Agents





The Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS 2004)

AI Magazine

The Sixth International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS) was held in Porto, Portugal; previous venues were in Spain, France, and the United Kingdom. Since its inception in 1999, ICEIS has grown steadily, and is now one of the largest international conferences in the area of information systems. In 2004, more than 600 papers were submitted to the conference and its ten satellite workshops. One of the interesting features of this conference is the high number of invited speakers. In 2004, eighteen keynote speakers were featured at ICEIS and its workshops.


The Seventeenth Canadian Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AI'2004)

AI Magazine

AI'2004 was held at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario from May 17 to May 19, 2004. The conference was held jointly with the Computer and Robot Vision and Graphics Interface conferences. The three conferences attracted more than 200 attendees. Three workshops and a graduate symposium were held in conjunction with the technical sessions. Three preconference workshops were affiliated with AI'2004: The Third Business Agents and the Semantic Web workshop, organized by Harold Boley, Scott Buffett, Bruce Spencer (National Research Council), Ali Ghorbani (University of New Brunswick), and Said Tabet (Macgregor Inc.); the First Agent Meets Robot workshop, organized by Hamada Ghenniwa, (University of Western Ontario), Weiming Shen (National Research Council) and Mohamed Kamel (University of Waterloo); and the First Causality and Causal Discovery workshop, organized by Kamran Karimi (University of Regina).


Introduction to This Special Issue

AI Magazine

Developing agents that could perceive the world, reason about what they perceive in relation to their own goals and acts, has been the Holy Grail of AI. Early attempts at such holistic intelligence (for example, SRI International's AI researchers turned their attention to component technologies for structuring a single agent, such as planning, knowledge representation, diagnosis, and learning. Although most of AI research was focused on single-agent issues, a small number of AI researchers gathered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Endicott House in 1980 for the First Workshop on Distributed AI. The main scientific goal of distributed AI (DAI) is to understand the principles underlying the behavior of multiple entities in the world, called agents and their interactions. The discipline is concerned with how agent interactions produce overall multiagent system (MAS) behavior.


The Fourth International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context

AI Magazine

The Fourth International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context (CONTEXT-03) took place at the Stanford University Center for the Study of Language and Information in Stanford, California, on 23 to 25 June 2003. Like the previous conferences, CONTEXT-03 fulfilled its aim of bringing together representatives of many different research areas, spanning the whole range of the cognitive and information sciences, and with interests ranging from the use of context in specific, commercial applications to highly general philosophical, psychological, and logical theories. The conference chair was Fausto Giunchiglia, University of Trento. The program chairs were Patrick Blackburn, INRIA Lorraine; Chiara Ghidini, the Centre for Scientific and Technological Research in Trento; and Roy Turner, University of Maine. There were 77 submissions, from which 31 papers and 14 posters were selected. One of the aims of the CONTEXT conferences is to bring together representatives of ...


The 2002 Trading Agent Competition

AI Magazine

This article summarizes 16 agent strategies that were designed for the 2002 Trading Agent Competition. Agent architects use numerous general-purpose AI techniques, including machine learning, planning, partially observable Markov decision processes, Monte Carlo simulations, and multiagent systems. Ultimately, the most successful agents were primarily heuristic based and domain specific. It would be quite a daunting task to manually monitor prices and make bidding decisions at all web sites currently offering the camera--especially if accessories such as a flash and a tripod are sometimes bundled with the camera and sometimes auctioned separately. However, for the next generation of trading agents, autonomous bidding in simultaneous auctions will be a routine task.


Strategic Design of Mobile Agents

AI Magazine

Much of the economic value of electronic commerce comes from the automation of interactions between businesses and individuals. Game theory is a useful set of tools that can be used by designers of electronic-commerce applications in analyzing and engineering of automated agents and communication protocols. The central theoretical concept used in game theory is the Nash equilibrium. In this article, I show how the outcomes supported by a Nash equilibrium can positively be enlarged using automated negotiations. In addition, despite the sharp falls in the share prices of many "dotcoms" since early 2000, electronic commerce is still likely to have a major and lasting effect on most forms of economic activities.


Science and Engineering in Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

AI Magazine

As a field, knowledge representation has often been accused of being off in a theoretical noman's land, removed from, and largely unrelated to, the central issues in AI. This article argues that recent trends in KR instead demonstrate the benefits of the interplay between science and engineering, a lesson from which all AI could benefit. This article grew out of a survey talk on the Third International Conference on Knowledge Representation and Reasoning (KR '92) (Nebel, Rich, and Swartout 1992) that I presented at the Thirteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI '93). This article is an edited version of a talk surveying that conference, which I presented at the Thirteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI '93). Although nominally a conference overview, the article attempts to summarize the state of the conference and the field with respect to the intertwined goals of science and engineering.