BBC News


Arizona Uber crash driver was 'watching TV'

BBC News

The "safety operator" of a self-driving Uber car was watching TV just before the vehicle was involved in a fatal collision, a police report reveals. The Uber car struck and killed pedestrian Elaine Herzberg, 49, of Tempe, Arizona in March. The police report suggests the car's driver was streaming an episode of talent show The Voice rather than monitoring the car's progress. It suggests she could face charges of vehicle manslaughter.


Psychological impact of separating children

BBC News

Paediatric and child trauma experts are sounding the alarm that separating migrant children from their parents at the US border can cause serious physical and psychological damage. As more stories emerge about children being separated from their parents at the border between Mexico and the US, doctors and scientists are warning that there could be long-term, irreversible health impacts on children if they're not reunited expediently. The head of the American Academy of Pediatrics went so far as to call the policy "child abuse" and against "everything we stand for as paediatricians". "This is completely ridiculous and I'm approaching that not as someone who's taking a position in the politics, but as a scientist," says Charles A Nelson III, a professor of paediatrics and neuroscience at Harvard Medical School. "We just know the science does not support that this is good for kids."


South Africa v England: Mike Brown says 'I'm a human, not a robot' after fan row

BBC News

England's Mike Brown said he is "not a robot" after he was involved in a verbal altercation with a fan following Saturday's defeat by South Africa. Full-back Brown and prop Joe Marler exchanged words with a supporter after the second Test in Bloemfontein. Brown, 32, told BBC Sport that when an England fan is "screaming obscenities and saying you're not trying, you are going to have a reaction". "I just told him to shut up basically," added the Harlequins player. "You can call me whatever in terms of how I've played, that's fine.


Human and computer face off in debate

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Computer manufacturers IBM have debuted their new artificial intelligence computer on stage in San Francisco.


Missing man's police drone rescue in Norfolk 'a miracle'

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The wife of a missing man who was located by a police drone up to his armpits in mud said it was "a miracle" he was found alive. A major search was launched for Peter Pugh, 75, from Brancaster, Norfolk, after he disappeared following a beach walk on Saturday at 17:10 BST. It was only when the drone was sent up that Mr Pugh was spotted in a muddy creek at Titchwell Marshes on Sunday. Police said the technology was key to their rescue operation. Mr Pugh's wife Felicity said her husband, who is still in hospital in King's Lynn with hypothermia, was "slightly bemused" by what had happened.


Call of Duty takes aim at Fortnite Battle Royale at E3

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The last-to-survive challenge has already made Fornite and Player Unknown's Battlegrounds into massive hits.


Can we trust AI if we don't know how it works?

BBC News

We're at an unprecedented point in human history where artificially intelligent machines could soon be making decisions that affect many aspects of our lives. But what if we don't know how they reached their decisions? Imagine being refused health insurance - but when you ask why, the company simply blames its risk assessment algorithm. Or if you apply for a mortgage and are refused, but the bank can't tell you exactly why. Or more seriously, if the police start arresting people on suspicion of planning a crime solely based on a predictive model informed by a data-crunching supercomputer.


World Cup 2018: Russia promises 'unprecedented' security

BBC News

At a surveillance centre in Kaliningrad, monitoring teams are keeping a close eye on the city. Sitting at their computers, staff are studying CCTV images from more than 700 security cameras. Another 1,200 cameras have been installed at Kaliningrad Stadium, where England play Belgium on 28 June. With the latest face-recognition technology, individuals are checked automatically in a police database within seconds of being caught on camera. Similar security systems are in operation in the other World Cup host cities. "In terms of anti-terrorism, this system will help locate suspicious individuals," says Sergei Evstigneev from the Kaliningrad regional government.


E3: Xbox One chief teases Halo Infinite video game

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The first look at a new Halo game has kicked off Microsoft's E3 Xbox press conference. Xbox chief Phil Spencer described it as Master Chief's "greatest adventure". But he has still confirm whether Halo Infinite marks the completion of the second trilogy in the sci-fi franchise. In addition to new games, Mr Spencer also revealed his firm had bought several indie studios - including two of the UK's leading developers - to secure exclusive content. He added that the Los Angeles games expo press event - which is still underway - would early looks at 50 games, including 18 exclusives and 15 world premieres.


Reality Check: Are dating apps behind syphilis rise?

BBC News

Syphilis might be more commonly associated with centuries past. But it's been on the rise for the past decade in England, with more cases last year than in any year since 1949. The disease was, in effect, eradicated in the UK in the mid-80s only to re-emerge around 1999. BBC Reality Check wanted to know why this ancient disease is rearing its head in England in the 21st Century. Syphilis is a bacterial infection that can be treated with antibiotics.