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Scientists use big data to sway elections and predict riots -- welcome to the 1960s

Nature

Ignorance of history is a badge of honour in Silicon Valley. "The only thing that matters is the future," self-driving-car engineer Anthony Levandowski told The New Yorker in 20181. Levandowski, formerly of Google, Uber and Google's autonomous-vehicle subsidiary Waymo (and recently sentenced to 18 months in prison for stealing trade secrets), is no outlier. The gospel of'disruptive innovation' depends on the abnegation of history2. 'Move fast and break things' was Facebook's motto. Another word for this is heedlessness. And here are a few more: negligence, foolishness and blindness.


Trump must make known 'deadly' changes to US drone policy: NGOs

Al Jazeera

A group of nongovernmental organisations called on the Trump administration to clarify its policy on drone use, saying they are concerned about reported changes to US rules and a lack of transparency in the decision-making process. "We are deeply concerned that the reported new policy, combined with this administration's reported dramatic increase in lethal operations in Yemen and Somalia, will add to an increase in unlawful killings and in civilian casualties," a joint statement said. The organisations include Amnesty International, the US-based Center for Constitutional Rights, Human Rights Watch, the ACLU and others. President Donald Trump signed the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act in December. The act funds the US military but also requires Trump to make known to Congress any changes to previous drone policies by March 12.



Global Race For Artificial Intelligence: Weighing Benefits And Risks – Analysis

#artificialintelligence

British science fiction writer and futurist, Arthur C. Clarke once said, "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic". Artificial Intelligence (AI) brings in a host of real-world applications which had earlier merely been a subject of science fiction novels or movies. AI empowered cars are already under rigorous testing and they are quite likely to ply on the roads soon. The social humanoid robot Sophia became a citizen of Saudi Arabia in 2017. Apple's intelligent personal assistant, Siri, can receive instructions and interact with human beings in natural language. Autonomous weapons can execute military missions on their own, identify and engage targets without any human intervention. In the words of John McCarthy, AI, is the "science and engineering of making intelligent machines, especially intelligent computer programs". As a burgeoning discipline of computer science, AI enables intelligent machines that can execute functions, similar to human abilities like speech, facial, object or gesture recognition, learning, problem solving, reasoning, perception and response.



Artificial intelligence doesn't require burdensome regulation

#artificialintelligence

One of the most important issues that Congress will face in 2018 is how and when to regulate our growing dependence on artificial intelligence (AI). During the U.S. National Governors Association summer meetings, Elon Musk urged the group to push forward with regulation "before it's too late," stati...


PROTECT -- A Deployed Game-Theoretic System for Strategic Security Allocation for the United States Coast Guard

AI Magazine

Toward that end, this article presents PROTECT, a game-theoretic system deployed by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) in the Port of Boston for scheduling its patrols. USCG has termed the deployment of PROTECT in Boston a success; PROTECT is currently being tested in the Port of New York, with the potential for nationwide deployment. PROTECT is premised on an attackerdefender Stackelberg game model and offers five key innovations. First, this system is a departure from the assumption of perfect adversary rationality noted in previous work, relying instead on a quantal response (QR) model of the adversary's behavior -- to the best of our knowledge, this is the first real-world deployment of the QR model. Second, to improve PROTECT's efficiency, we generate a compact representation of the defender's strategy space, exploiting equivalence and dominance.


Artificial intelligence doesn't require burdensome regulation

#artificialintelligence

One of the most important issues that Congress will face in 2018 is how and when to regulate our growing dependence on artificial intelligence (AI). During the U.S. National Governors Association summer meetings, Elon Musk urged the group to push forward with regulation "before it's too late," stating that AI was an "existential threat to humanity." Hyperbole aside, there are legitimate concerns about the technology and its use. But a rush to regulation could exacerbate current issues, or create new issues that we're not prepared to deal with along the way. To begin with, one of the biggest issues in the world of AI is the lack of clear definition for what the technology is -- and is not.