide in the video below.


ARM's latest processors are designed for mobile AI

Engadget

ARM isn't content to offer processor designs that are kinda-sorta ready for AI. The company has unveiled Project Trillium, a combination of hardware and software ingredients designed explicitly to speed up AI-related technologies like machine learning and neural networks. The highlights, as usual, are the chips: ARM ML promises to be far more efficient for machine learning than a regular CPU or graphics chip, with two to four times the real-world throughput. ARM OD, meanwhile, is all about object detection. It can spot "virtually unlimited" subjects in real time at 1080p and 60 frames per second, and focuses on people in particular -- on top of recognizing faces, it can detect facing, poses and gestures. The software component, ARM NN, serves as a go-between for neural network frameworks like Google's TensorFlow and ARM-based processors. It's going to be a while before you see this technology in action. ARM isn't offering previews until April, with wider availability in the middle of 2018. And remember, ARM doesn't actually design finished chips. It's up to Qualcomm, Samsung and other companies to translate these formulas into real products. The aim, however, is clear: ARM wants more devices that can handle AI tasks locally, rather than depending on a cloud-based helper like Alexa, Google Assistant or Siri. The company also expects Project Trillium to expand beyond mobile devices to include home theater, smart speakers and other categories where AI might come in handy.