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Will we ever be able to trust driverless cars?

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When you're sitting in the driver's seat at 60mph on a rain-lashed motorway, covering your eyes would normally be a dangerous, if not downright suicidal move. Putting on a virtual reality headset, obscuring the view of the road altogether, might seem even crazier. But that's exactly what I did recently. To start with, I was looking at a computer simulation of the motorway in front of me. Then the road disappeared altogether, the car took off, and I began flying through an alien landscape.


CES 2018: Food store AI sees what you put in basket

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An artificial intelligence-based system is being developed to spot what goods shoppers pick up in convenience stores so that they can be charged without having to queue at the till.


CES 2018: Were robots more than a gimmick at the tech show?

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If you've ever wanted a robot to do the vacuuming, then the CES tech show has something for you. The Aeolus robot is designed to perform a range of household tasks - including mopping floors, rearranging furniture and putting away dishes. However, like many of the bots showcased in Las Vegas this year, the pressure sometimes got to it. "Aeolus has had enough," tweeted Signe Brewster, a writer at tech site Wirecutter, after observing the bot stall inexplicably during a demo. Aeolus has had ENOUGH pic.twitter.com/GxptFULhiO


CES 2018: Omron's ping pong robot keeps ball in play

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Japanese electronics firm Omron is showing off a ping pong-playing robot that uses artificial intelligence to adapt its gameplay to each human opponent.


CES 2018: Intel's swarm of drones lights up Vegas night sky

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The dancing quadcopters are intended to show how swarms of the flying machines can be deployed without crashing into each other.


CES 2018: Sony's Aibo robo-dog shows off AI smarts

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And as the firm's chief executive Kaz Hirai explained to the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones, it highlights its expertise at marrying together hardware and artificial intelligence.


CES 2018: Amazon Alexa v Google Assistant fight gets fierce

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If victory belongs to whoever's virtual assistant can interact with the most unlikely range of household appliances, then Amazon has already won. The firm's voice-activated digital helper has been added to a bathroom mirror that can - via cloud service Kohler Konnect - pass commands to smart kitchen taps, a shower system and even a smart toilet. "That means'Alexa, ask Kohler to flush my toilet' is something you might end up saying in the near future," mused Blair Hanley Frank at news site Venturebeat. Who needs a copy of Reader's Digest when Alexa is free for a chat, instead? In all seriousness, the battle to be your smart home's virtual butler is hotly contested and a huge range of gadgets on show at the latest CES tech show in Las Vegas now boast ways for users to interact with them via assistants including Alexa, Google Assistant, Siri and others.


CES 2018: Zano the zombie drone whirs back to life

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A group of developers are attempting to revive the Zano drone - one of Kickstarter's most notorious failures. The handheld quadcopter raised £2.3m from more than 12,000 backers on the crowdfunding platform before the project imploded in 2015. The resulting scandal prompted a probe that found fault with all involved. The Zano Camera project is one of several initiatives on show at the CES expo that make use of seized assets from failed crowdfunding campaigns. The person leading the effort is Vernon Kerswell, chief executive of Extreme Fliers, a London-based micro drone manufacturer.


CES 2018: A clunky chat with Sophia the robot

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Sophia the robot is a celebrity in its own right. It has been on chat shows, given speeches and was even made a citizen of the UAE. Before I "met" Sophia, I was given a sheet of guidelines by the company behind it, Hanson Robotics. Don't talk to the robot about sex, religion or politics, it said. Ask direct questions and remember it is not a fortune teller - it can't tell you whether you'll be rich or find love.


Could these apps help you lose weight for good this year?

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January is a peak time for downloading health and fitness apps and putting those Christmas present fitness trackers to work. But do they actually help you stay motivated? After the Christmas self-indulgence comes the inevitable New Year's resolution to get fit, lose weight, and eat more healthily. But while 65% of us make resolutions, only 12% successfully keep to them, polling firm ComRes finds. When Sarah, 34, a law professor from Australia, wanted to lose weight last year, she took the unusual approach of placing bets that she would achieve her exercise goals.