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Artificial Intellgence -- Application in Life Sciences and Beyond. The Upper Rhine Artificial Intelligence Symposium UR-AI 2021

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The TriRhenaTech alliance presents the accepted papers of the 'Upper-Rhine Artificial Intelligence Symposium' held on October 27th 2021 in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Topics of the conference are applications of Artificial Intellgence in life sciences, intelligent systems, industry 4.0, mobility and others. The TriRhenaTech alliance is a network of universities in the Upper-Rhine Trinational Metropolitan Region comprising of the German universities of applied sciences in Furtwangen, Kaiserslautern, Karlsruhe, Offenburg and Trier, the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University Loerrach, the French university network Alsace Tech (comprised of 14 'grandes \'ecoles' in the fields of engineering, architecture and management) and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. The alliance's common goal is to reinforce the transfer of knowledge, research, and technology, as well as the cross-border mobility of students.


Compact edge AI box runs Ubuntu Server on 24-core Arm SoC with choice of NPUs

#artificialintelligence

Like most embedded system manufacturers, Vecow focuses on Intel-based products. Yet earlier this year the Taiwan-based company released an i.MX6 UL powered VIG-120 IoT gateway for electric vehicles and it has now unveiled a similarly compact and Arm/Linux-driven VAC-1000 series. The rugged, 170 x 118 x 40mm system features a Foxconn FXN3102 SoC with 24 up to 1GHz Cortex-A53 cores and offers a choice of GTI Lightspeeur 2801S (VAC-1000) and Hailo-8 (VAC-1100) NPUs. Although Vecow lists no additional FXN3102 features, the headless SynQuacer SC2A11 features a 4MB L3 equipped cache coherent interconnect. Up to 64 SC2A11 chips cab be combined for a server with 1,536 cores running in parallel.


How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.