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As the world grays, Japan's aging market showcases high-tech senior care

The Japan Times

Six years ago, Atsushi Nakanishi launched Triple W with nothing but the seed of an idea and an overwhelming passion to realize it. Today, the startup is the creator and seller of DFree -- the world's first wearable device for urinary incontinence. The tiny, noninvasive device uses ultrasound to monitor the volume of urine in the user's bladder in real time. When the bladder reaches its threshold, DFree sends an alert to the user's smartphone to tell them it is time to go to the bathroom. Nakanishi credits the ground-breaking product to a eureka moment in 2013.


The Healthy States of America: Creating a Health Taxonomy with Social Media

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Since the uptake of social media, researchers have mined online discussions to track the outbreak and evolution of specific diseases or chronic conditions such as influenza or depression. To broaden the set of diseases under study, we developed a Deep Learning tool for Natural Language Processing that extracts mentions of virtually any medical condition or disease from unstructured social media text. With that tool at hand, we processed Reddit and Twitter posts, analyzed the clusters of the two resulting co-occurrence networks of conditions, and discovered that they correspond to well-defined categories of medical conditions. This resulted in the creation of the first comprehensive taxonomy of medical conditions automatically derived from online discussions. We validated the structure of our taxonomy against the official International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11), finding matches of our clusters with 20 official categories, out of 22. Based on the mentions of our taxonomy's sub-categories on Reddit posts geo-referenced in the U.S., we were then able to compute disease-specific health scores. As opposed to counts of disease mentions or counts with no knowledge of our taxonomy's structure, we found that our disease-specific health scores are causally linked with the officially reported prevalence of 18 conditions.


Learning Dynamic and Personalized Comorbidity Networks from Event Data using Deep Diffusion Processes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Comorbid diseases co-occur and progress via complex temporal patterns that vary among individuals. In electronic health records we can observe the different diseases a patient has, but can only infer the temporal relationship between each co-morbid condition. Learning such temporal patterns from event data is crucial for understanding disease pathology and predicting prognoses. To this end, we develop deep diffusion processes (DDP) to model "dynamic comorbidity networks", i.e., the temporal relationships between comorbid disease onsets expressed through a dynamic graph. A DDP comprises events modelled as a multi-dimensional point process, with an intensity function parameterized by the edges of a dynamic weighted graph. The graph structure is modulated by a neural network that maps patient history to edge weights, enabling rich temporal representations for disease trajectories. The DDP parameters decouple into clinically meaningful components, which enables serving the dual purpose of accurate risk prediction and intelligible representation of disease pathology. We illustrate these features in experiments using cancer registry data.



Rule-Based Expert Systems: The MYCIN Experiments of the Stanford Heuristic Programming Project

Classics

Artificial intelligence, or AI, is largely an experimental science—at least as much progress has been made by building and analyzing programs as by examining theoretical questions. MYCIN is one of several well-known programs that embody some intelligence and provide data on the extent to which intelligent behavior can be programmed. As with other AI programs, its development was slow and not always in a forward direction. But we feel we learned some useful lessons in the course of nearly a decade of work on MYCIN and related programs. In this book we share the results of many experiments performed in that time, and we try to paint a coherent picture of the work. The book is intended to be a critical analysis of several pieces of related research, performed by a large number of scientists. We believe that the whole field of AI will benefit from such attempts to take a detailed retrospective look at experiments, for in this way the scientific foundations of the field will gradually be defined. It is for all these reasons that we have prepared this analysis of the MYCIN experiments.

The complete book in a single file.