Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


Alt-right accuses Amazon's Alexa of liberal political bias

Daily Mail

Smart assistants are designed to tackle a whole host of everyday tasks, but some users are unhappy that this seems to include taking a stand on political issues. Amazon's Alexa has come under fire on social media thanks to the AI-powered speaker's thoughts on a number of hot button topics. Some have branded Alexa a'social justice warrior' because of her responses to questions on subjects ranging from feminism to the Black Lives Matter movement. Smart assistants are designed to tackle a whole host of everyday tasks but some users are unhappy that this seems to include taking a stand on political issues. Amazon's Alexa has come under fire thanks to the AI powered speaker's thoughts on a number of hot button topics The response has been particularly vociferous among the alt-right community on social media.


China unveils Minority Report-style AI security system

Daily Mail

A smart surveillance system that can identify criminals among a database of 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets. Known as'Dragonfly Eye', it has already been used in Shanghai to track down hundreds of wanted criminals, reports suggest. A smart surveillance system (pictured) that can scan 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system has been helping Shanghai's police force track down criminals in a city with more than 24 million inhabitants.


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Daily Mail

A report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances. It says that requiring humans to remain in control of critical functions during combat, including the selection of targets, saves lives and ensures that fighters comply with international law. 'Machines have long served as instruments of war, but historically humans have directed how they are used,' said Bonnie Docherty, senior arms division researcher at Human Rights Watch, in a statement. 'Now there is a real threat that humans would relinquish their control and delegate life-and-death decisions to machines.' Some have argued in favour of robots on the battlefield, saying their use could save lives.


Stephen Hawking warns that robots could replace humans

Daily Mail

A report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances. It says that requiring humans to remain in control of critical functions during combat, including the selection of targets, saves lives and ensures that fighters comply with international law. 'Machines have long served as instruments of war, but historically humans have directed how they are used,' said Bonnie Docherty, senior arms division researcher at Human Rights Watch, in a statement. 'Now there is a real threat that humans would relinquish their control and delegate life-and-death decisions to machines.' Some have argued in favor of robots on the battlefield, saying their use could save lives.


New iPhone brings face recognition (and fears) to masses

Daily Mail

Apple will let you unlock the iPhone X with your face - a move likely to bring facial recognition to the masses. But along with the roll out of the technology, are concerns over how it could be used. Despite Apple's safeguards, privacy activists fear the widespread use of facial recognition would'normalise' the technology. This could open the door to broader use by law enforcement, marketers or others of a largely unregulated tool, creating a'surveillance technology that is abused'. Facial recognition could open the door to broader use by law enforcement, marketers or others of a largely unregulated tool, creating a'surveillance technology that is abused', experts have warned.


Stanford professor says face-reading AI will detect IQ

Daily Mail

Stanford researcher Dr Michal Kosinski went viral last week after publishing research (pictured) suggesting AI can tell whether someone is straight or gay based on photos. Stanford researcher Dr Michal Kosinki claims he is working on AI software that can identify political beliefs, with preliminary results proving positive. Dr Kosinki claims he is now working on AI software that can identify political beliefs, with preliminary results proving positive. Dr Kosinki claims he is now working on AI software that can identify political beliefs, with preliminary results proving positive.


AIs that learn from photos become sexist

Daily Mail

In the fourth example, the person pictured is labeled'woman' even though it is clearly a man because of sexist biases in the set that associate kitchens with women Researchers tested two of the largest collections of photos used to train image recognition AIs and discovered that sexism was rampant. However, they AIs associated men with stereotypically masculine activities like sports, hunting, and coaching, as well as objects sch as sporting equipment. 'For example, the activity cooking is over 33 percent more likely to involve females than males in a training set, and a trained model further amplifies the disparity to 68 percent at test time,' reads the paper, titled'Men Also Like Shopping,' which published as part of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods on Natural Language Processing. A user shared a photo depicting another scenario in which technology failed to detect darker skin, writing'reminds me of this failed beta test Princeton University conducted a word associate task with the algorithm GloVe, an unsupervised AI that uses online text to understand human language.


Video shows soap dispenser only responding to white skin

Daily Mail

Then, a darker skinned man waves his hand under the dispenser in various directions for ten seconds, with soap never being released. They send out invisible light from an infrared LED bulb and work when a hand reflects light back to the sensor. Then, a darker skinned man waves his hand under the dispenser in various directions for over ten seconds, with soap never being released. Essentially, the soap dispenser sends out invisible light from an infrared LED bulb and works when a hand reflects light back to the sensor.


FaceApp removes 'Ethnicity Filters' after racism storm

Daily Mail

When asked to make his picture'hot' the app lightened his skin and changed the shape of his nose The app's creators claim it will'transform your face using Artificial Intelligence', allowing selfie-takers to transform their photos Earlier this year people accused the popular photo editing app Meitu of being racist. Earlier this year people accused the popular photo editing app Meitu of giving users'yellow face'. Earlier this year people accused the popular photo editing app Meitu of giving users'yellow face'. Twitter user Vaughan posted a picture of Kanye West with a filter applied, along with the caption: 'So Meitu's pretty racist'


Microsoft's Zo chatbot calls the Qu'ran 'violent'

Daily Mail

During a recent chat, Zo referred to the Qur'an as'very violent', despite the fact that it has been programmed to avoid discussing politics and religion Zo is a chatbot that allows users to converse with a mechanical millennial over the messaging app Kik or through Facebook Messenger. But within hours of it going live, Twitter users took advantage of flaws in Tay's algorithm that meant the AI chatbot responded to certain questions with racist answers. Within hours of Tay going live, Twitter users took advantage of flaws in Tay's algorithm that meant the AI chatbot responded to certain questions with racist answers. But within hours of it going live, Twitter users took advantage of flaws in Tay's algorithm that meant the AI chatbot responded to certain questions with racist answers.