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FDA clarifies how it will regulate digital health, artificial intelligence - STAT

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The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidelines on how it will regulate mobile health software and products that use artificial intelligence to help doctors decide how to treat patients. The guidelines, contained in a pair of documents released Thursday morning, clarify the agency's intent to focus its oversight powers on AI decision-support products that are meant to guide treatment of serious or critical conditions, but whose rationale cannot be independently evaluated by doctors. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT Plus and enjoy your first 30 days free! STAT Plus is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.


'Money Honey' Maria Bartiromo on Trump, artificial intelligence and the future of work

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Maria Bartiromo, host of "Maria Bartiromo's Wall Street" on Fox Business Network will host at documentary on the future of artificial intelligence. On a recent Friday, Maria Bartiromo, the financial television icon, offered a visitor a tour of her new corner office in the News Corporation Building in midtown Manhattan. The office, lined with floor-to-ceiling windows, is furnished with a cognac leather sofa, chairs and a large desk. Bartiromo, who has been with Fox News and Fox Business for more than five years, extended her tenure with the networks with a multi-year deal earlier this week. By 10 a.m., she'd already logged four hours of on-camera work.


Q&A: The FDA's digital health chief on how to regulate AI products - STAT

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The Food and Drug Administration has allowed medical devices that rely on artificial intelligence algorithms onto the market, but so far, the agency has given the green light only to devices with "locked algorithms" -- those that remain the same as the product is used until they're updated by the manufacturer. Systems with algorithms that evolve and sharpen on their own, however, are already in development. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT Plus and enjoy your first 30 days free! STAT Plus is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.


The Unproven, Invasive Surveillance Technology Schools Are Using to Monitor Students

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ProPublica is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica's Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. Ariella Russcol specializes in drama at the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Queens, New York, and the senior's performance on this April afternoon didn't disappoint. While the library is normally the quietest room in the school, her ear-piercing screams sounded more like a horror movie than study hall. But they weren't enough to set off a small microphone in the ceiling that was supposed to detect aggression.


A Device to Detect 'Aggression' in Schools Often Misfires

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This story was co-published with ProPublica. Ariella Russcol specializes in drama at the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Queens, New York, and the senior's performance on this April afternoon didn't disappoint. While the library is normally the quietest room in the school, her ear-piercing screams sounded more like a horror movie than study hall. But they weren't enough to set off a small microphone in the ceiling that was supposed to detect aggression. A few days later, at the Staples Pathways Academy in Westport, Connecticut, junior Sami D'Anna inadvertently triggered the same device with a less spooky sound--a coughing fit from a lingering chest cold.


Tracking Analytics with Artificial Intelligence

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Many industry giants are running out of options with increased competition. Wall Street is pressuring such companies to outpace potential disruptors or, like Ford CEO Mark Fields, get booted. Disruptors also grow -- and get huge valuations -- quickly, making buying your way to innovation less attractive. One alternative is to adopt the tools like advanced data analytics and artificial intelligence to create better efficiencies. Businesses that do so enjoy competitive advantages, significant cost savings -- and most importantly, ensure they provide their customers with the most relevant product or service.


How to get rich quick in Silicon Valley Corey Pein

The Guardian

The most desirable career of the 21st century, with numerous advantages over other fast-growing occupations such as hospice carer and rickshaw driver, is being a billionaire. Prior to the incorporation of US Steel in 1901, the world didn't have a single billion-dollar company, much less a billion-dollar individual. Today, more people than ever are becoming billionaires – 2,000 and counting have made the great leap upward, according to the "global wealth team" at Forbes. And the US's hottest billionaire factory is located in the most hyped yet least understood swath of suburban sprawl in the world: Silicon Valley. Despite what you may have heard, hard work in your chosen trade is absolutely the stupidest way to join the billionaires club. In Silicon Valley, the world's most brilliant MBAs and IT professionals discovered a shortcut to fabulous riches. Ambitious Ivy Leaguers who once flocked to Wall Street are now packing up and heading west. The Valley's startup founders, investors, equity-holding executives and fee-taking middlemen have thrived above all. Inspired by their success, my idea was to move to Silicon Valley, pitch a startup and become obscenely rich. I left home with some homemade business cards showing my new email address, futurebillionaire@aol.com, The first thing I needed was a place to stay.


Will Wall Street's Top Regulator Stay Focused on Bank Culture?: DealBook Briefing

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When Mr. Dudley took the helm in 2009, the financial crisis had left the New York Fed's reputation as a regulator damaged. The institution had not done enough to address the severe weaknesses at the banks it oversaw, like Citigroup. Early on, Mr. Dudley commissioned a review of the New York Fed's bank supervision department and then overhauled it. But in 2012, JPMorgan Chase, also overseen by the New York Fed, suffered huge trading losses in what was known as the London Whale scandal. The New York Fed was faulted.


Automation and financial services: debunking the myths

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In an age of self-driving cars, 'robot surgery' and computers capable of trouncing human players in hugely-complex games such as Chess or Go, it seems obvious to many that the automation of Wall Street, the City of London, Frankfurt and other financial centres must be imminent.


Is Artificial Intelligence (Finally) the Technology We Need to Save the World?

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I've worked in the technology industry now for almost half my life. Frequently, I get asked why I chose to pursue a career in this space (especially when there were so few women doing so when I first jumped on board the high-tech train during the dot-com boom in San Francisco in the late 1990s). Often, I answer this question with a lovely story about attending a two-room schoolhouse in remote Prince Edward Island, the "birthplace" of Anne of Green Gables. I wax poetic about my idyllic childhood and share the eye-opening moment when I fell in love with my first gadget, a hefty portable cellular phone that my dad owned in the 1980s, the spitting image of the device Gordon Gekko flaunted in the 1987 hit flick Wall Street. However, the real answer to this question about why I chose to report on the future is far more complex than a shiny Motorola DynaTAC 8000X.