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Ray Massey says driverless car technology not yet ready

Daily Mail

The most dangerous part of any car, say the experts, 'is the nut behind the steering wheel'. Human error is to blame for most accidents, so remove that'nut' and let the car drive itself and many lives will be saved, runs the argument now pushed by ministers, manufacturers and supporters of what is known as'autonomous driving'. And it certainly seems as if it's full speed ahead for the driverless car. The Prime Minister Theresa May and Chancellor Philip Hammond yesterday confirmed plans -- widely trailed ahead of the Budget tomorrow -- to invest £900 million to deliver'fully driverless cars' by 2021. But is the Government right to be putting its foot on the accelerator?


Volvo to supply Uber with up to 24,000 self-driving cars

Daily Mail

Uber plans to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, marking the transition of the U.S. firm from an app used to summon a taxi to the owner and operator of a fleet of cars. The non-binding framework deal could offer San Francisco-based Uber a way to overcome setbacks at its autonomous driving division in Silicon Valley's race to perfect self-driving systems. Combining Volvo's cars with Uber's self-driving system builds on their nearly three-year relationship and comes as Uber's autonomous driving unit has been hit by a lawsuit over trade secrets and the departure of top talent. Uber plans to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, marking the transition of the U.S. firm from an app used to summon a taxi to the owner and operator of a fleet of cars. Automakers, ride-hailing firms and tech startups have been forging loose alliances in an effort to advance self-driving technology and claim a piece of what is expected to be a multi-billion-dollar business.


Jaguar Land Rover tests first driverless vehicle on public roads

Daily Mail

The race to conquer the driverless car market has stepped up a gear, with the first ever tests of an autonomous vehicle built in Britain on the country's public roads. Jaguar Land Rover is leading the pack with its'major landmark' trial, which aims to help vehicles react in a similar way to people. The pilot project is part of a government-backed bid to encourage more widespread use of automated cars by 2020. The race to conquer the driverless car market has stepped up a gear, with the first ever tests of an autonomous vehicle built in Britain on the country's public roads. The UK Autodrive project is the UK's largest trial of connected and autonomous vehicle technology.


California may limit liability of self-driving carmakers

Daily Mail

California regulators are embracing a General Motors recommendation that would help makers of self-driving cars avoid paying for accidents and other trouble, raising concerns that the proposal will put an unfair burden on vehicle owners. If adopted, the regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications. That could open a loophole for automakers to skirt responsibility for accidents, injuries and deaths caused by defective autonomous vehicles, said Armand Feliciano, vice president for the Association of California Insurance Companies. The regulations drafted by the California DMV would protect carmakers from lawsuits in cases where their self driving vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications. The regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications.


Hoverbikes-robotic-trucks-tested-British-Army.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

This futuristic footage shows driverless 4x4s being directed by unseen British soldiers using games console-style controllers in a world first. The Ministry of Defence yesterday announced it has worked with the US to trial an improved method of transporting food, fuel and ammunition to the front line. Over the course of a week, 'hoverbikes' and robotic trucks were tested in Michigan for the first time ever. It is hoped that remote control of vehicles will limit risks to soldiers by making'autonomous resupply' the norm. Footage from an exercise three years in the making shows a robotic convoy of trucks race across the vast landscape led by the six-tonne British Army MAN SV.


Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper

Daily Mail

Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy'smart' cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior. The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and'give an extra set of eyes' to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment. 'We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs,' said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a'dashcam on steroids.' The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret'profiling' and misuse of data. US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.


Driverless-cars-real-risk-hacked.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

Driverless cars face a'real risk' of being hacked en masse when they are introduced to Britain, an expert has warned. The connected nature of these vehicles could make them a'target' for hackers, according to evidence submitted to Parliament. Matthew Channon, an insurance expert on driverless cars from Exeter University, has written to MPs to warn of the danger of road accidents. The connected nature of these vehicles could make them a'target' for hackers, according to evidence submitted to Parliament (stock image) Technology experts agree that'connected and autonomous vehicles' without drivers are at risk, following two high-profile US hacks of cars. There are concerns terrorists could fool the automated cars into detecting obstacles which are not there and remotely slam on their brakes.


Waymo launching driverless ride-hailing service in Phoenix

Daily Mail

Alphabet Inc's Waymo self-driving unit is launching a ride-hailing service for the general public with no human driver behind the steering wheel. And, the firm has been testing such fully self-driving cars on public roads in Arizona, Chief Executive John Krafcik said on Tuesday. The announcement by Krafcik at the Web Summit technology conference in Lisbon is a major advance in the roll-out of fully autonomous vehicles. The firm recently unveiled a self-driving minivan that it hopes could revolutionize the way we travel. It showed off the technology at the closely-guarded'fake town' dubbed The Castle, 120 miles southeast of San Francisco While self-driving car companies test their vehicles in public, they routinely have a human in the driver's seat ready to take over if the technology fails.


Lockheed Martin to build giant US Navy robosub

Daily Mail

It could be the biggest robot craft ever made. Lockheed Martin has won a lucrative $43.2 million US Navy contract to built a radical new giant submarine - without a human on board. Called Orca, the Navy hopes to use up to nine of the giant submarines on secret mission. They will be able to stay underwater for months at a time, communicating remotely from enemy waters. Called Orca, the Navy hopes to use up to nine of the giant submarines on secret mission.


Self-driving cars set to transform lives of elderly

Daily Mail

The lives of elderly and the disabled will be transformed by self-driving cars, the Transport Secretary claimed today. The first autonomous cars are expected to be on Britain's roads by 2021. In a speech in London, Chris Grayling promoted the benefits of this new mode of transport to the economy and to society. The government has estimated that driverless cars could be worth £28 billion to the economy by 2035. The first autonomous cars are expected to be on Britain's roads by 2021 and increase mobility for nearly a third of the population It has also been claimed automated cars will make the roads safer, with 85 per cent of accidents last year caused by human error.