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What happened to Boeing flight that went down over China?

FOX News

'Special Report' All-Star Panel reacts to a federal judge declaring public transportation mask mandates unlawful. The mystery surrounding the Boeing plane crash in China last month lingers despite authorities recovering the plane's two black boxes and extensive investigations at the crash site. A Boeing 737 jet crashed into a hillside in Southern China on March 21, killing 132 people on board. China Eastern Airlines flight MU5735 was completing a domestic flight when the crash happened. The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) has led the investigation over the past month, but Wednesday reported that officials found no evidence of systematic failure aboard the plane at the time of the crash.


Space Needle utilises artificial intelligence to manage visitors

#artificialintelligence

"By understanding how people enjoy the Space Needle's observation decks, food and beverage experiences, and amenities, we can better provide both a safe and enjoyable experience," said Luis Quintero, senior operations manager at the Space Needle. "Through Veovo's crowd management solution, we can reduce and prevent overcrowding, while understanding trends over time will allow us to optimise our operations and resourcing." London Gatwick Airport will use Passenger Predictability solution to optimise security operations and improve passenger flow. The partnership will allow the airport to efficiently handle increasing passenger numbers and build back better for a more sustainable, passenger-centred travel experience. The AI-powered technology gives Gatwick real-time awareness of people's movement and experiences in the North and South terminal security areas.


Delta expanding facial recognition technology to domestic flights in Detroit

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Delta Air Lines is bringing facial recognition technology to domestic flights. Last week, the airline announced that it is launching its digital ID technology for domestic flights out of Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport. Delta previously debuted the technology in 2018 for international flights.


Tesla may build 12-seat electric VANS that zip passengers at 127 mph through an underground tunnel

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Tesla is developing its own electric van for zipping passengers through its underground'boring' tunnels. According to a report from The Mercury News, San Bernardino County Transportation Authority will work with Tesla - and its sister drilling company Boring Company - to develop a 12-seat electric van for transporting passengers through a nearly 3-mile tunnel. The vans will be used in a recently approved connector line between Rancho Cucamonga and the Ontario International Airport. Tesla may develop an electric van capable of caring passengers between a 3-mile underground tunnel connecting Rancho Cucamonga and the Ontario International Airport. in San Bernardino County. While plans originally called for specially designed cars, the $60 million project will use the vans instead to eventually carry 1,200 passengers per day or about 10 million per year according to The Mercury News.


Airlines avoid Iran and Iraq airspace

The Japan Times

PARIS – Several international airlines said Wednesday they would avoid Iranian and Iraqi airspace after Tehran fired ballistic missiles at bases housing U.S. troops in Iraq. Lufthansa and its Austrian Airlines unit nonetheless decided to maintain flights to the Iranian capital, Tehran, this week, a statement said. Iran launched more than 20 missiles at bases housing U.S. troops in the early hours, officials in Washington and Tehran said. Iran's supreme leader called the attacks a "slap in the face" after a U.S. drone strike killed Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani near Baghdad international airport last week. In Germany, Lufthansa said it had halted overflights of Iran and Iraq until further notice.


Gatwick to use facial recognition at boarding

#artificialintelligence

Gatwick has become the UK's first airport to confirm it will use facial-recognition cameras on a permanent basis for ID checks before passengers board planes. It follows a self-boarding trial carried out in partnership with EasyJet last year. The London airport said the technology should reduce queuing times but travellers would still need to carry passports. On Tuesday, a spokeswoman for Gatwick told BBC News it had taken the decision, first reported by the Telegraph newspaper, after reviewing feedback from passengers in the earlier test. "More than 90% of those interviewed said they found the technology extremely easy to use and the trial demonstrated faster boarding of the aircraft for the airline and a significant reduction in queue time for passengers," she said.


Delta to begin using facial recognition cameras at an LAX

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Delta Air Lines will implement facial recognition technology at Los Angeles International Airport from Friday, with cameras identifying passengers at a boarding gate with more to be installed after. The move has been met with controversy however, as groups such as Greenpeace call for a federal banning of the technology by law enforcement agencies. Critics say the technology could be used to violate privacy and date, as well as pointing to issues with accuracy for non-white male subjects. A spokeswoman for the coalition of groups, which also includes MoveOn and the Electronic Privacy Information Center, said the groups also oppose the use of the technology by airlines. 'There is no real oversight for how a private corporation can use our biometric information once they've collected it,' said Evan Greer, deputy director of Fight for the Future.


Facial recognition scanners are already at some US airports. Here's what to know

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Many airports hope to start using biometric scanners in lieu of passports to identify travelers. Buzz60's Tony Spitz has the details. The next time you go to the airport you might notice something different as part of the security process: A machine scanning your face to verify your identity. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domestic airports to better streamline security. But how does the process work?


Least Squares Approximation for a Distributed System

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this work we develop a distributed least squares approximation (DLSA) method, which is able to solve a large family of regression problems (e.g., linear regression, logistic regression, Cox's model) on a distributed system. By approximating the local objective function using a local quadratic form, we are able to obtain a combined estimator by taking a weighted average of local estimators. The resulting estimator is proved to be statistically as efficient as the global estimator. In the meanwhile it requires only one round of communication. We further conduct the shrinkage estimation based on the DLSA estimation by using an adaptive Lasso approach. The solution can be easily obtained by using the LARS algorithm on the master node. It is theoretically shown that the resulting estimator enjoys the oracle property and is selection consistent by using a newly designed distributed Bayesian Information Criterion (DBIC). The finite sample performance as well as the computational efficiency are further illustrated by extensive numerical study and an airline dataset. The airline dataset is 52GB in memory size. The entire methodology has been implemented by Python for a de-facto standard Spark system. By using the proposed DLSA algorithm on the Spark system, it takes 26 minutes to obtain a logistic regression estimator whereas a full likelihood algorithm takes 15 hours to reaches an inferior result.


NEC shows how facial recognition could speed up boarding at Japan's Narita airport hub

The Japan Times

NEC Corp. gave a demonstration of its facial recognition system at its headquarters in Tokyo on Friday that it says will help passengers board planes faster without having to present passports or boarding passes. Narita will be the first airport in the country to deploy the system, called OneID, ahead of an expected spike in foreign arrivals for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. In the media presentation, NEC showed how the system streamlined the boarding procedure. First, at the self check-in machine, passenger consent was obtained, then their passport was scanned and a barcode on their smartphone screen provided the flight details. A camera was used to capture their facial image during the process.