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Newspaper headlines: Budget boost for driverless cars and NHS

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The Sunday Telegraph reports that Chancellor Philip Hammond will announce a pay rise for nurses after "bowing to pressure" from Conservative MPs and cabinet colleagues. The Sunday Times also leads on the Budget, with a picture of what could be a playful Mr Hammond apparently deep in thought and scratching his head. In an interview with the paper, he says he will confirm plans to build 300,000 new homes every year - equivalent to a city the size of Leeds. He is quoted as saying "he will do whatever it takes to get builders building". "Driverless cars by 2021" is the Sunday Express's front page headline.


Budget 2017: Philip Hammond to announce boost for driverless cars

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Wednesday's Budget will include plans to make the UK the best place to manufacture and road-test driverless cars, the chancellor has said. Writing in the Sun newspaper, Mr Hammond said investment in "exciting new technologies", including in driverless cars, will be announced. This will "prepare the ground" for the cars to be on UK roads by 2021, he said. Mr Hammond said the "inventors dream" will soon become a reality. The technology that allows cars to become more autonomous has been increasing in recent years, with all the main manufacturers now offering some element of driverless technology, including self-parking features and cruise control on motorways.




When Lady Chatterley joined Tinder

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When the passionate heroine of DH Lawrence's infamous 1928 novel Lady Chatterley's Lover was looking for romance, she turned to her gamekeeper. Now, she's joined dating app Tinder - with the help of artist Libby Heaney. "There's lots of good fish in the sea... maybe," Lawrence wrote in Lady Chatterley's Lover. "But the vast masses seem to be mackerel or herring, and if you're not mackerel or herring yourself you are likely to find very few good fish in the sea." If only Lady Chatterley, in her search for the perfect catch, had been on Tinder.


Gaydar founder Henry Badenhorst dies in South Africa

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You will be forever in our hearts. The founder of groundbreaking dating site Gaydar has died in his native South Africa. Henry Badenhorst, 51, died after falling from a tower block on Saturday, news website Buzzfeed reported. He died a decade after his co-founder and former partner Gary Frisch fell to his death in London. The two created Gaydar, which became the world's largest dating site for gay and bisexual men, in 1999 when a friend said he was too busy to find a partner.


Do welfare states boost economic growth, or stunt it?

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Women in politics are sometimes accused of consciously exploiting their femininity to get ahead in a male-dominated world. Frances Perkins did that, but in an unusual way: she tried to remind men of their mothers. She dressed in a plain, three-cornered hat, and she refined the way she acted, based on careful observation of what seemed to be most effective in persuading men to accept her ideas. Perhaps it's no coincidence that those ideas could reasonably be described as maternal or parental. Any parent wants to shield their children from serious harm, and Perkins believed governments should do the same for their citizens.


Can a chatbot help you find love?

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I've been nervously chatting to Lara on the dating platform Match.com for two minutes. She's flattered me about my age ("so young!") and she says she's going to take care of me. I like her already - but Lara is not real. She - or rather, it - is a chatbot, an artificially intelligent computer program developed to communicate with people online. The bot was launched in France in 2016 and then rolled out in the UK in April 2017, to help potential clients get started in their search for love by setting up their Match profile for them.


Why George Orwell is returning to the BBC

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The BBC headquarters in London is getting a new resident: he's tall, bronze and likes a smoke. From Tuesday a statue of novelist George Orwell is to adorn the exterior of New Broadcasting House, a few minutes from where Orwell worked as a radio producer in World War Two. But what was the author of Nineteen Eighty-four (Orwell's original worded title) doing in the BBC? For decades its staff have delighted in the suggestion Orwell took his notion of absolute hell from two years spent at the BBC. Near the end of Nineteen Eighty-four (1984 is now more commonly used on book covers), Winston Smith finds himself trapped in the Ministry of Love's Room 101, "many metres underground".


Drone used to search for escaped Borth lynx

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A heat-seeking drone is being used to hunt a lynx which went missing from a zoo more than a week ago. Lilleth the Eurasian lynx escaped from her enclosure at Borth Wild Animal Kingdom near Aberystwyth. The drone has a specialist night scope and thermal cameras which zoo staff searching for her hope will help pinpoint her location. So far Lilleth has evaded police helicopters, tracking devices and traps. Staff said the lynx's brother Tyrion, who also lives at the zoo, has been pining for her every night and calling out to her.