Daily Mail


Amazon's 'collaborative' robots offer peek into the future as autonomous machines work with humans

Daily Mail

Hundreds of orange robots zoom and whiz back and forth like miniature bumper cars -- but instead of colliding, they're following a carefully plotted path to transport thousands of items ordered from online giant Amazon. A young woman fitted out in a red safety vest, with pouches full of sensors and radio transmitters on her belt and a tablet in hand, moves through their complicated choreography. This robot ballet takes place at the new Amazon order fulfillment center that opened on Staten Island in New York in September. In an 80,000 square-meter (855,000 square-foot) space filled with the whirring sounds of machinery, the Seattle-based e-commerce titan has deployed some of the most advanced instruments in the rapidly growing field of robots capable of collaborating with humans. The high-tech vest, worn at Amazon warehouses since last year, is key to the whole operation -- it allows 21-year-old Deasahni Bernard to safely enter the robot area, to pick up an object that has fallen off its automated host, for example, or check if a battery needs replacing.


Facebook set to take on Amazon and Apple by building AI assistant with 'common sense'

Daily Mail

Facebook is serious about joining the AI assistant race. The social media giant has been expanding its effort to create its own artificial intelligence chips, Yann Lecun, Facebook's chief AI scientist, told the Financial Times. Facebook's hope is that its AI chips could one day power a voice assistant with the'common sense' to carry out a full conversation with humans and even rival voice assistants created by the likes of Amazon and Apple. Facebook is serious about joining the AI assistant race. The social media giant has been expanding its effort to create its own artificial intelligence chips, Facebook's AI lead said'In terms of new uses, one thing Facebook would be interested in is offering smart digital assistants - something that has a level of common sense,' Lecun told the FT.


Elon Musk says he's 'certain' self-driving Teslas will be ready by the end of this year

Daily Mail

Self-driving Tesla vehicles could be ready to hit the road sooner than expected. Billionaire tech mogul Elon Musk said he's'certain' the technology needed for self-driving Teslas will be ready by the end of this year. However, he cautioned that it take a while longer before humans will be able to safely fall asleep behind the wheel while their Tesla zooms down the highway. A fully self-driving Tesla could soon be ready to hit the road. Tech mogul Elon Musk said he's'certain' the tech needed for self-driving Teslas will be ready by the end of this year'I think we will be feature complete - full self-driving - this year,' Musk said during a podcast interview on Tuesday.


The optical illusion that 'breaks' your brain for 15 milliseconds

Daily Mail

An incredible optical illusion that'breaks your brain' for 15-milliseconds and causes you to see a circular shape spin has been created by scientists. The geometric pattern, a variation of the Pinna-Brelstaff illusion made up diamond-like shapes, turns clockwise or anti-clockwise, depending on which way you move your head. The small, thick dashes appear to turn clockwise if you move your head towards the image, or anti-clockwise if you pull your head away from it. The reason this happens is due to a communication delay between the regions of your brain that process vision and movement. Scientists have cracked why an optical illusion'breaks your brain' for 15-milliseconds causing you to see a circular shape turn clockwise and anti-clockwise depending on which way you move your head.


AI auto-corrects notes that are sung off key

Daily Mail

Listening to your friends butcher your favourite songs during karaoke nights could become a thing of the past, thanks to software created by scientists. Their AI system can bring your pitch closer to the original artist's, without making it sound overly robotic or artificial (stock image) Most commercial autotuning systems require the user to input a melody score, or instructions to modulate pitch by a particular pitch or scale. Sanna Wager, a PHD candidate and main author of the study at Indiana University, told New Scientist: 'When looking at how to correct the current note, we look at what the singer did over the past few seconds.' The current tool must be applied to recordings after they have been made, but the end product could used to make changes on-the-fly. Her paper, published on the pre-print repository Arxiv.org,


Scientists have discovered our brains communicate in a brand new way

Daily Mail

The human brain is capable of communicating in a way scientists previously thought was impossible. Brain cells can create an electrical field that triggers nearby neurons to pass on a message without any physical or chemical connections. Slow and mysterious waves produced by the brain, which have long been known to exist but whose function has been a long-standing mystery, are responsible. The discovery is so unusual the scientific journal that made the findings public demanded that the experiments were repeated before they were willing to publish. 'It was a jaw-dropping moment, for us and for every scientist we told about this so far, said Dominique Duran, a professor at the Case School of Engineering in Cleveland, Ohio.


Silly disguises actually DO help keep your true identity a secret

Daily Mail

Growing a moustache, liberally applying make-up and dying your hair are all effective ways of hiding your identity. Scientists have found that small, simple and deliberate alterations to a person's appearance are surprisingly effective in identity concealment. People were asked to judge whether two photographs that showed the same person and the study discovered the disguises reduced the ability to match faces by around 30 per cent. Scientists have found that small, simple and deliberate alterations to a person's appearance are surprisingly effective in identity concealment. Models were recruited for the study and given money to make their transformation as convincing as possible.


Smart TVs and Amazon Alexa gadgets can tell if you're CHEATING

Daily Mail

Amazon, Apple and Google voice assistants and smart TVs could find out if a person is cheating on their partner, a data expert has claimed. Smart gadgets, which are used by one in ten people around the UK, can harvest enough data to work out the dynamics of a relationship, they say. They have the potential to record saucy conversations and analyse location data to discover secret affairs. The virtual assistants can show when occupants are in a building, or for example, share a bedroom, by using sensor logs and smart meters. There is already ambiguity when it comes to these companies privacy policies and how they collect and use people's data.


World-class oil paintings blighted by 'art acne'

Daily Mail

Some of the world's finest oil paintings have been self-destructing, developing mysterious lumps and bumps known as'art acne'. Works by Georgia O'Keeffe and Rembrandt are among the hundreds of works blighted by the condition. For decades, art conservators have struggled to control the outbreaks, which look like grains of sand to the naked eye. But now, a team at Northwestern University in Chicago has developed an iPad software that can zoom in on the pigments closer than ever before, revealing the chemical issue at hand. In 20 seconds, the technology can scan a painting to produce a three-dimensional image of it.


Never get catfished again: Researchers develop AI that detects fake profiles on popular dating apps

Daily Mail

Scientists have developed an algorithm that can spot dating scams. A team of researchers trained AI software to'think like humans' when looking for fake dating profiles. While the algorithm has only been deployed in a research setting, it could one day be used to protect users on popular dating services like Tinder and Match.com. Scientists have developed an algorithm that can spot dating scams. A team of researchers trained AI software to'think like humans' when looking for fake dating profiles Romance scams, where criminals create phony profiles to trick love-lusting victims into sending them money, are on the rise.