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Red Hat Linux is coming to your Vette and Caddy Escalade

ZDNet

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, aka sjvn, has been writing about technology and the business of technology since CP/M-80 was the cutting edge, PC operating system; 300bps was a fast Internet connection; WordStar was the state of the art word processor; and we liked it. Linux has long played a role in cars. Some companies, such as Tesla, run their own homebrew Linux distros. Audi, Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai, and Toyota all rely on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). AGL is a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for connected cars with over 140 members.


The Best Automotive News in April - EE Times Asia

#artificialintelligence

So much happened in the auto industry this month it can't fit in one column; I whittled it down to the things that interested me. There is a lot of variety by topic -- from Auto Shanghai to a new operating system to an interesting DARPA story to the European Union proposal for AI use regulation. These ten stories are summarized in the following table. Auto Shanghai Auto Shanghai is among the world's largest auto shows and is the first auto show to be held after the pandemic. The attendance is expected to reach about 1 million people and around 1,000 exhibitors.


How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

#artificialintelligence

The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


Apple iTunes could be killed off as software update rumoured to bring host of new apps

The Independent - Tech

The music management system was once seen as the future of computing: it was used to control the iPod, and was home to the iTunes Store, both of which helped to revolutionise the way people buy and listen to music. But with time it has become bloated with additional features – from watching films to managing devices like phones – and its performance has dropped. That has led to it becoming largely despised within the tech community. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


Elon Musk: $35,000 Tesla Model 3 arrives but job cuts coming as sales shift online

ZDNet

Tesla's long-awaited $35,000 Model 3 electric car is finally available to buy, just under three years after hundreds of thousands of people started placing deposits for pre-order vehicles. The standard Model 3 has a range of 220 miles and its single electric motor is capable of 0-60mph in 5.6 seconds with a top speed of 130mph. The standard interior includes heated cloth seats, manual seat and steering adjustment, basic audio, standard maps and navigation, and a center console with storage and four USB ports. Tesla has also announced a Standard Range Plus model, which has a 240-mile range with a top speed of 140mph and can do 0-60mph in 5.3 seconds. Along with the Model 3 announcement, Tesla said it will also close most of its showrooms around the world and shift sales to online only.


It's a Linux-powered car world

ZDNet

Elon Musk's new tractor trailer can handle most US shipping routes on a single charge. Linux is everywhere including your car. While some companies, like Tesla, run their own homebrew Linux distros, most rely on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). AGL is a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for connected cars with over 140 members. This Linux Foundation-based organization is a who's who of Linux-friendly car manufacturers.


Linux is under your hood

ZDNet

Elon Musk's new tractor trailer can handle most US shipping routes on a single charge. Way back in 2004, Jonathan Schwartz, then Sun's chief operating officer, suggested that cars could become software platforms the same way feature phones were. But, it's Linux, not Java, which is making the most of "smart cars". That's because Linux and open-source software are flexible enough to bring a complete software stack to any hardware, be it supercomputer, smartphone, or a car. There are other contenders, such as Blackberry's QNX and Microsoft IoT Connected Vehicles, but both have lost ground to Linux.


Ford Paves a Path From Big Automaker to Big Operating System

WIRED

In its 114-year history, Ford has been many kinds of automaker. Now the company that helped put a car (or two) in every garage wants to be something else altogether: an operating system.


Open Source Startup Mapzen Is Dead, But Mapping Is Hotter Than Ever

WIRED

For at least one startup, 2018 opened with a thud. On Tuesday, the open source mapping company Mapzen announced it would shut down at the end of the month, with its hosted APIs and support services going dark on February 1.