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Lego-Like Brain Balls Could Build a Living Replica of Your Noggin

WIRED

Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences. Most important, the Yale team saw that, in keeping with proper brain development, inhibitory interneurons from the MGE organoid migrated into the cortical organoid mass and began to integrate themselves into the neural networks there, exactly as they do in the developing fetal brain. But they all found that the fused organoids yielded neural networks with a lifelike mix of excitatory neurons, inhibitory neurons and supporting cells, and that they could be developed more reliably than the older types of mini-brain organoids. Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.


Artificial Intelligence Is Likely to Make a Career in Finance, Medicine or Law a Lot Less Lucrative

#artificialintelligence

Growing up, there's a good chance you heard the mantra "go to a good school, get a good job, and make lots of money." Perhaps you were encouraged to get a professional degree to land a high paying job like a doctor, dentist, lawyer or something similar. This also seems like great advice, considering a professional degree holder typically earns more than $2 million more in their lifetimes than the average college graduate. Because lawyers tend to pay excellent attention to detail, and are highly versed in logic, a good alternative field would be programming.


Groundbreaking drug could treat childhood Alzheimer's

Daily Mail

The disease, Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), causes cholesterol build up in the neurons, leading to enlarged organs, lung damage, muscle stiffness, seizures, dementia and difficulty speaking. The test, which is called the NPC Neurological Severity Score, helps assess eye movement, gait, speech, swallowing, fine motor skills, cognition, hearing, memory and presence and severity of seizures. The historical data showed patients' scores increased - meaning the disease worsened - an average of 2.9 points per year. The progressive, fatal condition, officially known as Niemann-Pick disease type C, causes enlarged organs, lung damage, muscle stiffness, dementia and difficulty speaking.