Daily Mail


Elon Musk claims Neuralink technology that will connect human brain with computers is 'coming soon'

Daily Mail

Elon Musk believes humans must link up with machines in order to fight the inevitable onslaught of artificial intelligence. In a recent tweet, the SpaceX and Tesla CEO said technology from his latest company, Neuralink, will be'coming soon.' Musk has yet to offer up any more details on when or how the tech will come to fruition. Neuralink has previously teased a product that would effectively connect human brains to computers using a tiny implanted chip. Elon Musk believes humans must link up with machines in order to fight the inevitable onslaught of artificial intelligence. In a recent tweet, the SpaceX and Tesla CEO said technology from his latest company, Neuralink, will be'coming soon' In a new interview, SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk said his latest company Neuralink will have the technology ready to merge human brains with machines'within the next decade' While many tech leaders push that AI will become invaluable to humanity, others argue it poses a threat to our species.


Elon Musk claims Tesla has created 'the best chip in the world' for autonomous vehicles

Daily Mail

Elon Musk has given a rare glimpse into the underpinnings of his electric car company's futuristic autonomous vehicle technology. At Tesla's first-ever Autonomy Day with investors, the firm revealed it has developed what it says is the'best chip in the world' that will allow its cars to achieve full self-driving capabilities without the need for human intervention. The new chip has allowed Tesla to make strides in bringing fully autonomous software to its fleet of vehicles, so much so that Musk predicts Tesla will have more than one million fully self-driving cars on the road by 2020. Elon Musk has given a rare glimpse into the underpinnings of his electric car company's futuristic autonomous vehicle technology. How could it be that Tesla, who has never designed a chip before, would design the best chip in the world?' Musk said on stage at the event, which was hosted at Tesla's Palo Alto, California headquarters.


Tesla will launch its first fleet of autonomous robotaxis by 2020

Daily Mail

Elon Musk said he's'very confident' that Tesla will have autonomous robo-taxis on the road as soon as next year. The billionaire tech mogul showed off a Tesla ride-sharing app at the company's Autonomy Day with investors at its Palo Alto, California headquarters on Monday. Not long after Tesla's robo-taxis are operational, Musk also predicts the firm will eliminate the steering wheel and pedals from its vehicles by 2021. Elon Musk said he's'very confident' that Tesla will have autonomous robo-taxis on the road as soon as next year. Pictured is a mock up of Tesla's ride-sharing app, shown at Autonomy Day'I feel very confident predicting autonomous robo-taxis for Tesla next year,' Musk said on stage.


FBI's use of facial recognition software is under fire AGAIN

Daily Mail

The FBI has failed to appease concerns about the use of its facial recognition technology in criminal investigations. Multiple issues were raised three years ago after a congressional watchdog urged the bureau to improve its practices in order to meet privacy and accuracy standards. The FBI - and other US law enforcement agencies - have been using the Next Generation Identification-Interstate Photo System since 2015. It uses facial recognition software to link potential suspects to crimes from a vast database of 30 million pictures, including mugshots. The report slamming the FBI for its failure to moderate the software comes as the bureau increases its use of the technology.


Google Maps street view images can be used to detect signs of inequality

Daily Mail

Spotting inequality can now be done by a computer using a pre-existing, vast and easily available database of images - Google Maps street view. More than half a million pictures from this catalogue of'on-the-ground' photos were inputted into a deep learning algorithm which unpicked signs of inequality in London. Data collection was done over 156,581 different postcodes and was then applied to Leeds, Birmingham and Manchester. Overview of the street images and outcome data used in the analysis pictured). Esra Suel and colleagues from Imperial College London used deep-learning to train a computer programme designed to detect signs of austerity.


Language detecting technology struggles with George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones

Daily Mail

Game of Thrones characters and many other fantasy novels pose an issue for technology designed to decipher languages and the written word. Quirky names, such as Daenerys and Grey Worm, don't look or resemble most names from the real world and are often not picked up by technology as they don't behave in a normal manner. The algorithms are developed and trained to detect names by studying newspaper articles. A vastly different writing style is found in non-fiction novels and makes the detection of fictional names almost impossible. Names are contextualised in stories and this also adds another layer to the thorny issue.


DHS wants to ramp up use of facial recognition at airports from just 15 to almost all in 4 years

Daily Mail

Despite concerns over facial recognition's impact on civil liberties, public agencies have continued to apply the tool liberally across the U.S. with one of the biggest deployments coming to an airport near you. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said that it plans to expand its application of facial recognition to 97 percent of all passengers departing the U.S. by 2023, according to the Verge. By comparison, facial recognition technology is deployed in just 15 airports, according to figures recorded at the end of 2018. In what is being referred to as'biometric exit,' the agency plans to use facial recognition to more thoroughly track passengers entering and leaving the country. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said that it plans to expand its application of facial recognition to 97 percent of all passengers departing the U.S. by 2023 The system functions by taking a picture of passengers before they depart and then cross-referencing the image with a database containing photos of passports and visas.


The Event Horizon Telescope could capture video of the black hole

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The world's first footage of a black hole in motion could soon be created by the scientists behind a groundbreaking image of the phenomenon released last week. Experts using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) say they will produce a video of hot gases whirling chaotically around the shadow or'accretion disk' of the black hole. The supermassive black hole sits at the centre of the galaxy Messier 87, roughly 54 million light-years from Earth. EHT is a'virtual' telescope that uses data from observatories around the world to turn the whole of the Earth into one giant detector. Researchers believe that, as more telescopes join the EHT project, they can produce more detailed images and eventually film the black hole.


A firefighting robot named Colossus helped 400 firefighters battle a blaze at Notre Dame

Daily Mail

An 1,100-pound emergency robot helped to save a piece of human history during a blaze at Paris' Notre Dame cathedral that threatened to burn the historic monument to the ground. The formidable device, dubbed Colossus, a remote-controlled drone equipped with hoses and cameras, was able to roll its way into the cathedral to help fight the fire -- which burned through the structure's old wooden roof -- from within. Colossus, which is both fire-resistant, water-proof, and capable of carrying up to 1,200 pounds not only helped to stop the fire before it completely razed the structure, but reduced the need for fire fighters to enter the church where they would be in danger from falling debris. At the time, the cathedral was only 15 to 30 minutes away from being completely burned to the ground, reports say. Weighing in at 1,100 pounds, Colossus is a firefighting robot that can be controlled remotely.


We could soon have ROBOTS cleaning our messy bedrooms

Daily Mail

A Japanese tech start-up is using deep learning to teach a pair of machines a simple job for a human, but a surprisingly tricky task for a robot - cleaning a bedroom. Though it may seem like a basic, albeit tedious, task for a human, robots find this type of job surprisingly complicated. A Japanese tech start-up is using deep learning to teach AI how to deal with disorder and chaos in a child's room. Deep learning is where algorithms, inspired by the human brain, learn from large amounts of data so they're able to perform complex tasks. Some tasks, like welding car chassis in the exact same way day after day, are easy for robots as it is a repetitive process and the machines do not suffer with boredom in the same way as disgruntled employees.