Results


Understanding natural language

Classics

This paper describes a computer system for understanding English. It is based on the belief that in modeling language understanding, we must deal in an integrated way with all of the aspects of language--syntax, semantics, and inference. It enters into a dialog with a person, responding to English sentences with actions and English replies, asking for clarification when its heuristic programs cannot understand a sentence through the use of syntactic, semantic, contextual, and physical knowledge. By developing special procedural representations for syntax, semantics, and inference, we gain flexibility and power.


Semantic categories of nominals for conceptual dependency analysis of natural language

Classics

Abstract: A system for the semantic categorization of conceptual objects (nominals) is provided. The system is intended to aid computer understanding of natural language. Specific implementations for noun-pairs and prepositional phrases are offered.


Artificial Intelligence: A General Survey (The Lighthill Report)

Classics

In forming such a view the Council has available to it a great deal of specialist information through its structure of Boards and Committees-- particularly from the Engineering Board and its Computing Science Committee and from the Science Board and its Biological Sciences Committee. To supplement the important mass of specialist and detailed information available to the Science Research Council, its Chairman decided to commission an independent report by someone outside the Al eld but with substantial general experience of research work in multidisciplinary elds including elds with mathematical, engineering and biological aspects. Such a personal view of the subject might be helpful to other lay persons such as Council members in the process of preparing to study specialist reports and recommendations and working towards detailed policy formation and decision taking. In scientic applications, there is a similar look beyond conventional data processing to the problems involved in large-scale data banking and retrieval, The vast eld of chemical compounds is one which has lent itself to ingenious and eective programs for data storage and retrieval and for the inference of chemical structure from mass-spec- trometry and other data.


Question-answering in English

Classics

To illustrate how this may be done in very simple cases we give rules which translate certain declarative sentences and questions involving the quantifiers'some', 'every', 'any', and'no' into a modified first-order predicate calculus, and answer the questions by comparing their translated forms with those of the declaratives. John kissed Mary (1) Did John kiss Mary? (5) We begin by describing a method for translating a modest subset of English into a slightly modified first-order predicate calculus -- modified just enough to provide a representation for questions. We would like to have rules which transcribe such declarative sentences into predicate calculus formulae, such as VxMxj (7') 3x-- The matrix will be preceded by a string of quantifiers and negations -- and possibly a question mark; we have found that the transcription rules which appear below produce unique and acceptable orderings of these symbols from unambiguous sentences of the specified type.


Automatic translation of languages since 1960: A linguist's view

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Language was considered just a "bunch of words" and the primary task for early machine translation (MT) was to build machines large enough to hold all the words necessary in the translation process. These means included the printing out of the several possible solutions of ambiguous text segments to let the reader decide for himself the correct meaning, printing out the ambiguous source language text, and other temporary expedients. Particularly one must understand the rules under which such a complex system as human language operates and how the mechanism of this operation can be simulated by automatic means, i.e., without any human intervention at all. The second problem, the simulation of human language behavior by automatic means, is almost impossible to achieve, since language is an open and dynamic system in constant change and because the operation of the system is not yet completely understood.



Transition Network Grammars for Natural Language Analysis

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Full text available for a fee."The use of augmented transition network grammars for the analysis of natural language sentences is described. Structure-building actions associated with the arcs of the grammar network allow for the reordering, restructuring, and copying of constituents necessary to produce deep-structure representations of the type normally obtained from a transformational analysis, and conditions on the arcs allow for a powerful selectivity which can rule out meaningless analyses and take advantage of semantic information to guide the parsing. The advantages of this model for natural language analysis are discussed in detail and illustrated by examples. An implementation of an experimental parsing system for transition network grammars is briefly described."Communications of the ACM, Vol. 13, No. 10, October, 1970, pp. 591-606 (reprinted in RNLP: 71-88)


Natural language question-answering systems: 1969

Classics

In the meantime, Chomsky (1965) devised a paradigm for linguistic analysis that includes syntactic, semantic, and phonological components to account for the generation of natural language statements. This theory can be interpreted to imply that the meaning of a sentence can be represented as a semantically interpreted deep structure--i.e, From computer science's preoccupation with formal programming languages and compilers, there emerged another paradigm. The adoption and combination of these two new paradigms have resulted in a vigorous new generation of language processing systems characterized by sophisticated linguistic and logical processing of well-defined formal data structures. These included a social-conversation machine, systems that translated from English into limited logical calculi, and programs that attempted to answer questions from English text.


User's guide to QA3

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A question-answering system. Tech. Note 15, AI Group, Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, Calif.