Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


From 0 to 1: Machine Learning, NLP & Python-Cut to the Chase

@machinelearnbot

Prerequisites: No prerequisites, knowledge of some undergraduate level mathematics would help but is not mandatory. Working knowledge of Python would be helpful if you want to run the source code that is provided. Taught by a Stanford-educated, ex-Googler and an IIT, IIM - educated ex-Flipkart lead analyst. This team has decades of practical experience in quant trading, analytics and e-commerce. The course is shy but confident: It is authoritative, drawn from decades of practical experience -but shies away from needlessly complicating stuff.


Unanth - Online Video Tutorial Courses, Online Learning & Training Marketplace

#artificialintelligence

Prerequisites: No prerequisites, knowledge of some undergraduate level mathematics would help but is not mandatory. Working knowledge of Python would be helpful if you want to run the source code that is provided. Taught by a Stanford-educated, ex-Googler and an IIT, IIM - educated ex-Flipkart lead analyst. This team has decades of practical experience in quant trading, analytics and e-commerce. The course is shy but confident: It is authoritative, drawn from decades of practical experience -but shies away from needlessly complicating stuff.


Collection of Machine Learning Interview Questions

#artificialintelligence

Here is the link to coursera course for NLP Pick the software from the The Stanford NLP (Natural Language Processing) Group and input some text to view its parse tree, named entities, part of speech tags, etc.


Collection of Machine Learning Interview Questions

#artificialintelligence

Here is the link to coursera course for NLP Pick the software from the The Stanford NLP (Natural Language Processing) Group and input some text to view its parse tree, named entities, part of speech tags, etc.


Mathematical Language Processing: Automatic Grading and Feedback for Open Response Mathematical Questions

arXiv.org Machine Learning

While computer and communication technologies have provided effective means to scale up many aspects of education, the submission and grading of assessments such as homework assignments and tests remains a weak link. In this paper, we study the problem of automatically grading the kinds of open response mathematical questions that figure prominently in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses. Our data-driven framework for mathematical language processing (MLP) leverages solution data from a large number of learners to evaluate the correctness of their solutions, assign partial-credit scores, and provide feedback to each learner on the likely locations of any errors. MLP takes inspiration from the success of natural language processing for text data and comprises three main steps. First, we convert each solution to an open response mathematical question into a series of numerical features. Second, we cluster the features from several solutions to uncover the structures of correct, partially correct, and incorrect solutions. We develop two different clustering approaches, one that leverages generic clustering algorithms and one based on Bayesian nonparametrics. Third, we automatically grade the remaining (potentially large number of) solutions based on their assigned cluster and one instructor-provided grade per cluster. As a bonus, we can track the cluster assignment of each step of a multistep solution and determine when it departs from a cluster of correct solutions, which enables us to indicate the likely locations of errors to learners. We test and validate MLP on real-world MOOC data to demonstrate how it can substantially reduce the human effort required in large-scale educational platforms.


Structured Generative Models of Natural Source Code

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We study the problem of building generative models of natural source code (NSC); that is, source code written and understood by humans. Our primary contribution is to describe a family of generative models for NSC that have three key properties: First, they incorporate both sequential and hierarchical structure. Second, we learn a distributed representation of source code elements. Finally, they integrate closely with a compiler, which allows leveraging compiler logic and abstractions when building structure into the model. We also develop an extension that includes more complex structure, refining how the model generates identifier tokens based on what variables are currently in scope. Our models can be learned efficiently, and we show empirically that including appropriate structure greatly improves the models, measured by the probability of generating test programs.


Online Learning for Latent Dirichlet Allocation

Neural Information Processing Systems

We develop an online variational Bayes (VB) algorithm for Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). Online LDA is based on online stochastic optimization with a natural gradient step, which we show converges to a local optimum of the VB objective function. It can handily analyze massive document collections, including those arriving in a stream. We study the performance of online LDA in several ways, including by fitting a 100-topic topic model to 3.3M articles from Wikipedia in a single pass. We demonstrate that online LDA finds topic models as good or better than those found with batch VB, and in a fraction of the time.


Online Learning via Global Feedback for Phrase Recognition

Neural Information Processing Systems

This work presents an architecture based on perceptrons to recognize phrase structures, and an online learning algorithm to train the perceptrons together and dependently. The recognition strategy applies learning in two layers: a filtering layer, which reduces the search space by identifying plausible phrase candidates, and a ranking layer, which recursively builds the optimal phrase structure. We provide a recognition-based feedback rule which reflects to each local function its committed errors from a global point of view, and allows to train them together online as perceptrons. Experimentation on a syntactic parsing problem, the recognition of clause hierarchies, improves state-of-the-art results and evinces the advantages of our global training method over optimizing each function locally and independently.


Online Learning via Global Feedback for Phrase Recognition

Neural Information Processing Systems

This work presents an architecture based on perceptrons to recognize phrase structures, and an online learning algorithm to train the perceptrons together and dependently. The recognition strategy applies learning in two layers: a filtering layer, which reduces the search space by identifying plausible phrase candidates, and a ranking layer, which recursively builds the optimal phrase structure. We provide a recognition-based feedback rule which reflects to each local function its committed errors from a global point of view, and allows to train them together online as perceptrons. Experimentation on a syntactic parsing problem, the recognition of clause hierarchies, improves state-of-the-art results and evinces the advantages of our global training method over optimizing each function locally and independently.